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Chili Recipes R Us Bring em!!

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by wrbanwal, Feb 15, 2007.

  1. Carrie1219
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    Carrie1219 Banned Banned

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    Chippie and Charger Dave...

    THANK YOU for the great new recipes. Wow, we have some really good cooks on this board. I used to think I was a pretty good cook, but all you cooks on this thread take the cake... :yes:
  2. DefenseWins
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    DefenseWins New Member

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    I fixed it for you :yes:
    :lol:First me for some tasty Italian, now you with chili... maybe we should rename this "The Cravings Thread":lol:
    :blink:Oh my... whatever shall I do.:icon_huh:

    Should I bring the marshmellows to toast?:icon_shrug:

    And if you'll forgive my newbieness, just what does one wear to such an event? :whistling: Asbestos undies?

  3. DefenseWins
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    DefenseWins New Member

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    Ummm...you might think twice about being such a Chili Tease.:yes: Everyone knows that coming between a lady and her cravings can get you deep in the hot sauce... and Chipsa is a lawyer :lol:
  4. DefenseWins
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    DefenseWins New Member

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    {in his best Cheech-n-Chong voice}

    Uhhhh, Dave's not here man....:lol:
  5. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    Afraid this is another "tease" but.....

    Chili Hash Browns

    One of the great things about good chili is that it goes with just about anything else you want to put on the table, or for that matter, pour it over. Everybody has heard about "chili fries" thanks to all the fast food places adding it to their menu, but one of my personal favorites is "chili hash browns". Of course anything worth doing is worth "over-doing" in my book! Check it out:

    [​IMG]

    That is a 14 inch skillet - I like to season the "raw side" while the first is cooking, then flip the resulting 10" diameter hash brown like an omelet - covering the now "cooked" side with shredded cheese.

    Slip it off on a (large) plate and cover with chili (no beans) and finely diced raw onion.

    It sure will stick to the ribs, but please don't tell my doctor about this combo. Court is still out on its impact on BP, etc. ;)

    I plan to out-live that sucker anyway! <evil grin>
  6. sdbound
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    sdbound New Member

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    Damn! I'm salivating.
  7. Carrie1219
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    Carrie1219 Banned Banned

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    I'm on a low carb diet right now... but this might make for a good cheat one of these weekends... :lol:
  8. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    Kicking your chili up a notch without destroying the flavor!

    I like HOT chili - my old Grandpa did too. He complemented one of my hottest concoctions about 30 years ago when he pulled out his old bandanna, wiped the beads of sweat off the top of his poor old bald head, looked at me through misty eyes and said "now THAT has got some KICK to it!"

    Heck of it is I can't realistically just cook chili to suit myself these days - there are women and children to consider and co-pays for emergency room visits are expensive. ;)

    I've learned to "back it down" for their (and my wallet's) sake. Even then, the wife likes for me to cook off a full bag of elbow macaroni or bow-tie macaroni (her favorites) so she can pour her chili over it to cut the heat even more. (I know - but I love her and she hasn't kicked me out of the house for coming up on 44 years of marriage).

    Now doing all of this "cutting" resulted in making me a bit uncomfortable with the end result until I tried using Tabasco Habanero Sauce to kick it back up a bit. Habaneros are about the hottest (edible) stuff I've tried outside of Siam, (now called Thailand). (If you ever visit there - "Yam Nui" is a sauce, NOT a soup - one ladle-like spoon full is used over a whole bowl of rice. I about killed a waitress eating it like soup - poor dear had tears streaming down both cheeks as she offered me a pitcher of ice).

    [​IMG]

    It doesn't add much of its own flavor, (what it has is a kind of "fruity" taste), which means unlike their other products, it doesn't "take over" the flavor of your food - but it adds 7 to 8k scovilles of HEAT.:icon_eek: Bottom line, it works for ME. Your mileage may vary.

    ~~~

    Experimenter's corner:

    Fresh Habaneros are pretty good for cooking too! I most strongly recommend you wear elastic gloves while handling/slicing them then toss the gloves.

    A buddy of mine experimented with putting 6 whole habanero peppers in a pot of chili once over in Santee... He has since backed it down to one or two for a LARGE pot of chili. ;)
  9. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    The carbs may not be all that bad. I buy large cartons of dehydrated hash brown potatoes from Smart & Final to keep as part of our emergency (earthquake, fire, etc.), food supply. You can vacuum seal them and keep them for a very long time. Re-hydrate by putting the same number of cups of hot water (about 140 degrees) in a bowl as the number of cups of shredded potatoes and let it sit for 1/2 hour. Drain and cook as normal. They are very good but without quite as much starch as fresh. ;)

    Rotating emergency supplys is important, so I try to find inventive ways to use them, then restock.
  10. DefenseWins
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    DefenseWins New Member

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    [​IMG]And he lived to tell about it?:lol:
  11. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    Ayup - I did notice he walked funny for a spell after that. I ate one (small) bowl and allowed I didn't think I'd better have seconds - noticed he quit after about 3 spoons or so.:tup:
  12. DefenseWins
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    DefenseWins New Member

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    :icon_rofl::icon_rofl::icon_rofl::tup:
  13. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    Bump

    (I'm working on it).
  14. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    Papa's basic Chili that won't kill little kids nor permanently alienate the neighbor's wife.

    I suggest reading the whole thing carefully first before you get started.

    Ingredients:
    1 6-Pack of cheap near ice cold beer (I like MGD for this purpose)
    2 thick tri-tip steaks to hand grind or 2 lbs coarse ground chili meat
    1 bag of Carol Shelby's (Original Texas Brand Chili kit)
    2 med. or 1 large white onion
    1 bell pepper
    2 7oz cans of diced chilies (I like La Victoria)
    1 small 4oz can of diced jalapeño peppers (again, I like La Victoria)
    2 8oz cans tomato sauce (I like Hunts)
    1 14.5oz can diced tomatoes (I like S&W)
    1 15oz can of pinto beans (I like Ranch Style with jalapeños)
    1 15oz can of kidney beans (no personal preference)
    2 Tbsp cooking oil

    Condiments to have on hand - Cayenne (red) pepper - Chili powder - Cumin powder - Garlic powder

    Hardware:
    1 large pot (I use an 8 quart pot but 6 will get 'er done) with lid
    1 large frying pan
    1 large metal spoon to stir with
    1 water glass
    2 forks to cook/mix with
    1 pair of kitchen scissors

    Preparation:
    Drink a can of beer while you check to make sure you still have everything on hand - out and handy. Take time to read the package on the Carroll Shelby's bag for a good chuckle. This is a very good time to open all of the canned goods and set them near the cooking stove. Open the Carroll Shelby's mix bag and lay out the individual packets.

    Pour one can of beer in the large pot and set it on medium heat, (and since the stove is now on, open another one for yourself). Pour in the tomato sauce and diced tomatoes and the can of pinto beans. Drain the kidney beans in the sink, rinse with cold water and drain again, then add them to the pot. Pour in both cans of diced chilies and HALF the diced Jalapeños along with half of the juice from the can. Stir well and move on to the meat.

    Put about 2 tbl spoons of cooking oil in the frying pan, put it on medium/high heat and add the (previously thawed) chili meat. I like to use a cooking fork to keep it broken up during this stage - but don't get carried away here and turn it into taco meat - you are cooking CHILI and it should have some chewy consistency to it. By the same token, you don't want mouth sized "chunks" of meat either. Its up to you if you want to drain off some of the fat after initial cooking - I don't and am still alive but I am now taking blood pressure meds too. Your choice.

    Rinse, cut, clean the bell pepper then slice and dice it (I like to get it down to about 1/2 inch chunks to promote cooking). While you are at this, you can occasionally stir the meat around to promote even cooking. Don't get in a hurry, have some beer. When the meat looks about 3/4ths of the way done, toss the bell pepper in with the meat and stir/toss with the large spoon.

    Repeat with the onion. You don't have to worry about dicing onion quite as fine and don't be in a hurry here - the meat and bell pepper take longer to cook/saute than the onions will. The onion will only take a short time to turn semi translucent so kind of keep an eye on it at this point, stirring frequently.

    Open the package of chili seasoning from the "kit" with scissors and "dust" a layer onto the mix in the big pot *and* lightly dust the meat in the frying pan too. Stir both well. Repeat dusting/stirring in the big pot until you have folded in all of the mix. (Don't just "dump" it in - you don't want balls of spice in your chili!) Also add the little packets of salt and cayenne from the "kit".

    At this point I like to dust a thin layer of cayenne pepper a very thin layer of cumin powder and an equally thin layer of garlic powder over the meat - then stir well in the frying pan. Open yourself another beer and enjoy the smell of the meat cooking. The meat should be very near "done" and here is where you make an important judgment call. Be SURE the meat is done, you are making chili here - not some kind of rare steak. I can guarantee the chili won't taste right if you don't get the meat completely done.

    Using your large spoon, transfer the contents of the frying pan into your large cooking pan. Be careful. If you do it without spilling anything, open a can of beer to celebrate. Stir everything well - if the mix looks "dry" pour half of your beer in the pot and drink the other half yourself. Reduce the heat to low and cover the pot.

    Open the little packet of Masa flour and dump it into the water glass - pour the glass about 1/3rd full of beer (careful, it might foam temporarily) then stir very, very well with a fork. (Don't want lumps that will turn into dumplings). This thin Masa flour mix is your "thickening" agent and also adds a certain consistency I enjoy to the chili. You don't HAVE to use it but I always do. Remove the lid and introduce the flour into the pot while stirring - keep stirring for about a minute (remember no dumplings).

    Replace the lid and if there is any left - have a beer. The chili is already ready to serve, but I like to let it simmer a spell, stirring occasionally, while I find another six-pack. (If you didn't read the whole thing first and ran out of beer at this point - don't blame me!) Turn it off and let it set a spell. Let all those spices kind of "gel". Don't get in a hurry to eat it - reminding yourself that 2nd day chili is always hotter and better tasting - if you can keep some back from the ravenous hoards. Besides, you've got some beer there to keep you company right?

    ~~~

    Every now and then I will stub my toe while adding the additional Chili and Cumin powder - or slip and add the whole can of jalapeños, thereby threatening the taste buds of the little ones. When that happens, I will cook off a pot of some kind of pasta, (small elbow macaroni or bow-tie pasta work well) and simply ladle out some chili over the pasta for the kids.

    For me - I just like saltine crackers and plenty of beer with my chili - but that is for personal taste. Occasionally I will garnish my bowl with shredded cheese and finely diced raw onion but that is about it. I put out a bowl of shredded cheese and finely diced onion and let the rest of the family/friends pick their own poison.

    ~~~

    If its just me and the menfolks, I may eliminate the beans, dump in the whole can of jalapeños and get carried away with the additional Chili power and Cumin. My Grandpa always said "the redder the better" and I fear he ruined me for life.

    So let it be written, so let it be done!
    -=dave=-

    ~~~

    Afterthought: Cooking in general is much more of an "art" than a "science" - you should play with it - have fun - try different ingredients and proportions until you find out what makes YOU happy. The above makes me REAL happy, but to this very day I can't seem to resist "playing with it" just a little.
  15. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    Cooking Chili in the great outdoors...

    I absolutely *LOVE* cooking with cast iron-ware. Yeah, its heavy, but once properly seasoned it is practically non-stick, healthier than non-stick and you can use those good old metal cooking spoons, ladels and other utinsels without fear of damaging the pot or pan.

    The absolute most important thing to remember is to heat your iron-ware first before introducing oil and food into it.

    For a good way to cook chili out of doors, see my Chili recipe earlier in this thread - but replace the large pot with a nice Iron Dutch Oven and the large frying pan with a nice big Iron frying pan.

    I use Kingsford coals to heat the dutch oven and a thing called a "Big Kahuna Burner" (and a large bottle of propane) to heat the frying pan. Otherwise, everything is about the same although I might wear an old floppy hat and double my personal intake of beer just to combat the sun. Using that combination - there is virtually nothing I can't cook outdoors. How about some cornbread to go with the chili? Use a medium sized Dutch oven for that - it only takes about 20, 25 minutes to whip some some good eating!

    I've also been known to break out the big cast iron Wok to use with the Kahuna burner - stir-fry anyone?

    Yeah, we've got a 5th wheel with a stove, oven, and microwave built in - but the whole idea of camping is to get outdoors IMO. And anything cooked/eaten outdoors tastes better to me. A hamburger cooked outside is better than a good steak at at Ruth's Chris restaurant to this old boy.

    HINT! You can justify the expendature for a good outdoor cooking setup by convincing yourself it is part of you family's emergency preparation gear. I did - and IT IS! :)

    ~~~

    Afterthought - never pick up a hot, heavy piece of cast iron-ware until you already know exactly where you are going to set it down and that it will fit there in a safe fashion. (TV trays aren't safe/stable enough). I like to use inexpensive welders gloves (cheap at Harbor tool & freight) to handle hot iron of any kind.
  16. o-line protagonist
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    o-line protagonist BoltTalker

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    Dave,
    I promise I will try your chili recipe if for no other reason than simply the first line of the directions.

    "Drink a can of beer while you check to make sure you still have everything on hand."

    Crap, I just pissed my pants laughing!:icon_rofl:
    • Like Like x 1
  17. Concudan
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    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    I like chili!
  18. AnteaterCharger
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    AnteaterCharger Calibrating Bolttalk, Podcast by Podcast Staff Member Super Moderator Podcaster

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    maybe we should expand to other 'gameday' recipes
  19. DefenseWins
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    DefenseWins New Member

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    :icon_eek::icon_rofl::icon_rofl::icon_eek:
    Nice chili recipe - but I do believe I'll pass on that last suggestion:tup:</snip>
  20. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    I was talking about the recipe and its ingredients, but will forgive you your freakishly evil mind. Honest I will. Sometime NEXT year! :innocent:
  21. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    Vegetarian Chili

    One variation on my Chili I've thought about but never tried, (until tonight), is to make a pot of red that a Vegetarian could eat happily. Now I'm personally a confirmed omnivore/carnivore - but I do respect the needs of folks that choose a different path than mine, particularly where it involves FOOD.

    It is incredibly easy to do. See my Papa's Basic Chili Recipe and...

    1. Leave out the meat (obviously).
    2. Follow all of the directions - but using just the single large pot - add 1 TBSP of cooking oil and heat - then toss in your bell peppers first - stir frequently and later on add the onions. Then start adding all of the other ingredients from the basic recipe.
    3. Add a 2nd can of Pinto Beans to the recipe
    4. Add a can of sweet "whole kernel" corn (recommend rinse & drain before introducing it to the pot like you did with the kidney beans). If you want, you can add a 2nd can but it will kind of "take over" if you aren't careful.

    Remember to "dust & stir" in all of those spices - leave no "spice lumps".. Later remember NO DUMPLINGS with the masa flour.

    Don't get in a fizz and try to eat it too early! Give all those spices and ingrediants time to introduce themselves to each other and start dancing under the influence of the MGD. Let it set if you can stand to do so, have another beer - its better later on.

    ~~~

    I guess many folks have studied the basics of survival, particularly in today's "climate", there are a lot of us that recognize there may come a time when meat is scarce - and especially that Beans (or even Legumes) and Corn when combined in a meal provide all of the necessary amino acids to produce a whole protein for us to live off of. (Well, it lacks one amino acid but our own bodies can "fabricate" it - aren't we cool?).. Beans and rice serve the same purpose. Vegetarians have always known this. When there is no meat available for the pot - just call me "Vegetarian Dave" if you like and we'll leave it at that. I choose to eat and live happy. ;)

    Regarding the pot of this I made tonight, I might have stubbed my toe on the Cayenne and Cumin powder again - but that's OK - I plan to warn the wife.... Honest. :)

    p.s. Don't forget the beer - that's the secret - as long as the cook is happy, everything always turns out good!:tup:
  22. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    Tailgate Chili

    I have only one peice of advice - DON"T try to cook chili at the tailgate folks. You are there to socialize, eat, have some refreshment then go in and enjoy heck out of the game. Don't wear yourself out! REHEAT chili at the tailgate! Chili is ALWAYS better on the second day - take advantage of that fact and cook it at home the day before the game. Let it cool, put it in refrigerator containers then toss THEM in the cooler before you take off. (Don't forget the saltines!)

    Busy the day before the game or have to work? - You can make it a few days before if you like... But one thing I have to warn you about is that beans will eventually sour in your refrigerator - you can't keep it in there forever, (a problem I never have around here). No problemo - make your chili WITHOUT beans. If you have to have them, add them later on at the tailgate when you are reheating your fine pot of red.

    Afterthought: In my opinion, there is nothing that tastes better on a cold day outside than a good bowl of red... Something to keep in mind as we approach playoff time! :icon_toast:
  23. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    How to keep Chili in the freezer..

    A few years ago, this technique was recommended by one of my friends who happens to enjoy a good bowl of red now an again. I took his advice and have been doing it ever since.

    I like to make an extra pot of red (NO BEANS - remember, they go sour on you - this won't work with the vegetarian variant) let it cool completely then using small glass meatloaf sized "baking pans" and a little wax paper, freeze the chili into little meal-sized "bricks". The next day, after removing them from the pans (thus the wax paper) I will vacuum seal each "brick" then label the packet with what it is and the date it was prepared. Back into the freezer it goes.

    I have found this "pre-freezing" process works very well and will permit me to vacuum seal just about anything, liquid or no - so it is a very, very handy trick to know.

    Why vacuum pack? Well, I have left bricks of chili packed in this fashion in the freezer for 3 months - pulled one out, reheated it and doggone if it didn't taste like 2nd day chili! It would probably last longer - but 3 months is my "personal limit" for frozen foods.

    This little trick works very well as a preparation for using Chili as a side-dish at just about any occasion. Tailgating, backyard BBQ, camping, fishing - anywhere you can heat it back up - its all good!

    I have, however, found that it is hard to keep chili frozen when you have kids and grandkids that know you do this. Probably best not to "advertise" if you want it to stay in there more than a week. ;)

    Afterthought: The vacuum packer I elected but buy some time ago, and have had GREAT luck with is called the FoodSaver (I bought the best one I could find from CostCo). I have never owned a Seal-a-meal and having had such great luck with the FoodSaver probably never will. Simply stated it works for me and the self-made bags are better than any freezer bag I've found yet.:tup:
  24. KimPossible
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    KimPossible BoltTalker

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    He does...and I'm not much of a chili eater...but his sounds good. I might make it for my dad later this month...he is a chili eater.
  25. wrbanwal
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    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    chili good

    make me some tonight


    ummmmm


    good


    :tup:

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