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Chili Recipes R Us Bring em!!

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by wrbanwal, Feb 15, 2007.

  1. DefenseWins
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    DefenseWins New Member

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    Well, I teased you guys last fall with a picture of my Silly Chili Lasagna - but never got around to writing the recipe up to go along with the pics. Needed something to take my mind off other things this afternoon - so I wrote the entire thing up :)

    This isn't a 5 minute kitchen visit - it's a bit of a marathon, so grab a beer, wine, or other drink of your choice and wade in. First are a couple of things that have to be made, two of which can be done ahead of time and stored:

    To start with, you have to have some chili powder. Now you can get some of that store bought kind, but I usually make up my own. You might have a recipe for some yourself - feel free to substitute yours in when it's called for... just use the same amount.

    Silly Homemade Chili Powder (1 batch):
    • 3 tablespoons Cumin Powder
    • 1 tablespoon Paprika
    • 1 tablespoon Cayenne pepper
    • 1/2 tablespoon Garlic Powder
    • 1 teaspoon oregano
    Mix well and your done (I use a spice grinder) - gee, wasn't that easy!

    The next thing you need is some picante sauce - same thing goes as with the chili powder, you can buy store bought or use your own - just use the same amount:

    Silly Homemade Picante Sauce (1 batch):
    • 12 oz can Hunts Diced Tomatoes
    • 12 oz can Hunts tomato sauce
    • 4 fresh Jalepeno Peppers
    • 1 Large red onion (they're usually purplish in the store)
    • 1/2 Green Bell Pepper
    • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
    • 1 teaspoon chili powder
    • 1/4 cup white vinegar
    • 1 cup water
    You'll notice I called out Hunts brand for the tomato products. I never use anything else - and if you do, don't blame the results on me :p

    Dice the onion and bell pepper.

    Mince the jalepeno peppers. If you want it hotter, add ONE minced Habanero - just remember the chili powder we'll be using has cayenne in it ;)

    Stir all the ingredients together in a small saucepan and bring to a boil.

    Lower heat to medium and cover - let bubble and cook for AT LEAST 45 minutes (longer is better).

    Stir every 10 minutes and if it starts to get too thick, add 1/4 cup of water. See the note about the chili sauce for how to tell when it's properly "aged".

    You now have one "batch" of picante sauce - can also be used as relish or chip dip.


    The beans

    Different people have different tastes for what kind of beans to use for chili (some use no beans at all - I'm that way sometimes, but the chili lasagna MUST have beans).

    I tend to vary the kind of beans I use depending upon what exactly I'm making. Black beans are great if it's going to be 'just' a bean chili.

    However for chili lasagna I prefer red kidney beans - none of that canned stuff either! Start with a pack of dried red kidney beans.

    Soak the beans overnight in the refrigerator in a pan of water with 1 tablespoon garlic power and 1 tablespoon cayenne pepper mixed in the water (adds a little zest to 'em). Add enough water in the pan so it's about 2" above the level of the beans.

    The next day, drain the water off (very important with kidney beans). Add fresh water again until about 2" above the bean level. Put the pan on the stove and slow boil the beans covered until done - it usually takes between 1 to 2 hours for red kidneys. Just remember, you want them semi-firm - not mushy!!

    Drain the water off and set aside until needed. If you start them about 30 minutes before you start the chili sauce, they'll be done at about the same time. This is the one ingredient you can't do ahead of time.


    Now if you don't have the time or are in a pinch, you can substitute for the above 3 items - but I guarantee the results will not be as good.

    Here's the substitute list for the lazy or cooking-challenged:
    • Chili-powder - use a pack of McCormicks Chili Powder (but add 2 tablespoons of cumin)
    • Picante sauce - you can use Pace Picante sauce (mild or hot) in a pinch, get a big jar of it
    • Kidney Beans - I suppose you could use canned kidney beans
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  2. DefenseWins
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    DefenseWins New Member

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    Now that we have the preliminary ingredients taken care of, we come to the main recipe. It's always my advice that when cooking meals that take time to make use of a "kitchen helper". They can be invaluable when you need a third hand, need an emergency run to the grocery store, have multiple items to chop and dice, or just are in need of a nice hug to help inspire you onward. Thus we begin the main recipe...

    Silly Chili Lasagna
    • 1 large, juicy Vidalia Onion
    • 1 pound chili meat
    • 1 pound Jimi Dean hot sausage
    • 29 oz can Hunts Stewed Tomatoes
    • 1/4 cup worcestershire sauce (Lea & Perrins is all I will use)
    • 1 batch of Chili Powder
    • 1 batch of Picanti Sauce
    • 2 bags of mixed grated cheese - I like Kraft's Classic Melt mix of Monterrey Jack, Cheddar, and American cheese.
    • Extra Virgin Olive Oil
    • 1 kitchen helper (see opening paragraph above)
    Gather up all your ingredients, get out your utensils, and then give your kitchen helper a nice hug.

    Put enough olive oil in a large skillet to just cover it's bottom (the skillet, NOT your kitchen helper).

    Cover the pan and slow brown the chili meat and sausage together on medium heat. Occasionally stir the meat, re-covering after stirring.

    Add the worecestershire sauce when almost done, mixing well. When done, pour the meat AND the juice into a large sauce pan (I use a 6-quart pan).

    While the meat is browning, chop up the entire Vidalia onion and give your helper another hug. If you ask them nicely, they might stir the meat for you while you're chopping the onion.

    Now add the chopped Vidalia, stewed tomatoes, and picanti sauce to the sauce pan with the meat and juice. Do not add the chili powder yet! Stir together well and cover the pan. Cook covered over medium heat - cooking time is usually 1 1/2 hours.

    You MUST keep an eye on it, stirring every 5 to 10 minutes. Lower the heat to medium-low as it begins to thicken. If it starts to get too thick, add a little water (1/4 cup) - you don't want it to stick and burn!!! When you come back from stirring and checking on the sauce, share another hug with your helper.

    While it's cooking, you and your helper can sit and talk together or play a game or two to help pass the time. Just remember - keep checking on the sauce!! Don't watch a movie or something, getting so involved that you forget the chili sauce and ruin it.

    Here's what the chili sauce looks like when you first start cooking it:
    [​IMG]

    Here's a helpful cooking hint I'll throw in free of charge:

    There's a way to tell the MINIMUM time to cook any sauce with onions in it... when initially cut and diced onions are an opaque whitish. As a sauce cooks, they start losing their color and becoming translucent (you start to be able to see through them). When they become fully transparent (like looking through a thick clear plastic), you know you've reached the MINIMUM sauce cooking time.

    Here's what it starts looking like a bit before the powder is added - notice the onions getting "clearer" now:
    [​IMG]

    AFTER it's slow boiled for an hour, add the chili powder mix - NOT BEFORE. You want the sauce thin during the initial cooking to get the ingredients "cooked down" and their flavor mixed into the sauce.

    Here's what it looks like when almost done - notice the almost see through onions and how it's darker with the chili powder added:
    [​IMG]

    You now have the chili sauce made. At this point you can take a piece of whole wheat bread and make a sandwich to "test the sauce". It also helps ease the hunger pains induced from smelling the delicious sauce as it cooked. Just remember, share the sandwich with your helper... then of course, share another hug.[​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Note: at this point, you can store the chili sauce in airtight tupperware containers and even freeze it for later use.


    If you ever make the chili sauce and want to serve it by itself (no beans, etc.) and it's too 'thin', thicken it with a little stone ground whole wheat flour. This is a last resort - it really means you either haven't cooked it long enough or added too much water.

    Now you have all you're ingredients done and you are ready to make the actual Chili Lasagna. It's been a long road here - so give your helper another hug![​IMG]
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  3. DefenseWins
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    DefenseWins New Member

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    Making the Silly Chili Lasagna now that the chili sauce is done and the beans are cooked.

    Pre-heat the oven to 350.

    Since I was making some of this batch with the intent to give some to friends, I used aluminum foil, deep dish baking tins. They work great when you plan on sharing a batch of oven baked food - the recipients don't have to worry about getting your pan back to you. You'll want to use a pan that is at least 4" deep so you can get lots of layers.

    Put a layer of chili sauce on the bottom of the pan (about 1/2" deep). Now put a layer of beans on top (enough to cover the sauce). Then sprinkle a thick layer of cheese over the beans.

    Continue layering the ingredients - chili sauce, beans, cheese until the pan is full.

    Here's a sequence of pics showing the progression:
    2nd Layer
    3rd Layer
    4th Layer
    5th Layer
    6th Layer
    7th Layer

    Cover the pan tightly with aluminum foil.

    Cook at 350 for at least 1 hour.

    While it's in the oven cooking, you and your helper can go for a walk to work up an appetite (or snuggle on the couch and enjoy each others company).

    Retract the pan from the oven and check out what you have:
    [​IMG]

    Serve with some thick sliced bread - for me, as usual, whole wheat.


    After serving, your pan will look like this:

    [​IMG]

    Remember, Chili Lasagna isn't a table food - take it in the den and sit together on the couch. Watch a good movie or a football game while enjoying the fruits of your labor. Be sure to thank your helper afterwards for all their help and support :D

    After the movie or game is over and the chili lasagna is gone - go for a nice walk with your helper... it'll help digest all that food you ate and give you a chance to air things out a bit[​IMG]

    Oh - and remember... always thank your helper and give them an extra hug or two.[​IMG]

    This recipe brought to you by the hugging gourmet - note that eating of this dish may cause the release of noxious fumes - use at your own risk.
  4. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    Note to self - when you try doing this at an RV Camp - be certain to bring along bicycles to assist in quoted "post consumption" procedure. ;) If grandkids are partaking, give them Gas-X for desert!
  5. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    Global Warming the Asian way!

    (But its still about chili).. [​IMG]

    My career in the Navy took me completely around the world 5 1/2 times, but most of my time overseas was spent in the Western Pacific (WestPac) where I found many, many kindred souls who loved spicy foods. From Korean "Kim Chee" to their hot pickled radish, to eating "Yam Nui" in Thailand that surprised even MY taste buds - (I thought it was soup and didn't realize one oriental spoon full was supposed to be used to season a whole bowl of rice)... I was in hog heaven over there and loved going to the local restaurants where "the natives ate". Oh there were a few places that "messed with me" and tested my capacity for the "really hot stuff" - but generally when they saw me smiling after trying their "trick" hot stuff - I wound up making many friends despite language/racial barriers. [​IMG]

    I am no expert on "Asian Chili Peppers" - and many folks give credit to the Portuguese for introducing chili peppers into Asia (particularly China) in the first place - all I know is I LOVE it!

    Chili Oil
    Chili Paste
    HOT Chili/bean sauce

    It is ALL good and all welcome where I am concerned. There is no better way for me to REALLY enjoy some home made stir fry than to kick it up a notch with some good chili paste. (I actually like mine a little "oily").

    Our local Chinese "take out" has a "spicy broccoli and beef with shrimp" plate that is heaven. I dip the little pieces of beef in the hot oil/paste they provide, and the shrimp in hot oriental mustard. My idea of HEAVEN!

    You can make a very passable chili oil/paste using crushed red peppers. I like the dried Mexican "chilis de arbol" - the same primary ingredient found in a good Mexican red salsa.

    WARNING - if you use bare hands be very, very careful to wash them with hot, soapy water after handling ANY hot chili! I now use thin, rubber "throw away" gloves bought by the box from WalMart for this after a bad experience involving habaneros. (Live and learn?)

    I get rid of the stems and tips, and "crush" them by tossing them in a blender for about 20 seconds or so. (YOU may want to spend some time removing seeds - I don't bother). :tup:

    At this point, you might want to reserve some of the dry crushed pepper flakes for your home made pizzas/etc.

    Some folks will then add a tiny amount of water to some of the flakes and continue to blend until it makes a kind of paste - they just add a bit of salt and use it that way.. I prefer using hot oil and infusing the pepper "heat" into the oil.

    All recipe amounts will vary depending upon how much you are making, and how "thick" you want your oil/paste - the results will be fine in the fridge for about a month - so you may not want to make too much in one batch.

    1 cup peanut oil (you can replace with corn/veggie oil - I like peanut)
    1/4 cup sesame sauce
    1/2 to 2/3rds cup crushed red peppers (desired consistency - I use 2/3).
    1 Tbsp cayenne pepper
    1 tsp garlic powder (this may be eliminated if you like)

    On high, heat peanut oil until it starts to smoke, then reduce heat to medium. Add sesame sauce first, then rest of ingredients. Stir continuously for about 2 minutes. Remove from heat and let set for 1 hour.

    Now it is decision time - if you like you can strain the mixture to produce a pretty good hot chili oil - I prefer to use it "as is" - jar it and refrigerate - remembering to put the date on the jar and a note to toss it after 1 month.

    Keep this totally away from small children - it could ruin them for life. [​IMG]
  6. DefenseWins
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    DefenseWins New Member

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    :icon_eek:Noooooooooooooooooooo!!!!!:no:

    The seeds are where the 'heat' is:yes::tup:
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  7. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    Last weekend I cooked off a very large London Broil on the grill using the offset heat/smoke method one would use for good brisket or ribs. It turned out OK - but immediately decided I was going to get a pot of chili out of a little over half of it. Then, upon further reflection, decided to try it in my cast iron wok.

    [​IMG]
    Started off pre-heating the cast iron wok (which is certainly seasoned well enough to handle the job). The meat is about 1 1/2 lbs of left over London Broil, with lots of garlic and LOTS of onion. Quite naturally, the first thing I opened was a can of beer to keep me refreshed while chopping/dicing everything up.

    [​IMG]
    Used masa flour and refried beans, (plus a little more beer), to balance the consistency. Looks/tastes like a respectable mess of red.
  8. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    [FONT=Verdana,Sans-serif]Man gulps 11.5 pounds, wins Ohio chili contest[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana,Sans-serif] MASON, Ohio (AP) - A man nicknamed "Humble Bob" stuffed himself with 11.5 pounds of a local specialty called chili-spaghetti in only about 10 minutes to claim victory in a holiday eating contest.

    Bob Shoudt won $2,500 at the inaugural Skyline Chili Spaghetti eat-off Monday at Kings Island amusement park.

    "Humble Bob" dashed to an early lead, sucking down more than two pounds in less than a minute.

    Shoudt, of Philadelphia, is ranked No. 5 by the International Federation of Competitive Eating.

    He did so well at vacuuming up the pasta mixture Monday that he narrowly beat the federation's top-ranked competitive eater, Joey Chestnut.

    Chestnut won this year's July 4 hot dog-eating contest at New York's Coney Island with 59 dogs in 10 minutes.
    [/FONT]
    ---

    Expect to see Bob advertising for Gas-X soon... ;)

    ---

    On occasion, I have been known to mix some of my hotter Chili with spaghetti and other pasta on occasion to keep from killing a grandkid or two.
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  9. Chelsea
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    Chelsea Well-Known Member

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    For any of you guys and gals that use the little cans of tomato sauce in any of your chili recipes.....try substituting with El Pato. Comes in little yellow cans. Has a nice bite!:yes:
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  10. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    I prefer Rotel, but to each his/her own!! :)

    BTW, we've missed you here Darlin!! :yes:
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  11. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    YUK!

    Earlier this year I ran across a recipe for Lentil Chili and just *had* to give it a shot. Life around the old Pondee heated up this summer/autumn but I finally got around to giving it a shot last weekend.

    My recommendation = don't.

    I make a red lentil soup that has received many, many complements - will stick with that and lentil based stews in the future - they will NOT be in my chili.
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  12. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    THIS IS A PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT!

    Its just not a good idea to stand behind Jamal when he is ... er .... "venting" after a good bowl of red.

    [​IMG]

    This thread may now resume its normal programming.
  13. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    Here is a pretty good web site my cousins from Texas enjoy with some decent recipes tucked away in it:

    www.texascooking.com/features/bbq.htm "Traditional Texas Fare"

    I've been a fan of John Raven, Ph B, for quite a spell now. Enjoy heck out of his writing style - for instance, from his Chili article last January:

    "Good chili results not so much from what you put in it as what you don't put in it. Good chili contains no arrowroot, anise, aspirin or arrowheads. Also no chocolate, sour cream or flax seed. Leave out rawhide doggie chews and empty cans. No seafood allowed. We don't want to see any whole *** peppers floating in a sea of red grease either."

    I do heartily disagree with him about blending stuff to a puree before adding it to his chili though. That would be after the fight here at the Pondee. :icon_toast:
  14. wrbanwal
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    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Big Chili cook off this weekend.


    What recipe should I go with??
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  15. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    All of them are good but for a cook-off I would avoid beans and the veggie stuff.

    It starts with the meat - I would highly recommend coarse ground tri-tip if you get to provide your own - if they are providing the meat, most cook-off rules will let you use your own hand meat grinder which, again, is highly recommended with the coarsest blade you have.

    Most of all - remember to keep the cook happy - that is my own personal "primary" secret to effective chili-makin!

    Good luck and have a ton of fun - that is what you are really out there for! :tup::flag:


    Edited: Two final thoughts - while you sautee the meat, be sure to toss in some cumin (don't be bashful with it) that tends to bring out the flavor of the meat. Also, my grandpa had a saying "the redder the better" - don't be bashful with the chili powder - he used to add quite a bit of paprika just to add "color" to the pot. its called "a bowl of red" for good reason. ;)
  16. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    A good friend over on forums.chargers.com told me the last time he made some red (using Papa's basic Chili recipe) he had run out of crackers to go with it.

    Long story short - there sat a box of his child's "gold fish" so he dumped them in with his chili and thought it was great!

    OK - guess who now has 2 boxes of goldfish setting on top of the fridge - the other box is GONE! This is one of those "don't knock it until you've tried it" thangs. :tup:
  17. WonderSlug
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    WonderSlug New Member

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    So far, all the chili I've had has been for weak-kneed tourist pansies. People that can't handle the spice.

    Give me the good stuff! Make it a ten-alarm gutbuster!

    My motto with spicy food: KILL ME TIL I'M DEAD!

    "If I'm not cryin', yer not tryin'!"

    Load the mutha up with jalapenos, habaneros, tabasco, cayenne pepper, etc.
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  18. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    I'm gonna have to call ya "Scovils" instead of "Sluggo"! :D

    I was with you right up to the tobasco, (unless you meant the habanero sauce produced under the "Tobasco" name brand) - far as I'm concerned that particular item has no place in chili. (Yeah I know, its in all of the boy scout manuals and cook books, but ugh - why not just pour in a glass of vinegar?)

    Habanero chilis are great for adding heat without taking over the flavor IMO - but you sure have to warn folks if you put in more than a couple and its a good idea to wear those disposeable gloves while you are chopping them up... I have been known to use habanero sauce to kick up my personal bowl of red a notch and it isn't bad.

    Normally, I just pick up the small cans of diced jalapenos - depending upon how much I am making in the batch, one can is normally more than enough for the family's tastes.
  19. wrbanwal
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    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the tips Dave,

    It was a great time. I didn't win but they ate all of mine!!

    Measure of a good chili in my opinion

    :tup:
  20. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    I rarely have any "left-overs" either Gramps. Chili is great comfort food too! :D
  21. Charger Dave
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    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    I have it on good authority that BFISA moved to California and now eats beans in his chili... #Imjustsaying

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