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Ball Watchers Anonymous

Discussion in 'Chargers Fan Forum' started by Concudan, Jul 23, 2007.

  1. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    :icon_eek: :icon_rofl: :icon_tease:
     
  2. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    Yeah well piss on you too. :lol:
     
  3. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Fullback.
    In American football, a fullback (FB) is a position in the offensive backfield. Traditionally, the duties of a fullback are split between power running and blocking for both the quarterback and other running backs.

    Many of the great runners of the history of American football have been fullbacks, notably Jim Brown and Larry Csonka, but in recent years the position has evolved to be more a blocker than a runner, with occasional pass-catching duties. The remaining prominent fullbacks in the NFL, such as Mike Alstott, are typically employed for breaking through tight defensive alignments, often in short-yardage situations, or for screen passes. As a result, fullbacks are typically less known for speed and agility than for muscularity and the ability to avoid being tackled by knocking down defenders.


    Criticism of position
    Some fans and experts take issue with the position because fullbacks are often wasted as an extra running back or additional blocker. Often, critics want the fullback more involved in the running game. Special plays designed for the fullback (or H-back formation) were popularized by Coach Joe Gibbs. There is growing criticism that at the college and pro levels, capable white tailbacks are forced to bulk up and become fullbacks, because the common conception is that white tailbacks do not possess the natural speed and elusiveness of black athletes needed to succeed as a running back in the higher levels of the game.

    The fullback position has become somewhat of a cult phenomenon with the Madden video game series. Many gameplayers will call the play outloud before the snap while near the goal line and affectionately say they are going to "feature the fullback".
     
  4. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    H-Back
    An H-Back, also known as F-Back, is an offensive position in American football. The position is a hybrid of a fullback and a tight end. The position was made notable in the NFL by the Washington Redskins under head coach Joe Gibbs who ran a two tight end system. The position was named F-Back when used later in Norv Turner's offensive system.

    In the Redskins offensive system, the H-back is asked to block, pass protect, and run receiving routes from multiple sets. This compares to the standard tight end which was used primarily as an extra blocker on Washington offensive line. The H-back can line up in the backfield, on the line, or is put into motion. Due to the complexity of the position, a thorough knowledge of the offense is desirable in an H-back. The position, indeed the entire two tight end offense, was created by Gibbs as a direct response to Lawrence Taylor, the New York Giants dominant linebacker.[1][2] As Gibbs stated, "[w]e had to try in some way have a special game plan just for Lawrence Taylor. Now you didn't do that very often in this league but I think he's one person that we learned the lesson the hard way. We lost ball games
     
  5. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Guard

    In American and Canadian football, a guard (G) is a player that lines up between the center and the tackles on the offensive line of a football team.


    The guard's job is to protect the quarterback from the oncoming defensive line and linebackers during pass plays, as well as creating openings (holes) for the running backs to head through. Guards perform speed blocking and "pulling"--sprinting out in front of a running back in order to block for him. Guards are automatically considered ineligible receivers, so they cannot touch a pass, unless it is to recover a fumble or is first touched by a defender or eligible receiver.

    Guards, like other linemen, today are often over 300 pounds. Currently, the heaviest starting guard is Toniu Fonoti of the Miami Dolphins, weighing 350 pounds. The lightest is Pete Kendall at 280 pounds (formerly of the Seattle Seahawks and Arizona Cardinals, now playing for the New York Jets). To date, no lineman over 300 pounds has ever been elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame, but linemen of this mass have become prevalent only since the mid-1980s.

    In his book with Dick Schaap titled Instant Replay, Green Bay Packers' right guard Jerry Kramer wrote about the trials and tribulations of an NFL guard in 1967, the final year he was coached by Vince Lombardi. Lombardi himself was a right guard (undersized, even in his era, at 5'8", 185 lb.) for Fordham's famed Seven Blocks of Granite in the mid 1930s. Kramer was perhaps the finest pulling guard of all time. Teamed with left guard Fuzzy Thurston, this tandem was the cornerstone of the famed Packer Sweep of the 1960s. Kramer also received notoriety because of his key block in the final seconds (with center Ken Bowman) on Dallas' Jethro Pugh in the Ice Bowl, securing the Packers' still unmatched third consecutive NFL championship.
     
  6. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Tackle

    In American and Canadian football, offensive tackles (OT, T) are a part of the offensive line. Like other offensive linemen, their job is to block: to physically keep defenders away from the offensive player who has the football.

    A tackle is the strong position on the offensive line. They power their blocks with quick steps and maneuverability. The tackles are mostly in charge of the outside protection. If the tight end goes out for a pass, the tackle must cover everyone that his guard doesn’t, plus whoever the tight end isn’t covering. Usually they defend against defensive ends. In the NFL, tackles, like most offensive linemen, are all well over six feet four inches in height and 300 pounds in weight.


    Right tackle
    The right tackle (RT) is usually the team's best run blocker. Most running plays are towards the strong side (the side with the tight end) of the offensive line. Consequently the right tackle will face the defending team's best run stoppers. He must be able to gain traction in his blocks so that the running back can find a hole to run through. Designated as the left and right tackles, they begin each play at the line of scrimmage, to the outside of the guards and to the inside of any tight ends or wide receivers that might be in the play. On running plays, they usually push defenders away to clear a path (or "hole") through which the running back can carry the ball. On passing plays, they usually obstruct onrushing defenders from reaching and sacking the quarterback. They are ineligible receivers, meaning they are not allowed to catch passes.


    Left tackle
    The left tackle (LT) is usually the team's best pass blocker. Of the two tackles, the left tackles will often have better footwork and agility than the right tackle in order to counter-act the pass rush of defensive ends. Most quarterbacks are right-handed and in order to throw, they stand with their left shoulders facing downfield, closer to the line of scrimmage. Thus, they turn their backs to defenders coming from the left side, creating a vulnerable blind spot that the left tackle must protect.

    A 2006 book by Michael Lewis, The Blind Side: Evolution of a Game, shed much light on the workings of the left tackle position. The book discusses how the annual salary of left tackles in the NFL skyrocketed in the mid-90's. Premier left tackles are now highly sought after commodities, and are often the second highest paid players on a roster after the quarterback.

    Notable left tackles currently playing in the NFL include Walter Jones, Jonathan Ogden, John Tait, and Orlando Pace.
     
  7. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Center

    Center (C) is a position in American football and Canadian football (spelled centre in Canadian English). In modern professional football, centers are usually the smallest offensive linemen, but this is not to say that they are unimposing. An average NFL center would weigh in at over 300 lbs (130kg) and stand over 6 feet (180cm) tall.

    The center is at the center of the offensive line, and it is the center who passes (or "snaps") the ball between his legs to the quarterback at the start of each play.

    Centers play an integral part of the offensive line and act as the primary protector of the quarterback after the snap. The center is often referred to as "the smartest person on the field next to the quarterback", in the sense that the center acts as the line's "mind". Before the snap, the center is given the responsibility of assessing the likely action of the defensive team (based on his knowledge of their defensive schemes, as well as the placement and stance of players on the field) and will then often adjust the blocking assignments of all the offensive linemen and the backfield by communicating using audible and visual signals referred to as "line calls".

    On most plays, the center will snap the ball directly into the quarterback's hands. In a shotgun formation, the center snaps the ball to the quarterback lined up several yards behind him. In punt and field goal formations, the center also snaps the ball several yards behind him to the punter or holder on the field goal unit. Because bad snaps can ruin special teams plays and cause turnovers, some teams have a center who is specifically trained for snapping the ball in punt and field goal formations. This player is often referred to as the team's long snapper. Also, it must be noted that the Center does not have to snap the ball to the quarterback, holder, or punter. He is allowed to snap the ball to anyone behind him. Because of this, some plays involve snaps directly to running backs instead of the player generally expected to receive the snap, hoping to fool the defense.


    After the snap, the center must block defensive players from reaching the ball carrier (on running plays) or the quarterback (on passing plays). On passing plays in particular, the center often must block blitzing defensive players.

    In special teams situations, the center is referred to as a "long snapper," who snaps the ball with two hands to a punter standing approximately 12-14 yards behind him, or to the holder for the placekicker, kneeling approximately 7 yards behind him. These long snappers are often players particularly talented at performing these snaps, and are not necessarily the same center used on other plays. In fact, professional football teams may carry a player on their roster for the sole or primary purpose of long snapping.

    Although the quarterback commands the ball, it is the center's snap that renders the ball in play; the defensive line may not cross the line of scrimmage until the center snaps the football. An astute center can help draw an opposing team offside prior to the snap or potentially trick the other team into a penalty by quickly snapping the ball while the opposing team attempts to substitute players.

    Notable centers in the NFL include Olin Kreutz of the Chicago Bears, Jeff Saturday of the Indianapolis Colts and Tom Nalen of the Denver Broncos. In college football, the Dave Rimington Trophy is awarded annually to the nation's most outstanding center.
     
  8. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Running Back

    A running back (RB) is the position of a player on an American or Canadian football team who lines up in the offensive backfield. There are usually one or two running backs on the field for a given play, depending on the offensive formation. A running back may be a halfback (HB for short, also called a tailback) or a fullback (FB). (In Canadian football, there is also a position called slotback. In American football, a player is occasionally referred to as an H-Back or an F-Back; this means that the player plays a position that is a hybrid of running back and tight end.) While a fullback is technically a running back, in modern parlance the terms "running back" and "RB" are frequently used to refer only to halfbacks.

    Halfback/tailback
    The halfback or tailback position is one of the more glamorous positions on the field, and is commonly viewed as a requirement for a team's success. They are responsible for carrying the ball on the majority of running plays, and may frequently be used as a receiver on short passing plays. Occasionally, they line up as additional wide receivers. When not serving either of these functions, the primary responsibility of a halfback is to aid the offensive linemen in blocking, either to protect the quarterback or another player carrying the football. On some rare occasions, running backs are used to pass the ball on a halfback option play or halfback pass.

    No position in American football can perform his duties successfully without the help of other players. Like the wide receiver, who generally cannot make big plays without the quarterback passing to him (with the exception of the end-around play), the running back needs good blocking from the offensive line to successfully gain yardage. Also, a running back will generally have more rushing attempts than a receiver will have receptions. This is mainly because, in a reception, a receiver will average, generally, from 10 to 20 yards, which is 2 to 4 times the average of a, good, 5 yard run. That's why running backs, with a lot of carries, will have 30 rushing attempts, while receivers, with a lot of yards, will have 10 receptions. A large part of the running game relies on the offensive line, which must block for the running back, providing him with holes in the defense to run through.


    Fullback
    Main article: Fullback (American football)
    In the college and professional ranks, fullbacks carry the ball infrequently. Currently, they are primarily used to aid the offensive linemen in blocking. On most running plays, the fullback leads the halfback, attempting to block potential tacklers before they reach the ball carrier. Also, fullbacks are sometimes used in passing plays, although they typically protect the quarterback. Fullbacks are technically running backs, but today the term is usually used in referring to the halfback or tailback. Although fullbacks currently are rarely used as ball carriers, there was once a time when they ran the ball as frequently as running backs. In high school football, where the offenses are more simple and player sizes vary greatly, fullbacks are still frequently used as ball carriers.

    While in years past the fullback lined up on the field for almost every offensive play, teams often opt to replace the fullback with an additional wide receiver or a tight end in modern football. Fullbacks in the National Football League rarely get to carry or catch the ball since they are used almost exclusively as blockers. Their talent and value to a team is usually judged by the success of the team's halfback or by how many times the team's quarterback is sacked, similar to the way offensive linemen are judged. There have been some exceptions, however. Mike Alstott of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers often carries the ball and is also used as a receiver in short pass situations. Fullbacks are also still used occasionally as rushers on plays when a short gain is needed for a first-down, as they are large and powerful and therefore good for breaking through the line for a short distance.


    Characteristics of a running back

    Height
    There is a great diversity in those who play at the running back position. At one extreme are smaller, agile players, such as Barry Sanders, who stood at only 5 ft 8 in, and Maurice Jones-Drew, at 5 ft 7 in. These running backs are usually scat backs, or fast, elusive running backs. However, Maurice Jones-Drew is also known for his powerful running style in addition to his speed, despite his height. At the other extreme are bigger, stronger players, such as Jerome Bettis, "The Bus", who, at his retirement in 2006 weighed almost 260 lb (118 kg). This kind of running back is referred to as a "power back" because they rely on their strength and size to break through defenders. They are usually slow, compared to most NFL players, and usually do not run to the outside, instead opting to run through the line. They must also be able to protect the ball well. Most successful running backs fall somewhere between these extremes, combining speed with power, such as Walter Payton.


    Receiving ability
    In addition to skill at running the ball, some running backs in the National Football League are known for their prowess at catching passes. The role of the running back as a receiver out of the backfield has expanded greatly in the NFL over the years, and a versatile running back who provides his team good running and pass-catching abilities is highly valued. On passing plays, a running back will often run a safe route, such as a hook, creating a safe target for a quarterback to throw to if all other receivers are covered. The increase in demand for running backs with good receiving abilities can be attributed to the rise in popularity of the West Coast offense and its variants, which often requires its running backs to catch passes on a regular basis. Currently there are two running backs on the NFL's list of all-time top 20 leading pass catchers, fullback Larry Centers and halfback Marshall Faulk. A good example of a dual threat running and pass catching running back is San Diego Chargers' LaDainian Tomlinson; in 2003, Tomlinson rushed for 1,645 yards and caught 100 passes for 725 yards, giving him 2,370 total yards from the line of scrimmage, and he became the first NFL player ever to rush for over 1,000 yards and catch 100 passes in a season.

    Some teams have a running back known as the "third down back", who is more skilled at catching passes than the starting running back on the team, and thus is often put in the game in third down and long situations where a pass is needed to pick up a first down, and/or is better at pass blocking or "picking up the blitz" than than the other backs as the running back is typically asked to block on passing downs. He can also be used to fool the defense by making them think he is being put into the game for a pass play, when the play is actually a run.


    Blocking
    Running backs are also required to help the offensive line in passing situations, and, in the case of the full back, running plays. Running backs will often block blitzing linebackers or safeties on passing plays when the offensive line is occupied with the defensive linemen. On running plays, the fullback will often attempt to tear a hole in the offensive line for the running back to run through. Effective blocking backs, such as Lorenzo Neal, are usually key components for a running back's success (as seen in LaDainian Tomlinson's record-breaking season in 2006).


    Goal line backs
    Many teams also have a running back designated as a "goal line back" or "short yardage specialist". This running back comes into the game in short yardage situations when the offense needs only 1 or 2 yards to get a first down. They also come into the game when the offense nears the goal-line. Normally when an offense gets inside the 5 yard line they send in their goal-line formation which usually includes 8 blockers, a quarterback, a running Back, and a fullback. The closer they are to the goal-line the more likely they are to use this formation. If a certain running back is used often near the goal-line he is called the goal-line back. Short yardage and goal-line backs are Power Backs that are not prone to fumbling. Their job is to get the first down or touchdown by muscling through or pushing a large mass of players that are being blocked without dropping the ball.


    Kick and punt returners
    A running back might be called upon to return punts and kickoffs on special teams. Although this is most often done by wide receivers and defensive backs, such as corner backs, (because they are generally the fastest players on the team), some running backs have enough speed and talent to perform this role. The NFL's current all time leading in kickoff return yards (14,014 yards) and punt return yards (4,999) is a running back, Brian Mitchell. He also gained 1,967 rushing yards, 2,336 receiving yards, and 15 fumble return yards, giving him a total of 23,330 all-purpose yards, the second most in NFL history behind Jerry Rice.
     
  9. Shamrock

    Shamrock New Member

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    Did you know .....

    Frank Leahy was the offensive line coach for that Fordham team that Lombardi played on? Leahy later became a Nat'l Champ winning head coach at Notre Dame. (also, Barron Hilton made Leahy the first General Manager of the LA Chargers).

    Lombardi's head coach at Fordham was Jim Crowley, one of the "Four Horsemen" of Notre Dame during his playing days.

    Crowley was from Green Bay, WI and his high school coach was some guy named Curly Lambeau, who would later go on to found the Packers franchise - where Lombardi achieved his fame. (.... also, Lambeau played one year at Notre Dame, in the same backfield as George Gipp.)

    Also of note, Lombardi's first college coaching job was as an assistant at Army to famed head coach Red Blaik. Lombardi replaced some guy who was moving on to become the head coach at the U. of Cincinnati. That guy's name was Sid Gillman.
     
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  10. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    I dod not know, please enlighten me more.:tup:
     
  11. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Wide Receiver

    The wide receiver (WR) position in American and Canadian football is the pass-catching specialist. Wide receivers (also referred to as wideouts or simply receivers) are among the fastest and most agile players in the game, and they are frequent highlight-reel favorites. The wide receiver position is among the most glamorous in American football because they are often responsible for the biggest plays made on by the offensive team.


    Role
    First and foremost, the wide receiver's job is to catch passes from the quarterback. On passing plays, the receiver attempts to avoid, outmaneuver, or simply outrun defenders (typically cornerbacks or safeties) in the area of his pass route. If the receiver becomes open, or has an unobstructed path to the destination of a catch, he may then become the quarterback's target. Once a pass is thrown in his direction, the receiver's goal is to first catch the ball and then attempt to run downfield. Some receivers are perceived as the deep threat because of their speed, while others may be possession receivers known for not dropping passes and converting third down situations. A receiver's height and weight also contribute to his expected role; tall in height and light in weight are advantages at the receiver position.

    Wide receivers, and the passing game generally, are particularly important when a team uses a hurry-up offense. Receivers are able to position themselves near the sideline to run out of bounds, stopping the clock at the end of the play (a failed (incomplete) pass attempt will also stop the clock).

    A wide receiver has two potential roles in running plays that range in status. Particularly in the case of draw plays, he may run a pass route with the intent of drawing off defenders. Alternately, he may block normally for the running back. Well-rounded receivers are noted for blocking defensive backs in support of teammates in addition to their pass-catching abilities.

    Sometimes wide receivers are used to run the ball, usually in some form of reverse. This can be effective because the defense usually does not expect them to be the ball carrier on running plays. Although receivers are rarely used as ball carriers, running the ball with a receiver can be extremely successful. For example, in addition to holding nearly every National Football League receiving record, wide receiver Jerry Rice also rushed the ball 87 times for 645 yards and 10 touchdowns in his 20 NFL seasons.[1]

    In some even rarer cases, receivers are used to pass the ball as part of a trick play. Although this is one of the rarest things a receiver will ever do, some receivers have proven to be capable passers. Wide receivers also serve on special teams as return men on kickoffs and punts, or as part of the hands team during onside kicks.[2][3]

    Finally, on bad passes, receivers must frequently play a defensive role by attempting to prevent an interception. If a pass is intercepted, receivers must use their speed to chase down and tackle the ball carrier to prevent him from returning the ball for a long gain or a touchdown.


    Types
    While the general fan base and most commentators use the generic term wide receiver for all such players, specific names exist for most receiver positions:

    Split end (X or SE): A receiver on the line of scrimmage, necessary to meet the rule requiring seven such players at snap. Where applicable, this receiver is on the opposite side of the tight end. The split end is farthest from center on his side of the field.[4]

    Flanker (Z or FL): A receiver lining up behind the line of scrimmage. Frequently the team's featured receiver, the flanker uses the initial buffer between himself and a defender to avoid jamming, legal contact within five yards of the line of scrimmage. The flanker is generally on the same side of the formation as a tight end. As with the split end, this receiver is the farthest player from center on his side of the field. The flanker is probably lined up just like a split end EXCEPT that he is just behind the line of scrimmage, being in the backfield and not on the line.[5]

    Slot receiver (Y or SL): A less-formal name given to receivers in addition to split ends and flankers. These receivers line up between the split end / flanker and the linemen. If aligned with a flanker, the slot receiver is usually on the line of scrimmage, and if with a split end, off the line of scrimmage. As with the flanker position, a featured receiver often takes a slot position with a split end to avoid jamming.[5]

    Slot back: A receiver lining up in the offensive back field. Canadian and Arena football allow them to take a running start at the line. They are usually larger players as they need to make catches over the middle. In American football slot backs are typically used in flexbone or other Triple Option offenses while Canadian football uses them in almost all formations.
     
  12. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Tight End

    The tight end (TE) is a position in American football on the offensive team.The tight end is the last man on the offensive line but has a slightly different build and in some cases a different role than other linemen. The role of tight ends can change depending on the philosophy of the head coach, but their main jobs are: block for the running back or quarterback who is carrying the ball, catch passes from the quarterback, and help create a stronger pocket by assisting fellow linemen in blocking during passing plays. The tight end usually lines up next to an offensive tackle, adding a man to that side of the offensive line. Therefore, whichever side the tight end is on is referred to as the "strong side", and the side without is called "weak side". Linebackers are, by extension, given "strong-side" and "weak-side" roles depending on which side of the defense they line up on; similarly, the safeties take their places in the secondary according to which side the opposing tight end is. Tight ends can also come in motion during a play.

    Blocking
    Tight ends are usually larger and slower than a wide receiver, usually weighing 230-270 lbs, compared to a 180-220 lb wide receiver, and therefore able to block more effectively.[1] It is the job of the tight end, along with the fullback, to get downfield before the tailback and open up a hole in the defense for the tailback to run through. Tight ends are used along with the offensive linemen to protect the quarterback during passing plays. Often, tight ends are employed in a fullback position called "H-Back" in which he is still beside the tackle, however off the line of scrimmage. Tight Ends may also pass block like other offensive linemen. Some teams employ tight ends solely to block; the San Diego Chargers acquired Brandon Manumanuela for that purpose.

    Joe Gibbs is credited with creation of the two tight end offense. During the 1980s Gibbs realized he needed to utilize an additional blocker to keep New York Giants premier linebacker Lawrence Taylor from disrupting the Washington Redskins offense.[2]


    Receiving
    There are plays written to take advantage of a tight end's ability to catch. Tight ends are used to exploit a defense's coverage of a wide receiver. Specifically, if a team has a star wide receiver that usually gets double-coverage from the secondary, the coach will call plays for the quarterback to throw to the tight end, as he is usually the man left uncovered in a defense. For this reason the tight end is sometimes called the quarterback's "safety valve"[3], as he is usually open for a last second throw. Tight Ends may also be called on as a last resort for a passing quarterback. Sometimes a tight end on a pass play may block for a period of time and then go out for a pass. This can confuse the defense and can take a load off a quarterback when none of his receivers are open.

    On some teams, the tight end may be so highly skilled at catching passes that he actually becomes their leading receiver, catching more passes and gaining more receiving yards than anyone else. In 2004 Tony Gonzalez led his team in receptions and receiving yards with 102 receptions for 1,258 yards. His 102 catches in 2004 are the most receptions ever recorded by a tight end in an NFL season. In 2004 Eric Johnson led the 49ers in receiving yards with 825. Also in 2004, Antonio Gates set the record for most TD's for a tight end - 13. Sometimes the acquisition of a tight end can signal a change in offensive strategy, as the player gives the coach a new weapon to work with. Some tight ends are imperative to a team's offense. In 2005, Jeremy Shockey of the New York Giants was the second highest paid player on the Giants' offense, behind quarterback Eli Manning, earnng 9.5 million dollars in salary. [4] Gonzalez, Shockey and Gates fit the mold of a new type of tight end that corresponds to a power forward in basketball; incidentally, Gates and Gonzalez played basketball in college. Their versatility and speed help create mismatches in coverage, thereby opening up a team's passing attack. The mismatch stems from the fact that the tight end is faster than the linebackers who cover him and stronger than the cornerbacks and safeties trying to tackle him. This also often leads to confusion in coverage responsibilities and allows wide receivers to get open.
     
  13. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Dimeback

    In American football, a dimeback is a cornerback who serves as the sixth defensive back (fourth cornerback) on defense. The third cornerback on defense is known as a nickelback. The dimeback position is essentially relegated to backup cornerbacks who do not play starting cornerback positions. Dimebacks are usually fast players because they must be able to keep up on passing plays with 3+ wide receivers.

    Dimebacks are brought into the game when the defense uses a "Dime" formation, which utilizes six defensive backs rather than four or five. Usually, a dimeback replaces a linebacker in order to gain better pass defense.

    NIckleback
    In American football, a nickelback is a cornerback who serves as the fifth defensive back on defense. The nickelback is the third cornerback on the depth chart, and does not regularly see much play-time. The nickleback will be called into to the game in order to have three cornerbacks on the field, as opposed to two.
     
  14. LV Bolt Fan

    LV Bolt Fan Well-Known Member

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    Unless your in Oakland.:icon_rofl:
     
  15. Shamrock

    Shamrock New Member

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    No .... that's quite enough for now. I don't want your brain to explode.

    :yes:

    :lol:
     
  16. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Safety

    Safety (S) is an American football position on defense. They are defensive backs, who line up from five to ten yards behind the line of scrimmage. There are two variations of the position in a typical formation, the free safety (FS) and the strong safety (SS). Their duties depend on the defensive scheme. Safeties are the last lines of defense, and are thus responsible for preventing opposing players from making big plays. As professional and college football has become more focused on the passing game, safeties have become more involved in covering receivers.

    Strong safety
    The strong safety tends to be a bit larger and stronger than the free safety. He is tasked to handle the "strong side" of the offense, the side where the tight end lines up. The strong safety tends to play closer to the line and assist in stopping the run. He may also be responsible for covering a player, such as a running back or fullback or h-back, who goes in motion in the backfield and then out for a pass. Strong safeties occasionally blitz as well. When this happens, the pressure is very severe since a blitz by a defensive back is not usually anticipated.


    Free safety
    The free safety tends to be smaller and faster than the strong safety. His job tends to be to stay back a bit, watch the play unfold, and follow the ball. On pass plays, the free safety is supposed to close near the receiver by the time the ball gets to him. Offenses tend to call play action passes specifically to draw the free safety closer to the line to stop a long run. If the offense puts a receiver in the slot, then the free safety may be called upon to cover that receiver.


    Cover-2
    Sometimes instead of the safeties dividing up their jobs in terms of run support and pass support, the safeties will divide up the field into a left half and a right half, and each will be responsible for anything that comes into his half of the field. This type of division of responsibility is becoming more and more common,[2] and is called a cover 2 defense. The cover-2 was first used by the Steelers in the 1970's, but was made famous by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the late 90's. Led by head coach Tony Dungy and defensive coordinator Monte Kiffen, the Bucs built a dominating defense, with strong safety John Lynch at the forefront. In many football circles, the cover-2 is even referred to as the "Tampa 2". Since then, the popularity of the cover-2 has soared. Both of the teams in Super Bowl XLI, the Colts and the Bears, ran a primarily cover-two defense.
     
  17. Concudan

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    Cornerback

    A cornerback (CB) (also referred to as a corner) is a position in American and Canadian football, more broadly classified as a defensive back. Widely accepted as being the most difficult of all the positions, the modern cornerback is ideally very fast, agile, and has good football instincts. Like any defensive player, he must be able to react faster than his opponent, since he does not have the luxury of knowing where a play is going to go. Essential skills for a cornerback include jamming, backpedaling, jumping, shadowing his man, anticipating a pass route, reading the quarterback, and tackling.

    Most modern NFL defensive formations use four defensive backs (two safeties and two corners); CFL defenses generally use five defensive backs (one safety, two defensive halfbacks, and two corners). A corner's responsibilities vary depending on the type of coverage called. Coverage is simply how the defense will be protecting against the pass. A corner will be given one of two ways to defend the pass (with variations that result in more or less the same responsibilities): zone and man-to-man.


    Zone coverage
    In zone coverage, the cornerback is responsible for a particular area of the field. A zone may consist of any number of areas such as the "deep third", (the deepest one-third of the field in a "3 deep zone"). In a "3 deep zone" (aka "cover 1"), each cornerback is responsible for covering his prospective "deep third" (the outside third, hence the term corner) of the field while a safety ( usually the free safety ) covers the "middle third". Another type of zone coverage is called "cover 2" or a "2 deep zone".

    Although usually the corners' duties reflect one another in your most basic garden variety 2 deep coverages, many variations of the 2 deep zone exists. For example, one variation allocates the weak-side cornerback (eg. the "left cornerback") to cover half the field in order to allow the strong safety to do other things or simply to provide the offense with different looks. The safety's job is also to cover half the field, the other half of course. The strong side cornerback (eg. the "right cornerback") may be in a variety of different alignments which may include "loose man", "man-under", or "man-up". Although these are one-on-one coverages, more often than not his responsibility is usually limited to an initial funneling and subsequent drop back into a zone called the "void". This is a pie shaped slice of field included with your most basic 2 deep zone coverage. One interesting aspect sometimes encountered in cover 2 is that it is possible for one corner to be in a zone coverage where he funnels and drops into the void, while the other corner is in man coverage. However, your basic garden variety 2 deep zone usually employs the two safetys to share half the field responsibilities, with the two corners funneling.


    Single or man coverage
    In man coverage, the cornerback is solely responsible for the receiver across from him, usually the offensive player split farthest out. In man coverage, rarely is the corner tasked with keeping his assigned wide receiver "inside" of him. For example, for man-coverage in the "red zone" (an area between the goal-line and the twenty-yard line) it's better to prevent the receiver from going inside (towards the middle of the field such as in a crossing route or a quick-post) because these routes are difficult to stop, especially when there's a lot of traffic on the inside. Although illegal, defenders are easily "picked" by opposing receivers and sometimes by their own teammates. To avoid this, it is favorable for cornerbacks to line up close to the line discrimmage if the ball is inside the 5 yard line, and force the receiver toward the sideline (outside) without violating the 5 yard no touch rule.
     
  18. Concudan

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    Linebacker

    A linebacker (LB) is a position in American and Canadian football invented by football coach Fielding Yost of the University of Michigan. Linebackers are members of the defensive team, and line up approximately five to seven yards behind the line of scrimmage, behind the defensive linemen. Linebackers generally align themselves before the ball is snapped by standing upright in a "two point stance" (as opposed to the defensive linemen, who put one or two hands on the ground for a "three point stance" or "four point stance" before the ball is snapped). The linebacker is often the most feared player on the defensive side of the ball and is considered the ideal blend of size, strength, ferocity, speed and overall athleticism.
     
  19. Concudan

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    Defensive Tackle

    Defensive tackle (DT) is a position on the field in American and Canadian football.

    Defensive Tackles are typically the largest and strongest of the defensive players. The defensive tackle typically lines up opposite one of the offensive guards. Depending on a team's individual defensive scheme, a defensive tackle may be called upon to fill several different roles. These roles may include merely holding the point of attack by refusing to be moved, which also prevents offensive lineman from being able to get to the linebackers and successfully block them on running plays or penetrating a certain gap between offensive linemen to break up a play in the opponent's backfield. The former is often referred to as "two gap" play, the latter as "one gap" play. Historically, one gap play was more frequently the role common for a defensive tackle to use as two gap play requires a defensive tackle to be rather large (most DTs who are good at two gap play are over 330 pounds) a development that has only occurred in the last 5-10 years of football. The concept of using one or both defensive tackles in "two gap" play was popularized on the 2000 Baltimore Ravens, who used Sam Adams and Tony Siragusa in this role, allowing their linebackers (namely Ray Lewis) to attack the ball carrier without being blocked by an offensive player. If a defensive tackle reads a pass play, his primary responsibility is to pursue the quarterback, or simply knock the pass down at the line if it's within arm's reach. Other responsibilities of the defensive tackle may be to pursue the screen pass or drop into coverage in a zone blitz scheme.

    In the 3-4 defensive scheme the sole defensive tackle is referred to as the nose tackle. This scheme most often asks the defensive tackles to play a two gap role as opposed to penetrating the offensive line themselves, so that other players in the defensive front can attack ballcarriers and rush the quarterback.

    Run Stopping
    Defensive tackles must be able to contain rushes and to fill holes in the defensive line. Good defensive tackles will force the runner to run to the outside of the line, allowing the linebackers and the secondary to tackle the runner, often for a loss of yardage.


    Pass Rushing
    On passing plays, the defensive tackles will in most cases rush at the guards and center to attempt to contain and/or sack the quarterback. Because the quarterback will usually drop back to avoid the rush, pressure down the middle of the line will prevent the quarterback from stepping into the "pocket" (a safe area for the quarterback to throw created by the offensive line), leaving the quarterback more vulnerable to the defensive ends, and in many cases, forcing a bad throw.

    Also, defensive tackles will often jump up when a quarterback throws in an attempt to deflect the pass, sometimes leading to an interception.


    Coverage
    In rare cases, a defensive tackle will drop back from the line of scrimmage in order to cover passes. This is usually accompanied by a blitz by a linebacker where the defensive tackle would rush, confusing the offensive line.


    Gaps
    There are a lot of different ways to line up your tackles, and they have different names depending on how you line them up. On the offensive line, there are gaps between the linemen. The first important thing for a tackle is how many gaps he has to cover. Sometimes the defensive scheme says he is responsible for only one gap - it's his job to make sure the running back can't come through his gap, and the other gaps will be someone else's responsibility. In this case we say the tackle is playing in a one gap defense. The tackle will line up right in the gap, not directly facing any offensive lineman.

    In other schemes, the tackle will be responsible for two gaps. In this case the tackle will line up directly facing an offensive lineman, and his job will be to push that lineman backwards and make sure the running back doesn't run past on either side of his lineman.

    If you want to play a two gap scheme, you need larger stronger defensive tackles who can control an offensive lineman or even two offensive lineman. If you want to play a one gap scheme you can use slightly smaller defensive tackles who are faster and more athletic and can penetrate into the offensive backfield more often. In a two gap scheme, the tackles are supposed to control the linemen, thus making sure that no one is blocking the linebackers behind them and the linebackers are then free to make the play and tackle the runner. So in a two gap scheme, you don't expect the defensive tackles to have a large number of sacks or tackles. They are doing their job if the linebackers have a lot of sacks and tackles, or if the team has good statistics against up the middle rushes.

    In a one gap scheme, the defensive tackle is supposed to tackle the running back if he comes in the tackle's gap. On a passing play, the tackle is supposed to get into the quarterback's area and disrupt the play, possibly tackling the quarterback for a sack. So you expect tackles in a one gap scheme to tackle the runner and sack the quarterback more often.

    If you want to be especially good at rushing the passer you'll find four relatively athletic, perhaps somewhat smaller defensive linemen and line them up in a 1 gap scheme. Now you will have at least three gaps unprotected, so it's important in this scheme that you have three very solid linebackers who can cover these gaps. If you want to be particularly good at stopping the run, then you will get four heavier and perhaps slightly slower defensive linemen, and play them in a two gap scheme. Now the offensive linemen will be all tied up with your linemen, clogging up all the interior running lanes and leaving your three linebackers free to roam for the running back.


    Plays by Tackles
    Just as the offensive linemen have choreographed routines to block the defense, the defensive linemen have choreographed routines to try to get into the offensive backfield. Two of the most popular are called a stunt and a zone blitz. In a stunt, one lineman will block an offensive lineman diagonally, say to his left. Then a second defensive lineman who started on the first lineman's left will take a half step backwards, run quickly around behind the first lineman, and then try to run into the backfield in the hole the first lineman created in his right. Another favorite dance is called a "zone blitz." In this scheme, one or two linebackers will rush on the same side of the center, perhaps the weak side away from the tight end. So you have a center, a guard, and a tackle trying to stop a defensive tackle, a defensive end, and two linebackers. This is almost impossible. However, when you do this you leave a big hole in your defense where the two linebackers ran away to get into the backfield. What the defense can do about this is to have the defensive tackle and perhaps defensive end drop back from the line and try to defend those "zones" that the linebackers just vacated. Of course defensive linemen are not the greatest guys in the world at pass defense, but the idea is that they only need to defend these areas for about two seconds, then the blitz should be hitting the quarterback.


    Types of Tackles
    The linemen on the offensive line line up a few feet away from each other. This leaves gaps between the linemen. These gaps are both lettered and numbered, as shown below. The gap between the guard and tackle is called the B gap. If you are a defensive tackle lined up in the B gap, but shifted over a bit towards the guard, you're called a 3-technique. If you were lined up in the same gap but shifted over a couple feet to line up on the tackle's shoulder, you would be a 4-technique. If you line up directly facing the center, you're called a nose tackle or a 0-technique.

    Nose tackles are two-gap players and are typically very big and very strong men. These guys have the responsibility of clogging up the entire center of the field, of keeping the center and at least one guard busy, and thereby protecting their middle linebacker. The nose tackle will also be responsible in passing plays to push the center back towards the quarterback so that the quarterback cannot step up in the pocket and evade the rush of the defensive ends. A good nose tackle can be hit simultaneously by 650 pounds of center and guard and will not budge as much as one inch.

    Occasionally, a defensive scheme will ask both defensive tackles to essentially play as nose tackles, one trying to occupy both the center and a guard, and the other trying to occupy the opposite guard and the corresponding tackle. If successful, this leaves a tight end trying to block a defensive end on one side, and the other tackle left to block the other defensive end, leaving the responsibility to blocking the three linebackers, be it if they are blitzing a pass or preventing a run, to the running backs. This strategy requires two nose tackles who are very good at two-gap play, and two athletic ends who can beat a blocker to the outside for pass rush, but can be very effective if the talent is there. This style was the preferred defensive scheme of the 2000 Baltimore Ravens, a top-5 defensive team of all time and the best defense at stopping the run in the modern era.

    A 3-technique tackle lines up between the offensive guard and tackle. A 3-technique tackle is supposed to run through his gap immediately. He is a 1-gap player. His job is not to block or get tied up in a block, but rather to be athletic and get himself into the offensive backfield and disrupt their plans. Because of this a 3-technique tackle is a lighter more athletic guy than a nose tackle.
     
  20. Concudan

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    Defensive End

    Defensive end (DE) is the name of a defensive position in the sport of American and Canadian football.

    This position has designated the players at each end of the defensive line, but changes in formations have substantially changed how the position is played over the years.


    History
    Early formations, with six- and seven-man lines, used the end as a containment player, whose job was first to prevent an "end run" around his position, then secondarily to force plays inside.

    When most teams adopted a five-man line, two different styles of end play developed: "crashing" ends, who rushed into the backfield to disrupt plays, and "stand-up" or "waiting" ends, who played the more traditional containment style. Some teams would use both styles of end play, depending on game situations.

    Traditionally, defensive ends are in a three-point stance, with their free hand cocked back ready to "punch" the offensive lineman. Some defensive ends play the position due to their size; they close down their gap so the running back has no hole to run through. Other ends play the position due to their speed and agility; they are used to rush the quarterback. These ends can time the snap of the ball in order to get a jump on the rush.

    Most of the time it is the job of the defensive end to keep outside contain, which means that no one should get to their outside; they must keep everything to the inside. The defensive ends are usually fast for players of their size, often the fastest and smallest players on the defensive line. They must be able to shed blockers to get to the ball. Defensive ends are also often used to cover the outside area of the line of scrimmage, to tackle ball carriers running to the far right or left side, and to defend against screen passes. Defensive ends are usually the only players on the line who are ever used to cover offensive players running receiving routes, albeit ones that are very close to the line of scrimmage.
     
  21. Concudan

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    Nose Tackle

    4-3
    In a traditional 4-3 defensive set, known as a two-gap defensive set, the nose tackle (NT) is one of two defensive tackles, usually on the weak side of the offensive line. His job is to take up the center and weak-side or pulling guard so that the smaller 'rush' end has a 1-on-1 matchup with the offense's blindside tackle. The second defensive tackle sometimes referred to as an 'under tackle', takes up the strongside guard and the strongside end takes up the strongside offensive tackle. A 1-gap scheme relies on an athletic defensive line rather than a large one and does not include a nose tackle. More modern, cover-2 schemes include either four smaller, athletic linemen, like Tony Dungy's scheme, developed in Tampa Bay; or two small, athletic ends and two nose tackles, like the scheme used by the Baltimore Ravens during their 2000 championship season.


    3-4
    In a 3-4 defensive scheme, the nose tackle is the sole defensive tackle, lining up directly opposite the center in the "0" position. Like the traditional 4-3, the nose tackle must occupy the center and one guard, however in the 3-4 it is typically the strongside guard. One defensive end then matches up with both the strongside tackle and tight end, while the other occupies the weakside guard and tackle. This leaves the outside linebackers free to pass-rush, creating the 3-4 scheme's distinctive pressure on the passing game.
     
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    Gunner

    In American football, a gunner (also often referred to as a "shooter") is a player on kickoffs and punts who specializes in running down the sideline very quickly in an attempt to tackle the kick returner or the punt returner. Gunners must have several techniques in order to break away or "shed" blockers, and have good agility in order to change their running direction quickly. Gunners on the punt team also must be able to block or catch.

    Nearly all gunners play Safety, Cornerback, or Wide Receiver when not on special teams.

    Gunner may also refer to the one or two players assigned to block the gunner of the punting team.

    Arguably the greatest gunner of all time was Steve Tasker, who is considered the greatest special teams player in the history of professional football.


    Role
    On punts there will be two players on the punting team lined up wide, like wide receivers. These are called gunners. They are the only players on the kicking team allowed to start running down field as soon as the ball is snapped. Everyone else on the kicking team must wait until the ball is kicked. The gunner's job is to try to get down the field as fast as the kicked ball and tackle whoever catches it. In the best case, they get there just before the ball and make the other team afraid to try to catch it. When a team lines up to punt, the other team lines up in a defense that is designed to also receive a punt. There will be one player lined up about 40 yards back; he is the receiver, the player designated to catch the punt. There will also be a few players lined up on the gunners. If the defense lines up two defenders on each gunner, then they are hoping to slow the gunners down, catch the punt, and try to run the punt back for a long gain or even a touchdown. If there is only one defender lined up on each gunner, then the receiving team has extra players rushing the punter and they hope to block the punt.
     
  23. Concudan

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    Kick Returner

    In American and Canadian football, a kick returner (KR) is the player on special teams who is primarily responsible to catch kickoffs and attempts to return them in the opposite direction. If the ball is kicked into his own endzone, he must assess the situation on the field while the ball is in the air and determine if it would be beneficial to his team for a return. If he decides that it is not, he can make a touchback by kneeling down in the end zone after catching the ball, which gives his team the ball at their own 20-yard line to start the drive.

    He is usually one of the faster players on the team, often a backup wide receiver, defensive back, or running back.

    A kick returner might also double as a punt returner as well.

    One of the greatest kick returners in history is Devin Hester, currently with the Chicago Bears. He set an NFL record for most returns in a single season. He is the first player in history to take back the opening kickoff of the Super Bowl for a touchdown. He set another NFL record with two kick returns for touchdowns against the St. Louis Rams in 2006.
     
  24. Concudan

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    Punt Returner

    Punt returner (PR) is a position on special teams in American football.


    Description
    The role of a punt returner is to catch the ball after it is punted and to give his team good field position (or a touchdown if possible) by returning it. Before catching the punted ball, the returner must assess the situation on the field while the ball is still in the air. He must determine if it is actually beneficial for his team to attempt a return. If it appears that the players from the punting team will be too close to the returner by the time he catches the ball, or it appears the ball will go into his own end zone, the punt returner can elect not to return the ball by choosing one of two options:

    Call for a fair catch by waving one arm in the air before catching the punt. This means that the play will end once the catch is made; the punt returner's team will get the ball at the spot of the catch and no return attempt can be made. The fair catch minimizes the chances of a fumble or injury because it ensures that the returner is fully protected from the opposing team, whose players may not touch the returner or attempt to interfere with the catch in any way after the fair catch signal is given.
    Avoid the ball and let it hit the ground. Under this option the ball will go into the returning team's end zone for a touchback, go out of bounds and be spotted at that point, or come to final rest in the field of play and be downed by a player on the punting team. This is safest option, as it completely eliminates the chance of a fumble and ensures that the returner's team will get possession of the ball. However, it also provides an opportunity for the punting team to pin the returner's team deep in their own territory by downing the ball or sending it out of bounds near the returner's end zone.
    The position demands footspeed, quick reflexes, and good hands. Punt returners sometimes also return kickoffs and usually play other positions, especially wide receiver, defensive back and running back, although sometimes as backups. An analogous position exists in Canadian football, though differences in rules affect play considerably. See Comparison of Canadian and American football for a complete discussion of the punt returner's role in the Canadian game.
     
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    Holder

    In American football the holder is the player who receives the snap during field goal and extra point attempts. The holder is usually positioned between seven and eight yards behind the line of scrimmage. The holder kneels down and places the hand furthest from the line of scrimmage on the ground with the other hand held out waiting for the ball to be snapped to him. After receiving the ball the holder places it on the ground, as quickly as possible, so that one end is touching the ground and the other end is supported by one finger. The holder also rotates the ball so that the laces are facing towards the goal posts.

    The holder is usually a player who plays another position, but doubles as a holder. Often, the holder will be a punter or a quarterback (as the position calls for good hands and concentration, the quarterback may naturally be the best holder on the team).

    During a "fake field goal" attempt the holder may pick the ball up and either throw a forward pass or run with the ball.

    There can also be a holder during kickoffs and free kicks, but this is reserved for when the ball tee cannot keep the ball up by itself, usually due to wind.

    The holder, a position usually unnoticed in modern football, was an integral part of the movie Ace Ventura: Pet Detective. In the film, fictional placekicker Ray Finkle seeks revenge after Miami Dolphins holder (and quarterback) Dan Marino neglects to hold the ball “laces out,” causing Finkle to miss a potential game-winning kick in the Super Bowl.
     
  26. Concudan

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    Long Snapper

    In American football, the term long snapper refers to a player who is a specialized center during punts, field goals, and extra point attempts. His job is to snap the ball as quickly and accurately as possible. During field goals and point after tries, the snap is received by the holder. During punt plays the snap is delivered to the punter. A good, consistent long snapper is hard to find, and many marginally talented players have found a niche exclusively as long snappers.

    A "bad snap" is a snap which causes the delay of a kick or the failure of a play. It is usually because of an inaccurate snap.

    The long snapper still performs the normal tasks of a center and also runs downfield after the ball has been punted to help defend the punt return.

    On punts, most NFL long snappers get the ball to the punter in .70 seconds and immediately attempt to make the tackle downfield.

    Long Snappers usually aren't known throughout the NFL, and usually are never drafted (because they play other positions). Many long snappers in college are back up tight ends.
     
  27. Concudan

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    Punter

    A punter (P) in American or Canadian football is a special teams player who receives the snapped ball directly from the line of scrimmage and then punts (kicks) the football to the opposing team so as to limit any field position advantage. The opposing team may receive the ball by stopping the offense on a fourth (or third in Canadian football) down. Punters must be skilled in angling the football and/or kicking it as high as possible (called ‘hangtime’) to maximize his teammates’ ability to eliminate a punt returner's forward progress. Punters are rarely well known, or recognized by fans, but play a major role in winning the field position battle. Today, punters have increasingly began to pull double duty as the holder on field goal attempts and also being used on kickoffs as well. One of the main reasons why punters are starting to take over the holder position is that the backup quarterback is usually busy with the rest of the offense and has little time to devote to holding. The deep snapper for field goals is usually the punt snapper as well (see long snapper), so the punter already has developed a chemistry with the snapper. Punters are also kickers and naturally understand kicking mechanics better, such as knowing how far back to lean the ball, and being a better judge on whether or not to abort a field goal attempt. Punters are also usually on their own for the most part during team practices, allowing them the time to work with the kicker. Many punters also double duty as kickoff specialists as most punters have been at one point field goal kickers as well and some, such as Craig Hentrich, have filled in as worthy backup field goal kickers.

    Although most punters have relatively short playing careers some can have exceptionally long careers, compared to other NFL position players. One reason for this is their limited time on the field and heavy protection by penalties against defensive players for late hits makes them far less likely to be injured then other positions. Sean Landeta, for instance, played 19 NFL seasons and 3 USFL seasons for 8 different teams, and Darren Bennett played 11 NFL seasons despite not starting his NFL career until age 30 (he had previously been a professional in Australian rules football).

    Ray Guy (Oakland Raiders) is the first pure punter to be picked in the first round of the NFL Draft. Russell Erxleben was selected as the 11th pick in the first round of the 1979 draft by the New Orleans Saints as a punter but also performed kicking duties as well. Guy is credited with raising the status of punters in the NFL because he proved to be a major ingredient in the Raiders success during the 1970s by preventing opponents from gaining field position advantage.

    Statistically, the greatest punter in the history of professional football is Bob Cameron of the Winnipeg Blue Bombers (CFL) who, in a 23 year career, punted for 134,301 yards.
     
  28. Concudan

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    Place Kicker

    Placekicker, or simply kicker (K), is the title of the player in American and Canadian football who is responsible for the kicking duties of field goals, extra points, and, in many cases, kickoffs.

    Specialized role of Kicker (vs punter)
    The kicker initially was not a specialized role. Until the 1960s, the kicker was almost always doubled at another position on the roster. As the era of "two-way" players gave way to increased specialization, teams would employ a specialist at punter and kicker. Because the skills are different enough, and to reduce the risk of injury, on the professional level most teams employ separate players to handle the jobs. The placekicker usually will only punt when the punter is injured. (One player often handles both jobs in the Canadian Football League, which has smaller active rosters than in the NFL.) Occasionally a professional team will even have a kicker who handles only the kickoffs and serves as a backup to the kicker who handles field goals and extra points, typically to further protect a premier kicker from injury or if their premier kicker, while accurate, does not have the leg strength to kick the long kicks required for kickoffs.

    Amateur teams (e.g., college, high school) often do not differentiate between placekickers and punters, have different players assume different placekicking duties (for example, one person handles kicking off, another kicks long field goals, and another kicks from shorter distances), or have regular position players handle kicking duties. The last option is quite common on high school teams, when the best athletes are often the best kickers. Before the modern era of pro football, this was also the case for professional teams, particularly when most place kicks were still made in the "straight on" style outlined below.

    Salary, stature
    Placekickers and punters are frequently the lowest-paid starters on professional teams, although proven placekickers sometimes earn over a million dollars per year in salary.

    In addition, kickers are at times ostracized by other players due to the perceived non-physical and limited nature of their duties. The presence of foreign born-and-raised players in the highest levels of gridiron football has largely been limited to placekickers - occasionally even coming from outside the traditional American high school and/or college football systems - thereby increasing the perception of the placekicker as an outsider.

    Kicking style
    Placekickers today are almost all "soccer-style" kickers, approaching the ball from several steps to the left or right of it and several steps behind and striking the ball with the instep of the foot. Before this method of kicking was popularized in the 1960s by Charlie and Pete Gogolak, every place kicker was a "straight on" kicker, a style that requires the use of a special shoe that is extremely rigid and has a flattened toe. [1] In the straight on style, the kicker approaches the ball from directly behind the rather than from the side and strikes the ball with the toe.

    Shoes
    Placekickers in the modern game usually wear specialized shoes, but in rare circumstances some prefer to kick barefoot. Tony Franklin was one such kicker, who played in Super Bowls for the Philadelphia Eagles and New England Patriots. More recently, Englishman Rob Hart kicked barefoot during his 7-year NFL Europe career. John Baker also used the style in the 1990s in the Canadian Football League.
     
  29. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    The Gallup Poll has shown football to be America's favorite sport every year since 1972, when football first overtook baseball in popularity. The percentage of Americans who say football is their favorite sport to watch (43%) is higher now than at any other time. Football's American TV viewership ratings far surpass those of other sports.[4] The day of the National Football League championship, the Super Bowl, is one of the biggest occasions for social gatherings in the U.S. and is sometimes referred to as an unofficial national holiday.
     
  30. Retired Catholic

    Retired Catholic BoltTalker

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    Next up, Australian rules football. Get cracking.


    :icon_rofl:
     

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