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Flying and landing on A WING and A PRAYER-

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by BFISA, May 15, 2007.

  1. DefenseWins
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    DefenseWins New Member

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    I can confirm both letters... my folks live in Phoenix now and Dad (retired AF) and I talked at some length about it at the time it occurred. Also have no doubt the complainer received a great many letters...
  2. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Good digs y'all!! :yes: :tup:
  3. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  4. Shamrock
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    Shamrock New Member

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    Great plane .... unless you have to spend 20+ hours in one .... :icon_evil:

    I think I wrote about that trip from Travis to Saudi in here somewhere.
  5. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Yup!!

    Onea my adventures onna C-141 occurred in '82. I'd slipped onna patch of ice at Ft Bragg and broke my right ankle. In order to keep on jump status I had to make water jumps outtuva Huey.

    There was a C-141 at Pope AFB, adjacent to Ft Bragg waitin take off for Ft Gordon, GA (CRS the airfield there :icon_shrug: :icon_huh:) to pick up abuncha Army engineers and their equipment and fly them backta Ft Leonard Wood, MO.

    If paratroopers jump outtuv any AF A/C, the $$$ for that A/C comes outta AF funds, so a call was put out for volunteers to jump this bird. I couldn't jump, but I could be a static Jumpmaster/safety.

    The DZ at Leonard Wodd was a strip of land mebbe 150 meters X 500 meters, about a 4 second DZ, so only 5 jumpers could go out of each pass.

    The loadmaster open both jump doors, so I lay on the floor of the Right jump door, whilst the Jumpmaster tried to spot the release point out of the Left jump door. But as I lay on the floor, I saw that the release point had been set up so I could see it but the jumpmaster couldn't. I hobbled over to him with my cast and told him to tap the jumpers out the jumpers out on my signal from the opposite jump door.

    Worked out well, and all jumpers hit the DZ!! :tup:
  6. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  7. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  8. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  9. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  10. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Silk Chutes and Hard Fighting: US. Marine Corps Parachute Units in World War II, Lieutenant Colonel Jon T. Hoffman (USMCR)

    Read the following incident and figured only a Marine could do something like this! :)

    Richard

    The most unusual accident occurred near San Diego, California, on 15 May 1941. Second Lieutenant Walter A. Osipoff and 11 enlisted men of Company A were making a practice jump over Kearney Mesa. Everyone else had exited the plane and he threw out a cargo pack, which possibly tangled in his static line. His parachute opened prematurely while he was still in the door of the plane; it billowed outside the aircraft and pulled him out, but the canopy and suspension lines tangled in the bundle of static lines streaming beside the transport. For a moment the cargo pack, Osipoff and his partially opened parachute were all suspended from the cable that held the static lines. Under this combined load the bracket holding one end of the cable gave way and it streamed out the door. The cargo pack fell away, but Osipoff and his parachute remained dangling from the cable and static lines, suspended behind the plane's tail. The accident also mined his reserve chute and ripped away the part of his harness attached to his chest. He ended up being dragged through the air feet-first, held only by the leg straps.

    The crew of the plane attempted to pull him in but could not do so. Since the transport had no radio communications, the pilot flew it over the field at North Island to attract attention. Two Navy test pilots, Lieutenant William W. Lowery and Aviation Chief Machinist's Mate John R. McCants, saw the problem and took off in a SOC-1, an open-cockpit, two-seater biplane. The SOC-1 flew just below and behind the transport while McCants attempted to pull Osipoff into his cockpit. It was an incredible display of flying skill given the necessity to avoid hitting the Marine lieutenant with the SOC-1's propellers. McCants finally succeeded in getting him head first into the plane, though his legs dangled outside. Before McCants could cut the shroud lines, bumpy air pushed the biplane up and its propellers did the job (chopping off 12 inches of the tail cone of the transport in the process). Lowery landed his aircraft as McCants maintained his tenuous grip on the Marine parachutist.

    Osipoff suffered severe cuts and bruises and a fractured vertebra. He spent three months in a body cast, but fully recovered and returned to jump status. Lowery and McCants received Distinguished Flying Crosses for their successful rescue.
  11. TBF
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    TBF BoltTalker

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    Great Story! Thanks!
  12. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    <snipped>



    Student Unconscious, Pilot Forced To Hike Two Hours For Help
    Improvisation has saved lives before... and it may very well have saved a New Zealand flight instructor and his student last weekend.

    Pilot Instructor Richard Bateman, 27, told the Timaru Herald his Robin R2120 clipped the side of a mountain in a region of rugged terrain in New Zealand's South Island last Sunday, while he was attempting a maneuver to gain airspeed.

    After impact, student pilot Nick Eagleson lost consciousness. Bateman, who suffered a broken arm and wrist, said he managed to remove the canopy and extricate Eagleson and laid him out on a wing.

    "We were both strapped in, Nick was unconscious," said Bateman. "I was feeling bad, I knew I had some injuries. I was bleeding from my head and my wrist was out of shape."

    "I got out and then shut everything off," he said. "I was pretty dazed."

    Bateman realized a large chunk of his scalp was loose and he was bleeding profusely so went looking for his survival kit. He found tape and secured his scalp to his skull by wrapping it around from the top of his head around the bottom of his chin.

    "I think I put a baseball cap on, too," he said.

    "I was concerned for myself. I was losing a lot of blood, I was pretty shattered. I thought there was a fairly good possibility I could die," he told the Australian Associated Press.

    After activating his personal locator beacon, in case the one on the aircraft wasn't functioning, Bateman then set off on what turned out to be a two hour trek in search of help.

    "I tried to figure out the best course of action. There was nothing I could do for Nick," he said.

    He arrived at a mustering hut and lit fires of dried grass as a signal to passing aircraft. A passing helicopter saw the signal and landed.

    <>"The guy asked if I had anything to do with the plane crash. I said 'yes', jumped in, and we went to the site."

    The two men were rescued and taken to a local hospital where Bateman underwent surgery to reattach his scalp and received treatment for his arm and wrist.

    Eagleson underwent surgery as well, for a chipped vertebrae. He also suffered broken pelvis and head lacerations.

    The Civil Aviation Authority is investigating.
  13. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Redneck Carrier Landing-

    <object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/bowAkD_RRcM"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/bowAkD_RRcM" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="350"></embed></object>
  14. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  15. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  16. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    snipped....

    "The first V-22 Osprey combat squadron left for Iraq this week onboard a Navy amphibious assault ship, marking a pronounced shift in military aviation technology.

    Marine Corps spokesman Major Eric Dent told McClatchy Newspapers 10 Ospreys left Monday aboard the USS Wasp, in a surprisingly low-key deployment made with little fanfare... though under extremely tight security.

    "It was just another workday for the squadron," Dent said. Citing "operational security," Dent would not discuss when the Ospreys were due to arrive in Iraq.

    Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 263 -- nicknamed "The Thunder Chickens" -- will base its MV-22s (the Marine verison of the Osprey) at the Al Asad Airbase in western Iraq. The squadron is scheduled to conduct at least seven months of combat operations.


    The "Thunder Chickens" have 28 pilots -- including two women -- who volunteered for the job, and were chosen by a Marine Corps selection board, according to McClatchy. The squadron commander is Lt. Col. Paul J. Rock, Jr., who has flown Ospreys since the 1990s....."
  17. Shamrock
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    Shamrock New Member

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    Ever seen those things fly? They have a squadron or test area just on the outskirts of Amarillo. A meat packer company that I used to load at had Osprey's flying overhead all the time. They look so damn unsteady.

    The first time I heard of them was in the early 90's and I had a friend whose former husband had been selected as a pilot for some of the early Osprey trials. Not sure if they were flying them yet then, or if it was just sim stuff.

    IMO, that bird is one big God damned waste of money.
  18. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    The empirical evidence supports you opinion.
  19. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  20. Shamrock
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    Shamrock New Member

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    I'll tell you the story on that next time I see you. Again, no biggie, just some personal crap involved in how I knew about some of the Osprey stuff.
  21. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    A favorite story from former CNO Admiral Jim Holloway USN Retired..... ..

    One thing about Air Force pilots is that they lie a lot. You simply can't trust them at all.

    We had an argument one night at the Belvedere Inn, across from the main gate at NAS Pax River, a bunch of our F-14 Tomcat Pilots at Strike were arguing with some F-15 Eagle drivers from Langley about who was better at what and which airplane was better.

    Well, we decided to settle it the next morning in the restricted area over the Chesapeake Bay. This is where we found out about how much Air Force pilots lie!!!

    We all agreed to meet nose on at 35 thousand and settle it once and for all. Don't you know those lying, sneaky bastards howed up at 40 thousand. God, what a bunch of lying, low lifes those Air Force types were, showing up with a 5 thousand foot altitude advantage.

    Hell....if we hadn't been at 45 thousand, those lying Air Force dirtbags would have had us for breakfast!!! !!!!
  22. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  23. Johnny Lightning
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    Johnny Lightning Go Bolts

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  24. sdbound
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    sdbound New Member

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    • Like Like x 1
  25. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  26. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    From onea My Brothers whose "boots are on the ground"-

    Men,

    I was in Iraq for a couple of months training Marines recently, and had the opportunity to fly on the V-22 for 6 or 7 flights.

    I found it to be very effective at getting men and materiel to the required destinations very rapidly, and, as I am writing this tonight, obviously very safely.

    I was very impressed with the performance.

    I have to admit though, that it is kind of weird to watch the engines swivel while flying like a helo, and then transition to conventional flight mode.

    Jeff C.
  27. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  28. BFISA
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    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    http://www.f22-raptor.com/media/video_gallery/videos/F22_AirShow_Langley.wmv

    The F/A-22 is now operational, with several wings already flying in the Air Force. The JSF-35 'Lightning' is fast approaching operational, and can do much more than the F/A-22 - including literally stopping in mid-air from near super-sonic flight. The Su-27 / Su-31 'Cobra' maneuver was essentially a 'one-trick pony' maneuver. The F/A-22, and especially the JSF-35, can stop and eat a Sukoyhan doing the 'Cobra' maneuver, plus do so much more.

    And, as pointed out by some ex-F-4 Phantom drivers, ANY of these maneuvers in an F-4 Phantom would have resulted in stall/fall/spin. H. Ownby (USAFA '69) Fast (super-cruise*) and stealthy, and integrated avionics are cool, but what's really impressive is the F/A-22s low speed stability and maneuverability. In the late 40s and to early 60s aeronautical engineers were going nuts on how to shape intakes to handle both subsonic and super-sonic air flows, without stagnation or compressor stalls. Supersonic in itself was a big challenge because you had to use shock waves to slow the intake air mass to sub-sonic before it hit the compressor blades, or they would stall. The engineers figured it out, but the solution was keeping a lot of air going in the front end to make sure all the hot air kept going out th e back end.

    As you watch this Mach 2 airplane suspend motionless in air and do tail slides, be aware of the truly amazing performance of the engines and intakes.Some used to think the Su-27 / Su-31 'Cobra' (the Su series are Russian aircraft) maneuver was the epitome of 3rd to 4th generation fighter maneuverability. That snap maneuver doesn't hold a candle to what this two-dimensional vectored-thrust fighter with fat independent horizontal stabs can do at low speed.

    There must be far more tricks up its sleeve in the high subsonic dogfight speed range.The video is about 5 minutes long, but the last 30-40 seconds are priceless.

    Note also, that the RAPTOR does a complete 360 degree turn in less than 20 seconds!

    ACC recently approved the Raptors new DEMO profile. This was the first show. Five minute video.Watch the elevators of the airplane in this demo. They work independently. It also has vectored thrust.*Supercruise: The F/A-22 can sustain supersonic flight without the use of fuel-gulping afterburners. I.e. 1.6
  29. BFISA
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    Cost Overruns Nix Upgrades To Oldest Galaxy's

    Faced with a program that's significantly overbudget, on the Thursday the US Air Force announced it will scale back a multi-billion dollar program to upgrade engines on C-5 Galaxy heavy-lift transports.

    The Associated Press reports the Air Force will proceed to replace aging engines on 47 C-5B and two C-5C aircraft, with modern CF6-80C2L1F turbofans -- but 62 of the oldest C-5As will soldier on with their existing engines, due to cost overruns on what was originally an $11.1 billion program, when the Air Force awarded the contract to Lockheed Martin in November 2001.

    However, projected costs for the Reliability Enhancement and Re-engining Program (RERP) have since swelled to $17.5 billion... triggering a Nunn-McCurdy violation, which requires the Pentagon to disclose to Congress when costs on a major program exceed 15 percent of the amount originally budgeted.

    The contract will be scaled back to $7.7 billion, according to John Young, under secretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics. Under the new contract, Lockheed may only spend a maximum of $123 million per plane.

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