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Charger Coaches; Chronology

Discussion in 'Chargers Fan Forum' started by Concudan, May 11, 2007.

  1. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Sid Gilman;

    1960-69, '71
    87-57-6, .600

    One of football’s great innovators, Sid Gillman served as head coach of the National Football League’s (NFL) Los Angeles Rams from 1955 to 1959 and the American Football League AFL/ NFL Los Angeles/San Diego Chargers from 1960 to 1971.

    Before he made his name as a professional coach, Gillman, an All-America end for Ohio State University in 1932 and 1933, served as either coach or head coach for 21 years in college football at Ohio State, Dennison, Ohio; Miami of Ohio; West Point Military Academy; and Cincinnati. His collegiate teams won 79, lost 18, and tied 2.

    As head coach of the NFL’s Rams, Gillman won one Division title. With the AFL Chargers, he captured five Division crowns and the 1963 AFL Championship. Gillman was the first head coach to win Divisional titles in both the NFL and AFL. Poor health forced his premature retirement in 1971.

    The venerable Gillman, who was also the Chargers’ general manager, is credited with the idea for the Super Bowl—the AFL-NFL World Championship Game. He developed the use of game and practice films as an integral aspect of coaching and was the first to
    put names of players on the backs of their jerseys. On the field, Gillman was a strong advocate and brilliant strategist of the wide-open forward pass offense and is credited with being one of
    the developers of the “two-platoon system.”

    Some of Gillman’s coaching protégés are Al Davis, Chuck Noll, Bum
    Phillips, Dan Henning, Ara Parseghian, and Paul Dietzel. Many credit the success of the “upstart” AFL to Gillman’s skillful organizational techniques.

    With improved health, Sid joined the Houston Oilers in 1973 as their general manager. Halfway through the season, he fired the head coach, took over the job, and led the Oilers on and off the field through 1974—after which he was fired. Nevertheless, he was named NFL Coach of the Year in 1974.

    Health, once again, forced Gillman into retirement, until he resurfaced in 1977 as the Chicago Bears’ offensive coordinator. That year, the Bears made the League playoffs for the first time in
    14 seasons. Sid moved to the Philadelphia Eagles in 1979, but following heart by-pass surgery, his duties were narrowed to quarterback development.

    Sid Gillman was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1983 and to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1989.
     
  2. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Sidney Gillman. . .Innovative coach, dynamic administrator. . . Recognized as leading authority on passing theories, tactics . . .18-year pro record: 123-104-7. . .First to win divisional titles in both NFL, AFL. . . Won 1963 league, five division crowns in AFL's first six years. . .Major factor in developing AFL's image, impetus, respect. . .AFC Coach of the Year, 1974 . . .Played in first College All-Star game, 1934. . .Born October 26, 1911, in Minneapolis, Minnesota. . .Died January 3, 2003, at age of 91.

    After Bronko Nagurski flattened him in the first College All-Star game in 1934, Sid Gillman decided he might have a better future in coaching. It was a sound career decision. He began his coaching career, however, in an era that taught that running the ball was the surest way to victory.

    It was a philosophy with which he disagreed. “The big play comes with the pass,” he would tell anyone who would take time to listen. “God bless those runners because they get you the first down, give you ball control and keep your defense off the field. But if you want to ring the cash register, you have to pass.”


    Sid went on to become the foremost authority on forward passing offense. He was the first coach to produce divisional champions in both the National and American Football Leagues. Gillman’s first pro coaching job came in 1955 when he became the Los Angeles Rams head coach. In his first year he led the team to a division crown.

    Five years later, when the AFL was founded, Gillman became the head coach and general manager of the Chargers, who played in Los Angeles in 1960 before settling in San Diego the next year. For the full decade of the AFL (1960-1969), Sid was the lifeblood of the Chargers and a major catalyst to an entire league in its life-and-death struggle. His high-scoring Chargers won divisional crowns five of the league’s first six seasons and the AFL title in 1963.

    Sid's coaching was important but his organizational genius may have had even more lasting impact. As one observer noted, "Sid gave the Chargers image, impetus and respect and, in so doing, forced an entire league to adopt his methods just to remain competitive."

    http://www.profootballhof.com/hof/member.jsp?player_id=76
     
  3. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Charlie Waller
    1969-70

    9-7-3, .553

    Charlie was coach of the San Diego Chargers foe less than two full seasons. Before being replaced by Sid Gilman, the head coach he replaced.
     
  4. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    1969: Playing although early schedule the Chargers get off to a slow start as their playoff hopes fade during a 4-6 start. However, in a reversal of previous season they finish the season on a solid note winning their last 4 games to finish with an 8-6 record. Following the season Coach Sid Gillman is forced to step down due to health concerns he would remain on as GM.

    1970: Now led by Coach Charlie Waller the Chargers struggle out of the gate going winless through their first 4 games. The Chargers would bounce back with a 5 game unbeaten streak. However, they would fade down the stretch winning just once to finish with a disappointing 5-6-3 record. Following the season Waller is demoted to Offensive Coach as Sid Gillman returns to his post after stepping down as GM.
     
  5. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Harland Svare
    1971-73

    7-17-2, .307

    (born November 15, 1930) is a former American Football linebacker who played for eight seasons with the Los Angeles Rams and the New York Giants from 1953 to 1960 in the National Football League. He was the Rams head coach from midway the 1962 season through 1965, and the San Diego Chargers head coach from 1971 through 1973.
     
  6. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Ron Waller
    1973

    1-5, .166


    1973: The Chargers acquire legendary QB Johnny Unitas to replace John Hadl, and to tutor rookie Dan Fouts. However, there is no magic left in the legendary quarterback's arm as he completes just 34 passes for 471 yards. Fouts would take over, but would struggle with turnovers as the Chargers got off to a 1-6-1 start leading Harland Svare to step down as coach. His replacement Ron Waller would no do much better winning just 1 of 6 as the Chargers finished with a terrible 2-11-1 record.
     
  7. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Tommy Prothro
    1974-78

    21-39-0, .350

    This is the invisible coach. No news about him, if you find anything please post it.
     
  8. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Don Coryell
    1978-86

    72-60, .545

    Don Coryell (born October 17, 1924) is a former American football coach, who coached in the NFL first with the St. Louis Cardinals from 1973-1977 and then the San Diego Chargers from 1978-1986. He is well-known for his innovations to football's passing offense. Coryell's offense today is commonly known as "Air Coryell". However, the Charger offense lacked the ability to control the clock, resulting in their defense spending too much time on the field. As a result, they fell short of getting to the Super Bowl. He was inducted into the San Diego Chargers Hall of Fame in 1986. Coryell is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame.

    Don Coryell played defensive back for the University of Washington from 1949-1951. Coryell coached 12 seasons with the San Diego State Aztecs, using the philosophy of recruiting only junior college players. There, he compiled a record of 104 wins, 18 losses and 2 ties including undefeated season in 1966, 1968 and 1969. He was an assistant coach for the USC Trojans in 1960.

    Coryell is the first coach ever to win more than 100 games at both the collegiate and professional level. He won two consecutive division titles (1974, 1975) with the Cardinals and three straight division titles (1979, 1980, 1981) with the Chargers, reaching the playoffs four times with the latter team. With Dan Fouts as quarterback, San Diego's "Air Coryell" was among the greatest passing offenses in NFL history.

    At San Diego State, Coryell helped develop a number of quarterbacks for the NFL, including Don Horn, Bob Klatt, Jesse Frietas, Dennis Shaw and Brian Sipe, and also coached two players who later became actors: Fred Dryer and Carl Weathers. Coryell's development of future coaches included John Madden, Joe Gibbs, Jim Hanifan, Rod Dowhower, and Ernie Zampese.
     
  9. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Al Saunders
    1986-88

    17-22-0, .436

    Al Saunders (born February 1, 1947 in London, England) is an American football coach. He is the Associate Head Coach - Offense, a top assistant coach, for the Washington Redskins.

    Al Saunders played Defensive Back at San Jose State University (SJSU) from 1966-1968 where he was a three-year starter, team captain and Academic All-American. Saunders also played Wide Receiver for the San Jose State Spartans.

    In the 1970s, Al Saunders joined the coaching staff at USC and San Diego State University (SDSU), whose SDSU Aztecs were then under the control of Head Coach Don Coryell. Saunders would go with Coryell to NFL when Coryell became the Head Coach of the San Diego Chargers.

    From 1983-1986, Saunders was the wide receivers coach for the Chargers. He was tapped as the Charger's Interim Head Coach when Coryell resigned during the middle of the 1986 season. Saunders would eventually replace Coryell as the Head Coach from 1986-1988.

    From 1989-1998, Saunders was with the Kansas City Chiefs, where he served as the Assistant Head Coach and Wide Receivers Coach under Marty Schottenheimer.

    Saunders would then join the St. Louis Rams coaching staff. From 1999-2000 he served as the Wide Receivers Coach under Dick Vermeil and later as Assistant Head Coach under Mike Martz. During this period, the Rams won Super Bowl XXXIV in 2000.

    Saunders would rejoin the Kansas City Chiefs in 2001 as the Offensive Coordinator when Vermeil came out of retirement. In his second stint with the Chiefs, Saunders built the NFL's top offense, which was ranked #1 in the NFL from 2002-2005.

    On January 19, 2006, he joined the coaching staff of the Washington Redskins as the Associate Head Coach - Offense, reuniting him with fellow "Air Coryell" alumn, Joe Gibbs. His 3-year, $6 million contract makes him the second highest paid assistant coach in the NFL behind Gregg Williams. Players such as recent additions Antwaan Randle El and Brandon Lloyd have claimed that the signing of Saunders to the Washington Coaching Staff was a major pull factor in their decision to sign with the Redskins. In this role, he will serve the team like he did in Kansas City, as the primary playcaller and offensive coordinator.

    Saunders offensive playbook reportedly has approximately 700 pages of various plays. When the Redskins struggled offensively in the 2006 pre-season and during the first two regular season games, the lengthy playbook became the subject of criticism -both humorous and serious- by Washington sports media. However, desiring not to provide scouting information to opponents, the Redskins only used a small number of plays (estimated by Saunders at around 2% of his playbook) during the pre-season. Beginning with the third game of the regular season, Washington's offensive production increased but later fell.

    Many believe that the pairing of Al Saunders offense and the veteran quarterback Mark Brunell was a bad fit. The Al Saunders offense, an Air Coryell offense, requires a quarterback with a very accurate sense of timing and trust with the receiver which could not be replicated in Washington during Brunell's 2006 season.

    Al Saunders was born in London, England. He became a naturalized citizen in 1960 and is only one of four foreign-born coaches in the NFL.
     
  10. Thumper

    Thumper WHS

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    It's all right here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tommy_Prothro

    Google is your friend. :lol:

    The San Diego Chargers hired Prothro as their new head coach on January 8, 1974, and also put him in charge of rebuilding the once-proud franchise that had become mired in a drug scandal. During his first two years, the team continued to struggle, bottoming out with a 2-12 mark in 1975, but that same year, Prothro drafted a number of players who would have a major impact on the franchise, including defensive linemen Gary "Big Hands" Johnson, Louie Kelcher and Fred Dean.

    During each of the next two years, the Chargers showed considerable improvement, and seemed ready to make their move during the 1978 NFL season. However, a 1-3 start, marked by a loss to the Raiders in what became known as the Holy Roller game of September 10, caused Prothro to abruptly resign as head coach in favor of Don Coryell.
     
  11. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Dan Henning
    1989-91

    16-32-0, .333

    Dan Henning (born June 21, 1942 in The Bronx, New York) was an American college and professional football player. A quarterback, he played collegiately at William and Mary, and professionally (in 1966) for the American Football League's San Diego Chargers. He is the former Head Coach of the Atlanta Falcons (1983-1986) and the San Diego Chargers (1989-1991) of the NFL. He was the head coach of the Boston College Eagles (1994-96). He then returned to the NFL as an offensive coordinator for the Buffalo Bills (1997-1998). After Hall of Fame coach Marv Levy retired partially due to his refusal to fire Henning, he left Buffalo.

    More recently, he was the offensive coordinator for the Carolina Panthers from 2002 until January 2007. Henning helped lead his team to the Super Bowl after the 2003 season. After the 2005 season in which the Panthers returned to the NFC Championship game, they were considered Super Bowl contenders in 2006. However, the offense struggled due to injuries and what critics deemed conservative play-calling by Henning, resulting in an 8-8 season and his firing


    I will always remember NFL Films catching Dan on the side lines yelling BILLAY! BILLAY! BILLLLLLLAY! helplessly on the side lines.
     
  12. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Bobby Ross
    1992-96

    50-36-0, .581

    Robert Joseph Ross (December 23, 1936, Richmond, Virginia) is a retired football coach. His career as a head coach included stints at The Citadel, the University of Maryland and Georgia Tech, in the National Football League with the San Diego Chargers and Detroit Lions, and at Army.

    Highlights of his coaching career include winning a share of the National Championship at Georgia Tech in 1990, and guiding the San Diego Chargers to an appearance in Super Bowl XXIX. He owns a career record of 100-92-2 throughout 16 seasons as a collegiate head coach, and a 77-68 record as a head coach in the NFL. The lowlight of his career was him quitting as coach of the Detroit Lions during the 2000 season.

    After graduating from Benedictine High School in 1955, he enrolled at the Virginia Military Institute, where he started at quarterback and defensive back for two seasons and served as captain of the football team as a senior. Ross graduated from VMI in 1959 with a bachelor of arts degree in English and History.
     
  13. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Kevin Gilbride
    1997-98

    6-16, .272

    This tool of a head coach derailed the Chargers for years to come...

    SAN DIEGO (AP) -- The San Diego Chargers fired coach Kevin Gilbride today following the NFL team's fourth straight loss and replaced him with offensive coordinator June Jones, who will be interim coach.
     
  14. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    June Jones
    1998

    3-7, .300

    San Diego
    Jones returned to coaching when the San Diego Chargers hired him as quarterbacks coach on January 20, 1998. On October 13, 1998, head coach Kevin Gilbride was let go after the sixth game and Jones became the interim head coach. In games coached by Jones, the Chargers won three of ten games, giving Jones a career NFL coaching record of 22 wins and 36 losses.[7]
     
  15. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Mike Riley
    1999-2001

    14-34, .292

    *SIGH*

    Mike Riley (b. 1952 Wallace, Idaho) is the head coach of the Oregon State University Beavers football program, returning to the job after a stint in the NFL as the head coach of the San Diego Chargers. Riley was 14-34 in three seasons as head coach. His last game was indicative of his last season, as the Chargers played well, but one poor play turned the tide. The 2001 Chargers ended their season in Week 16, with a loss to the Seattle Seahawks, after Doug Flutie passed for 377 yards and drove for the tying field goal with 16 seconds remaining, but poor special teams allowed a kick to be returned 64 yards to set up a 54-yard field goal.

    Riley coached the Winnipeg Blue Bombers of the Canadian Football League for the 1987-90 seasons and won two Grey Cups during that time. He also coached the San Antonio Riders of the defunct World League of American Football.

    Riley grew up watching the Beavers while his father, Bud Riley, served as defensive coordinator under legendary coach Dee Andros from 1965-1972. Riley was a hometown hero himself, as he was the starting quarterback who led the Corvallis High School Spartans to the state football title in 1970.

    Riley played college football at the University of Alabama under legendary head coach Paul "Bear" Bryant and was a player when the Crimson Tide won the 1973 national championship.

    He considers the college town of Corvallis, Oregon his hometown.

    After starting the 2006 season 2-3, the Beavers went 9-4 on the regular season, including an upset of #3 USC in Corvallis. The Beavers completed their impressive season with a win over Missouri in the Brut Sun Bowl in El Paso, Texas, ending their season with a 10-4 record.

    Riley has a perfect 3-0 NCAA football bowl record as a head coach having gone to and won bowl games three of the last four years (2003 Las Vegas Bowl, 2004 Insight Bowl, 2006 Sun Bowl). Overall, he's 6-0 in bowl games as a head coach and assistant coach combined.
     
  16. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Marty Schottenheimer
    2002-2006

    47-33, .588

    San Diego Chargers head coach Marty Schottenheimer was axed Monday night, less than a month after he agreed to stay.

    Schottenheimer, 63, led the Chargers to a 14-2 record last season — the best in the NFL — but he was fired over what Chargers president Dean Spanos felt was a "dysfunctional" relationship between the head coach and general manager A.J. Smith.

    "In the plainest possible language, we have a dysfunctional situation here," Spanos said in a statement released late Monday.

    "Today, I am resolving that situation once and for all."

    Asked about his untenable relationship with Smith, Schottenheimer said: "There is, and has been, no relationship. In the last couple of years, there has been very little, if any, dialogue."

    "My approach might have been a little different than his," Smith conceded. "It is more the actual working relationship that's been difficult."
     
  17. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Norv Turner
    2007-Present

    The San Diego Chargers hired Norv Turner as head coach on Monday.

    It is the third head coaching job for Turner, who spent last season as the offensive co-ordinator for the San Francisco 49ers.

    Turner replaces Marty Schottenheimer, who was fired last Monday.

    "He is, without a doubt, the right choice for this position," Chargers president Dean Spanos said.

    Turner is 58-82-1 in nine seasons as an NFL head coach, seven with the Washington Washington and two for the Oakland Raiders.

    He served as San Diego's offensive co-ordinator under then-head coach Mike Riley in 2001.
     
  18. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Sid Gilman is the winningest Coach in Charger history followed closely by Marty Schottenheimer
     
  19. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    The biggest pieces of **** for Chargers Head Coaches were:

    1. HARLAND SVARE (CHARLIE WALLER SUCKED *** AS WELL BUT HARLAND EFFING SUCKED SO.....)
    2. MIKE RILEY
    3. KEVIN GILBRIDE
    4. DAN HENNING

    May all these dudes eat ****.
    :icon_evil:
     

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