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1090 asks Goodell about the Chargers moving

Discussion in 'Chargers Fan Forum' started by Concudan, Feb 4, 2011.

  1. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    take it for what it is worth. I think the Spanos' have shown they really want to stay in SD. Unfortunately, SD has never reciprocated (City Counsil-wise).
     
  2. DenverBolt67

    DenverBolt67 BoltTalker

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    I agree, I also don't think they are too far from having to throw in the towel. I personally don't see a ballot measure passing. Not in this economy and not without outright support from city officials.
     
  3. Ride The Lightning

    Ride The Lightning Join the Dark Side, we have cookies.

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    What I read: The Chargers have done as much as they can and they are fed up with the city doing sh*t.
     
  4. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Yeah, pretty much...
     
  5. robdog

    robdog Code Monkey Staff Member Administrator

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    Well, who is driving to LA???

    Party at my house before the game!
     
  6. DenverBolt67

    DenverBolt67 BoltTalker

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    My in-laws live in LA, only about 2 miles from the City of Industry site, so that is the site I would be rooting for. But I think the Downtown option would be much more likely to receive league support
     
  7. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    fuk LA and whatever team moves there

    see the Clippers
     
  8. Pointyearedog

    Pointyearedog I love the smell of football in the morning.

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    I believe the dialogue in that conversation had quite a few more words than what was shown at the start of this thread. And what I got out of that article was that the commissioner at least had the guts to say that he wants to see the Chargers continue to be a part of San Diego. What surprises me is that the owners of the Chargers have not given the fans here any vote of confidence that they want to see the team stay in San Diego. Team Spanos has never made any kind statement like the one Mr. Goodell made this afternoon.

    Pointy
     
  9. MasterOfPuppets

    MasterOfPuppets Charger fan since 1979

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    the Chargers are in a tough spot, they have to make the city believe they might leave if there's no cooperation from the city, but they have to make the fans think that they are staying
     
  10. Retired Catholic

    Retired Catholic BoltTalker

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    This process has been set back by at least a year, since I have grave doubts about the prospects of a full season, or any season. I will not watch scab games. I guess I will get back into watching college football, especially if the Aztecs get more local exposure for their away games.
     
  11. Pointyearedog

    Pointyearedog I love the smell of football in the morning.

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    Here is a lot more about Goodell's speech:

    Goodell Gives State Of The NFL Address

    NFL commissioner Roger Goodell conducted his annual state of the league address today, answering a wide-ranging battery of questions at the Super Bowl.

    Here are some of his key responses, including answers about the labor strife surrounding the league, in a transcript provided by the NFL:

    Roger, this week in the Associated Press poll, [it] found that 27 percent of the respondents, only 27 percent, favor an 18-game regular season schedule and when asked if they are NFL fans, only 18 percent say they strongly favor that. Dan Rooney’s also said he sees no reason to go to an 18-game schedule. My question is: How much feedback have you gotten from owners about the 18-game schedule and how much feedback have you gotten from the fans and the public about an 18-game schedule?

    “We started this with the fans. The fans have clearly stated that they don’t like the quality of our preseason. As you know, our structure is a 20-game format. We have four preseason games and 16 regular-season games. Repeatedly, the fans have said the quality of the preseason doesn’t meet NFL standards. That is one of the basis on which we started to look at the 18-and-two concept, by taking two of those low quality, non-competitive games and turn those into quality, competitive games that the fans want to see; they want to support. I talk to fans all the time. I get that feedback from them, including season-ticket holders who are the ones who are going to those preseason games and paying for those preseason games. I feel an obligation to make sure we are doing the best we can to present the best football, and that includes [asking] how do we make the preseason as effective as possible and the regular season as effective as possible, and I believe we are on the right track to get that done.”

    With the possibility or probability of a lockout, what is your message to Indianapolis with the Super Bowl next year, whether it will be impacted and if it is, is there a Plan B? Do they go to the next in line, the end of line? What happens to that Super Bowl?

    “The message to our friends in Indianapolis is to continue their planning. We believe we are going to be playing there in the Super Bowl, and we believe it is going to be a great community for us to be in. It takes a lot of work as you know to have these events and I’m confident that all that planning will be done in the best possible way. Our focus is on trying to get an agreement done and get it done without any disruption, whether it be to the Super Bowl, or the preseason or regular season. We want to get this deal done in the next few weeks. That’s where our focus is, Mike.”

    You touched on this a little bit in your opening marks, but if I could get you to expand on it a little. We know of the ice storm in Atlanta and how the Super Bowl has never gone back there. This is obviously the biggest stadium in the NFL, and it’s going to be a financial windfall for the NFL. Will the weather at all, even though you don’t have a vote on this, will the weather at all affect future bids for Dallas/Ft. Worth?

    “You know there are a number of factors that our owners take into consideration when they make the decision of where to have the Super Bowl. They each have their priorities. I think the stadium is a priority that is consistent across all 32 clubs, because quite frankly that’s our stage. You are going to be playing – we’re going to be playing, and you’re going to be seeing the Super Bowl from one of the great stadiums in the world. I think that will demonstrate the importance of having great facilities for all of our games, including the Super Bowl. And the fact that it can handle the weather by closing the roof is a benefit in this case. As I say, I think this community has done an extraordinary job under some very difficult circumstances that are across this country today. There are very few communities anywhere right now who have not been impacted by this storm. This community has pulled together and done an extraordinary job and my hat’s off to them.”

    The position of the ownership in the labor dispute seems to be that since the 2006 season the players have gotten too great a share of revenues. Yesterday DeMaurice Smith said, I quote, ‘The undeniable fact is the share of all revenues that has gone to all players has gone down since the 2006 deal.’ How do you explain the difference in those two sets of facts?

    “I think one is a fact and one isn’t. In fact, if you want to deal with facts, the president of the union just in the last week said that the players got a great deal in 2006, and that clearly is indicating that the pendulum has shifted too far in one direction. And in any agreement, you want to have a fair agreement. You want to make sure that it’s fair to the clubs. You want to make sure it’s fair to the players, but allow our great game to grow. Since 2006, we have not built a new stadium, and that is an issue for us. You will point to Dallas. You will point to New York. You’ll point to the renovations in Kansas City, but those were all in the ground or on their way. This agreement needs to be addressed so we can make the kinds of investments that grow this game and make it great for our fans.”

    You said you talked to two dozen non-Steeler players and none of them supported (Ben) Roethlisberger. Mike Tomlin said, ‘Why would you expect non-Steeler players to support him.’ What was the point of those conversations with those non-Steeler players?

    “The context of that entire discussion, as you know, Sports Illustrated did a profile piece and in the context of that Peter King was asking, ‘How do you go about making these decisions’ and I said, ‘You talk to a lot of people.’ You try to get input, and one of the most important inputs for me is players. How do players perceive this? How does it reflect on players as a group? What should be done? I am not taking a vote. I’m not allowing them to make decisions on what the discipline is against other players. I am well aware of that issue, but I do believe in seeking out input to try to make a fair decision that considers all aspects, and that’s what we were trying to do.”

    You said that Bill Belichick deceived you. Did you follow up on that or just let it pass?

    “No, I didn’t do anything further with that.”

    If there is not a new labor deal by March 4, or substantial progress toward one that leads to that deadline being pushed back, will the owners lock out the players? And does the owners decision on a lockout depend, in any way, on whether the union decertifies or not?

    “There were a lot of questions in there, Mark (Maske). I guess the first one is that we have not made any determinations of what will happen on March 4th. The ownership is completely focused on getting an agreement that works and is fair to the players and the clubs. That’s their focus right now. They are prepared for every outcome, as they should be. That is only smart negotiations, and I assume the union is doing the same. We have to focus on making sure we get an agreement that works for everyone. At that point in time, if we are not successful in getting an agreement, I’m sure a lot of steps are going to be taken, which is why the window of opportunity is in the next few weeks to get an agreement that works for everybody.”

    If it’s not a good value for the fans and it could threaten players’ welfare over time, why not be a little fan friendly and maybe knock down the prices for the two preseason games, each home game? Don’t make them regular season prices and they’ll get their bang for their buck and the players will stay healthier:

    “I think the first thing you started off with, I believe you said, ‘If it’s not good value for the fans.’ I would disagree. I think fans, when they understand that you are going to take two preseason games and turn them into regular season games, they do see value in that. They do see the fact that you are improving the quality of what they are paying for. That’s what we are trying to do, increase that value. Everybody - everybody, including people in this room - has been impacted by the economy, and we are trying to find out how do we create more value in everything we offer our fans. Whether it be new stadiums, whether it be on television, whether it be on our merchandise that we offer, you have to create value in this environment. We look at every aspect of that. We have looked at every alternative that you’ve mentioned there, but what you also want to do, is you want to continue to grow the pie. That’s good for everybody. It’s good for the game, it’s good for the players and it’s good for the clubs, so you keep looking for ways in which you can grow revenue, grow the pie, that’s good for everybody.”

    On the CBA front, if this gets past March 3, March 4, and we get into some kind of a work stoppage, the team and the players make most of their money from August or September through the rest of the season. Why would we expect there to be a deal done any time before August?

    “David, if we’re unsuccessful in getting an agreement by March 4, I expect that the uncertainty will continue, which will be bad for our partners. It will be bad for the players, it will be bad for the clubs. That uncertainty will lead to a reduction, potentially, in revenue, and, when that revenue decreases, there will be less for us to share. That will just make it harder to make an agreement. So, what we have to do is remove the uncertainty. A series of things will happen in March if we’re not successful. There will not be free agency, which will impact on the players. There will be a number of things that I’m sure both sides will consider, that, strategically, I believe will move us away from the negotiating table rather than toward the negotiating table. I have frequently said, and I will be as clear as I can on this, this will get resolved at the negotiating table. All of the other public relations, litigation strategies, congressional strategies, this is about a negotiation. We have to address the issues and find solutions.

    The Collective Bargaining Agreement doesn’t expire for another month, and already teams like the Chiefs and the Jets seem to be using the possibility of a lockout as an excuse to reduce their work staffs. The Chiefs recently let go 11 people, including three employees that had been with the organization for a combined 72 years. Do you have a problem with any of this, and are you concerned with how it makes a league that is producing record revenues look when it lets paycheck-to-paycheck people go like this?

    “I don’t think anyone is using anything as an excuse, Paul. When you make decisions on personnel – and I’ve had to make them in our organization two years ago, when we were going through some difficult times in the economy – there are still difficult economic challenges out there. All of our clubs, and the league, and every other business, including businesses that you all are associated with, have to make very tough decisions in this kind of environment. When you’re dealing with employees and their future, there is nothing harder to do. But the reality is, this is a tough environment out there. We want to make sure that we are making smart decisions for our employees, our players, our clubs, for the long term, and make sure that we can continue to have a successful product. No one likes to see our employees let go, Paul. It’s a very, very difficult thing.”

    Jerry Jones said that he thinks that urgency is necessary to get a deal done in this type of situation. DeMaurice Smith followed that up yesterday, saying he views March 4 as a hard deadline. Do you see it that way and do you sense the proper sense of urgency is out there on both sides right now to get something done that’s fair on both sides?

    “I frequently said that I think that March 4 is a very critical date, because, again, a lot of different strategies will take place if we’re not successful in getting an agreement by that time. We need to have intensive, round-the-clock negotiations to address the issues and find solutions. If we’re committed to doing that, I think we can be successful. But we have to demonstrate that commitment and get to work.”

    Do you feel that sense of urgency is there now, or do you still need to find it?

    “I can assure you that I have that sense of urgency, and I believe that both sides do. And I’m glad to hear you say that DeMaurice (Smith) said that yesterday.”

    Just a follow up on the 18-game schedule. From the standpoint of the owners and the League, is the 18-game regular-season schedule, does it have to be in the next CBA? In other words, is it a deal breaker?

    “Sal, there are no deal breakers. We need to sit down and have a healthy negotiation about how we address the issues that we have. There are many different ways of addressing the issues that we have, but the only way to do that is by sitting down and making sure everyone understands what those challenges are and addressing them in an appropriate fashion. So in negotiations, there’s give and take and that’s how you get to an agreement that makes the game better. That’s our entire focus. How do we make the game better? The status quo is not acceptable. We have to address these issues going forward.”

    Earlier this week Anschutz Entertainment Group announced a 30-year, $700 million naming rights deal with Farmer’s Insurance. Keeping in mind as you mentioned there have been no stadium started since 2006, can you look ahead and tell me what a naming rights’ deal, which would be the largest in history, would mean to bringing football back to Los Angeles, and is this a game changer?

    “Well Sam, I think it’s obviously a positive development because it’s an important revenue stream, but even with that positive development the financing of the stadium in Los Angeles is still a very difficult proposition. We have to get the Collective Bargaining Agreement addressed in such a way as to make it so that it is a smart investment that that can be financed so that we can create the kind of economic activity in Los Angeles that I believe can happen if we’re successful, whether it be in downtown or out in the City of Industry. There are some great opportunities for us to continue to grow the game, but we have to recognize that cost is associated with that and address it in a way that incentivizes everyone to make those kind of investments. I think this is a positive thing for the league, for the players, for the game, and for, most importantly, our fans in Southern California.”

    (from Bengals WR Chad Ochocinco) You represent 32 NFL owners and right now I’m standing here representing over 1800 NFL players. We want to know one thing, seriously. I don’t want the politically correct answer as far as it will be done in a week. Do you know how far away we are from getting a deal realistically done? What is the real time-table for us really getting it done? Because I see a lot of things being prepared on your guys’ end – you guys are somewhat preparing for a lockout.

    “As I said before, both sides are going to be prepared for every outcome. The commitment on behalf of the ownership is to get an agreement. We will get an agreement. That is only going to happen when there are some intensive negotiations between your union and the owners. That has to take place now. This is the window of opportunity to get this done right. Otherwise, uncertainty is going to seep into all of our operations and make it harder for everybody to reach that agreement. Right now, I would say, let’s get to work and let’s get an agreement that works for everybody.”

    I understand the CBA is important, but Michael Vick is an important player to the fans in Philadelphia. How do you feel about his progress, now that you’ve seen him back in the league for a couple of years? How concerned were you that initially he was a part of another party that was scheduled here in Dallas for the Super Bowl?

    “I spoke to Michael three times in the last two weeks about his schedule here – what he’d be doing. He has said that on numerous occasions people have been using his name about being involved in some type of party, but that he had no intention of participating in that. I am extremely proud of what Michael has done. He has taken his responsibility seriously. He has made a commitment to himself to make better decisions. He has committed to doing the right thing going forward. I think that is a great thing. We’re looking for success stories. We’re not looking for players to fail. This is a young man who made horrific mistakes. He dealt with them. He paid a very significant price, and now he is doing the right thing. I support him on that and I want to make sure he doesn’t put himself in a position where he is going to make bad decisions or bad things can happen around him. He takes that seriously also. I am frequently in contact with Michael. I want to see him continue to succeed off the field as much as on the field.”

    The NFL has come out and said that teams will be allowed to start franchising players on March 10. The union said yesterday that it will challenge those franchise tags. How will you reconcile that, and are you expecting a court battle after February 10 on the franchise issue?

    “I assume if the union does not believe that the franchise tag can be applied then they will challenge that through the normal process, and that will go through the normal process and be determined.”

    There seems to be a massive disconnect between the owners and labor, and trust seems to not exist or at least exist in a very scant amount. Why should fans trust either side when it’s looked at as billionaires arguing with millionaires?

    “I think at this point, what I hear from fans is that they just want football, and the fans aren’t forgotten here. We want to bring more football – better football – to our fans. And that’s the focus I think both sides have to keep their attention on because we need to get an agreement that works for everybody, that’s fair to everybody, but also continue the great game that we have for our fans. I think they care about just getting an agreement. They don’t care about the details. They just want to make sure that their football is going to appear on Sundays and Mondays and Thursdays. They want to make sure they have the great game they love. That’s our responsibility, and I don’t think anyone is going to feel sorry for any one of us, including yours truly, if we’re not successful at doing that.”

    When you came up here today, you talked about how the NFL had its most-watched season and you hoped for bigger, better things next year. On a personal level and looking at the CBA and everything it involves, do you reach out to anybody like a Paul Tagliabue in any type of situations? And how much do you want to avoid the blemish on your record? I know when Paul left it was a big boost to him to leave the NFL without that void and working stoppage. For you on a personal level, what do you think about that?

    “As I said earlier when we were talking about it, I believe you need to talk to a lot of people in this job. You represent a lot of constituents and a lot of perspectives: the fans, the clubs, the players, our business partners. You need to understand what’s happening out there and you need to listen. The number one thing we need to do is listen to one another and understand the issues and figure out how to address them. I am not worried about legacies or how I am going to be perceived; I’m worried about doing the right thing for this game, for our fans, and for the long term. This isn’t about the next three months; this is about the next 10 years. This is about our game and making sure we get an agreement in place that is going to ensure the success of our game going forward.”

    This is where Goodell makes his comments after staff from XX1090AM asked him if he thought the Chargers may make a move to LA

    Given San Diego’s inability to make any progress on a stadium and the fact that 90 miles up north you have progress – at least you have progress with AEG and Farmers Insurance. Is there any reason to believe the Chargers are not headed for a move to L.A. and is it more important for the NFL to have a team in Los Angeles than keep a team in San Diego?

    “The second part of your question, we want to keep our teams where they are. The Chargers have been committed to getting a solution in their stadium in San Diego for, I believe, well over eight years now. They’ve been working on different alternatives. They’ve spent an extraordinary amount of time and resources to try and develop those solutions and they still continue to this day to do that. They want to be in San Diego. They want the Chargers to be in San Diego, and so does the NFL. But, we need to find a solution to the stadium issue in San Diego.”

    You said earlier today that in negotiations there has to be give and take. What are the owners going to give in this negotiation? Jeff Pash told reporters earlier this week that you made concessions. Did you make any concessions on the economic issues? And yesterday Kevin Mawae said you have to open your books to get this deal done, for them to take this kind of pay cut. Are you willing to move on those issues?

    “Well Liz, you’ve raised several issues in there. We have to get beyond this negotiating ploy of opening the books, because that’s all it is. The players have more than sufficient information to understand why the economics of this deal do not work. They recognized that 12 months ago when I was sitting at the table and they said, ‘We recognize the clubs are being squeezed.’ Kevin Mawae, himself, said just last week, ‘It’s been a great deal in 2006 for the players.’ They recognize why the economics aren’t working. It doesn’t pay us any service to sit here and talk about where they give and take. We’re not going to negotiate this at a press conference, but I can assure you that the owners are willing to have a give and take and I believe the players are willing to have a give and take to find solutions that work.”

    A few Steelers players have been somewhat critical of the NFL recently in their administration of discipline regarding helmet-to-helmet hits, and specifically some of the ambiguity regarding that administration. What will the NFL do in the future to perhaps provide some clarity for teams?

    “As commissioner, I have to take ultimate responsibility for making sure that the integrity of the game and the safety of our game are going to be implemented in a consistent and fair way. That’s my responsibility. We will continue to work with the Competition Committee. We will continue to work with the players who contribute into the Competition Committee, their input, in trying to help the players, the coaches, all of our clubs and the general public understand the techniques that we are looking to eliminate from the game, but also the techniques that we think should be used. This has been discussed every offseason by our Competition Committee and our football people, and the rules are determined by 32 clubs. There were no rule changes this year in the season. It was made in the offseason and they were made by the collective 32. The rules apply to 32 teams and every player in the league, no exceptions. I’m the commissioner for the entire league, for 32 teams. Everyone’s going to play by the same rules. We will work harder to make sure they understand the appropriate techniques, and I think people have adjusted. If you look at the game this year, they adjusted. The players adjusted, the teams adjusted and the game of football was extraordinary, and it was safer.”

    If you do choose to lower your salary to a dollar, do you have a particular part-time job in mind to make ends meet? And secondly, do you worry about a backlash from the fans towards the popularity of the game, or do you feel like it’s more immune from that?

    “No, I do not think we’re immune from that. I have said repeatedly, the fans want football. If we are not successful in reaching an agreement, that will be toward the commissioner, towards the clubs, towards the players, everybody involved. That’s why I think collectively, we have to work and make a commitment to get something done that makes sense. I don’t want my salary to go to a dollar. My wife doesn’t want my salary to go to a dollar. But the reality of it is, it’s a collective sacrifice. It’s a bad outcome if we’re not able to reach that agreement, and it should affect everybody in the league, including yours truly. We have to make sure we work as hard as we can to avoid it and get something done as quickly as possible.”

    When you say that there will not be free agency on March 4th without a new labor deal, aren’t you essentially saying there will be a lockout if there isn’t a deal by March 4th? If not how else would free agency be delayed?

    “If I misspoke, I apologize, but I said if we are not successful by March 4th, a number of things will happen. When that happens, one of them would be that there wouldn’t be free agency. There are close to 500 players that would qualify for free agency who won’t be free agents. There are enough incentives for all of us to get to the table and get this deal done right.”

    Do you think it is time for the Rooney Rule to be tweaked? It has done, obviously some good things but you had some assistants complaining about the interviews. Owners knowing who they want to hire and some assistants will play the role as the good soldier to just come in maybe for rewards and later on. Do you think it is time to re-look at it?

    “Anything can be improved. I think that the Rooney Rule has been extraordinarily successful. It has made significant changes, not just in the NFL, and I said this to the Fritz Pollard Alliance last night. It has made the NFL better. We have had better people that have been exposed, given an opportunity, and succeeded in the game of football because they have considered a diverse slate of candidates. I think that is great for the game of football. The Rooney Rule has gone beyond the game of football. We get calls frequently from other industries, saying, ‘Can we adopt the Rooney Rule? Would you allow us to use the Rooney Rule in our industry because it has had a great impact?’ I think you can tweak anything. I think you can improve anything and we will continue to look at that and see what we can do. I think just two years ago we extended it beyond just coaching to the top football personnel. We use it in the league office for every one of our positions. We do not make a hire in the league office without considering a diverse slate of candidates. I think that is the right thing to do and the best thing to do. We will always look to improve.”

    Pointy
     
  12. Lancer 1

    Lancer 1 Eternal Optimist

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    There won't be any scab games to watch...what is looming is a possibility of the owners locking out the players, not a player strike. A strike would've likely led to scab games, but if the owners lock the players out, we just won't have NFL football at all until the players start missing paychecks & eventually cave.
     
  13. HEXEDBOLT

    HEXEDBOLT Don't like it, lump it!!!

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    the NFL as a whole is standing on fragile ground both players and owners if a lockout/strike occurs. The MLB suffered major damage from the strikes and lost many fans, me included, for the BS of the rich getting richer. To this day I don't view BB games nor do I keep up with the game through the box scores, it was damaged beyond repair for me and football may go down that same road.

    Pro football is what it is from it's humble beginning. The guy that busted his *** all week could afford to go to a game and forget the real wold for a few hours. Hell, pro football wasn't even taken serious by the elite of society at it's inception, college ball was the sport to watch. I can still remember the Lance Alworth dry cleaners the guy built to supplement his income, there was one at first and main in El Cajon although they failed the game still reflected the average Joe, Today it's all about the bling.

    I'm tired of hearing these billion/millionaires whine about more money, how about giving something back to the FANS, the very people who made it possible for this game to grow and become what it is. The only way the owners and players will get the message is from empty seats. NASCAR got it and are working to fix the problem and it is the most fan friendly sport there is, no asses in the stands speaks louder than words.
     
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  14. JohnnyX

    JohnnyX Hall of Fame

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    I'm sure this was said to every team that has moved before it moved. Nothing big.
     
  15. SDRaiderH8er

    SDRaiderH8er Well-Known Member

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    I am glad they moved up there, that way I do not have to support them. I went to several of thier games when they called San Diego home.
     
  16. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    me too. Made me a Laker fan. At least I've had one team win it all.

    well, except for the Sockers. I loved them
     
  17. Old School SD Fan

    Old School SD Fan Unhappy Camper

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    Everything is spin at this juncture. It is in the NFL and Spanos' interests to portray the team as committed to SD, the speeches mean nothing. I suspect the NFL is cognizant of this being the worst economy since the depression, you won't see publicly funded new digs popping up anywhere until things materially improve.

    LA is the only game in town for moving the Chargers and will be for the next 5+ years as we slowly drag ourselves away from the economic abyss.
     
  18. SDRaiderH8er

    SDRaiderH8er Well-Known Member

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    I quit following basketball, I went to many a Sockers game, the joint was a rockin back in the day.
     
  19. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Why can't some billionaire offer the deal in SD. Selling the naming rights might have some positive impact for the bonehead politicians and faithful fans of SD.

    no doubt. along with the Gulls, those were some good times to be at the Sports Arena.

    Is that thing still there?
     
  20. CraziFuzzy

    CraziFuzzy BoltTalker

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    For starters, there aren't any billionaires interested in San Diego. There's also the population density issue. There just aren't enough PEOPLE in San Diego for them to realistically think they'll be able to fill a stadium for the next 15 years.

    That said, I hope the AEG naming deal is just a way to try to discredit Roski and the industry site. I would hate to see the AEG plan go through. It will be a terrible site for ANY football team, especially the chargers. There isn't enough parking for the staples center and convention center now (most park on the street/private lots 10-15 minutes walk away). Then there is the whole new LA Live and Nokia theater.. each of which added no real amount of parking. Now you're going to try to put football stadium there as well? There will never be any tailgating at the games at the downtown site. period.
    [​IMG]

    Industry, on the other hand, is planned to have a 25,000 space parking lot. Perfect for real football games. It also moves the games more into the center of the 'football fan' population circle. (face it, urban areas don't hold as many football fans as suburbs do).
    [​IMG]

    there's also a big push to classify the new industry stadium for MLS and World Cup soccer, meaning the payoff is MUCH greater.
     
  21. Aggieman

    Aggieman I bleed blue and gold

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    I don't know, the AEG design looks so much more modern. It's right in the middle of Downtown LA which loves having the Staples Center but would love accommodating a football game crowd. Tailgating? Forget it, but I can assure you vendors wouldn't think twice about getting some real estate on that plaza.

    But Industry would better suited for a grand 2014 opening as it'll take less work to get the entire area 100% ready. It'd cater heavily to football fans with easy access from the freeway and ample parking. The 'Los Angeles' sign built into the stadium would be iconic. I favor the Industry move, because of fan-friendliness over easy profitability. AEG unnecessarily complicated things by proposing their own project. Now the two billionaires will fight over who can prove their plan farther along in becoming a reality. Oh brother...

    If the Chargers moved into Industry, they get a new stadium, the LA TV market becomes their primary market while San Diego remains a secondary one, the stewardship of Ed Roski in business negotiations, and all that it is abandoned is a name and site in San Diego. If they allow someone else to claim the site, then that team gets the new stadium, the LA market, the SD market as secondary (ugh, LA Jaguar games bumping San Diego games. How could that possibly be good for SD fans?) Can Spanos go toe-to-toe with Roski to lure competitors in supporting San Diego? The writing's on the wall; it is in the Chargers' best interest to move to Industry.
     
  22. CoronaDoug

    CoronaDoug Well-Known Member

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    Just remember that if the Chargers do leave SD it will be the end of the NFL in SD forever.
    It is not like Baltimore moving to Indy or Cleveland moving to Baltimore. These cities actually supported the NFL and rallied for a franchise in their cities.
     
  23. Aggieman

    Aggieman I bleed blue and gold

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    ^
    It's a whole 'nother situation. Industry's right next door so it's not like the Chargers would lose everything they had in SD.

    Any TV market that penetrates up to 75 miles from the stadium is deemed a secondary market. San Diego's does. All away games and most home games would be broadcast in San Diego. It's also less than two hours from San Diego, so the NFL assumes that fans in San Diego will still journey to the new stadium. Even if San Diego "rallied" for a franchise, the NFL wouldn't care.
     
  24. scratchnz

    scratchnz BoltTalker

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    Great post brother!
     
  25. SDBoltzFan

    SDBoltzFan BoltTalker

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    Not only would I not support an LA team, I sure would not sit in LA traffic to go see the team even if I decided I could support them. I stay away from LA traffic like the plague. Anytime I have to through that area I time it to hit as little traffic as possible (which is pretty hard to do). The time sitting in traffic to and from the game would ruin the whole experience for me.
     
  26. Savage Lizard

    Savage Lizard Charger fan at 7000'

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    Yeah, but it's still NASCAR.
     
  27. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Hey SL!
     
  28. SDRaiderH8er

    SDRaiderH8er Well-Known Member

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    2 hours from San Diego? When was the last time you drove 5 North or South on a Sunday? 4 - 5 might be more accurate. And thats in each direction.
     
  29. SDRaiderH8er

    SDRaiderH8er Well-Known Member

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    is turning left a sport?
     
  30. HEXEDBOLT

    HEXEDBOLT Don't like it, lump it!!!

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    At least it isn't tennis or golf or how about bowling, wait all those games are played with balls. That's right games played with a ball are not sport's they're games, DUH.
     

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