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Chargers: Where are they now? Part Duex

Discussion in 'Chargers Fan Forum' started by Concudan, Jul 4, 2006.

  1. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Natrone Means
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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    Natrone Means (born April 26, 1972 in Harrisburg, North Carolina) is a former American Football running back who played for the San Diego Chargers the Jacksonville Jaguars, and the Carolina Panthers of the NFL. Means was drafted in the second round of the 1993 draft, picked 41st overall.

    Means played from 1993 to the 1995 for the Chargers. Means was a Pro Bowler after the 1994 season. He was waived before the 1996 season and signed with the Jaguars. Means returned to San Diego as an unrestricted free agent in 1998, but left as a free agent for the Panthers in 2000. Means retired after the 2000 season.

    Natrone Means is married to his college sweetheart. They have 3 daughters. He currently coaches at the college level at Livingstone College in North Carolina.

    [edit]
    High school career
    Natrone Means attended Central Cabbarus High School in Concord, North Carolina. As a senior, he was named the Conference Player of the Year, County Player of the Year, and a Parade All-American, and posted 2023 rushing yards and 33 touchdowns.

    [edit]
    College career
    Natrone Means attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and finished his career with 605 rushing attempts for 3,074 yards (5.1 yards per rushing attempt avg.), and 34 touchdowns, and hauled in 61 receptions for 500 yards (8.19 yards per rec. avg.). He rushed for more than 1,000 yards as both, a sophomore and as a junior.

    Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natrone_Means"

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natrone_Means

    Natrone Means makes a run at a new job: college coaching

    SALISBURY, N.C. – Natrone Means made his living running straight at – and sometimes over – tacklers. Yet the big, bruising NFL back seemed to be doing his best to sidestep the next step in a life built on football.
    After injuries ended his playing days, Means dabbled in real estate. He played golf. He started a youth football association. But he just couldn't get away from the pull of the sport he had played since he was 7.

    Finally, he succumbed and became a coach.
    "It almost seems like I was kind of running away from coaching," he said.

    Means, who helped the San Diego Chargers reach the Super Bowl, is in his first season coaching running backs at Livingstone, a Division II school with about 1,000 students approximately 40 miles from Charlotte. The packed stadiums and cozy player lounges of his playing days have given way to a small practice field lined by a chain-link fence on a residential street.

    For the rest of the article:
    http://www.signonsandiego.com/sports/college_football/20051024-1233-fbc-sportsshowcase.html
     
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  2. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Charlie Joiner:

    Biography

    Charlie Joiner's career began in 1969 with the Houston Oilers in the AFL (the AFC didn't exist!). After 3 1/2 year stints with the Oilers and Bengals, respectively, Charlie joined the Chargers in 1976, where his stats began to pick up speed. That year, working with Receivers Coach Bill Walsh, he turned in his best season to date, catching 50 passes for 1,056 yards and 7 TDs. Gaudy totals for a 14-game schedule.

    But by 1978, Charlie was again pulling down 30 or so passes per season. A steady contributor with a respectable career, most NFL experts likely thought Joiner's 10-year career was nearing its end.

    In fact, it was just beginning.

    Over the next 8 seasons, Charlie would establish himself as the most productive wide receiver in the history of the NFL. He was also the most consistent performer in the entire Air Coryell cast.

    Joiner was the ultimate role player in Coryell's potent offense--Mr. Third Down. Yes, Chandler, Jefferson, and Winslow racked up more impressive single-season numbers than Joiner, but on third-and-10 in the fourth quarter, Dan Fouts inevitably looked for Charlie.

    You could also say that Joiner's teammates and coaches had a fairly high opinion of him:

    "Charlie is the most intelligent and perceptive receiver the game has ever seen." Bill Walsh, former Head Coach and now General Manager of the San Francisco 49ers. 2

    "Without question, he is the finest technician in the NFL, running routes and reading coverages. He is absolutely amazing." Ernie Zampese, Offensive Coordinator for San Diego, Dallas, and now New England. 3

    "I know where he will be. I know what he will do. I know that if I get the ball to him, he will catch it. What more can I say?" Dan Fouts. 1

    At the time of his retirement, Charlie Joiner had more receptions than any other player in the history of the NFL, surpassing Charley Taylor's previously "insurmountable" total of 649 in 1984. Other players have since passed Joiner's career total of 750 catches, but the NFL ensured Charlie's place among the all-time greats by inducting him into the Hall of Fame in 1996, an honor he undoubtedly deserves.

    http://jpj.net/~mikeg/Player Profiles/joiner.htm

    Charles Joiner Jr. (Born October 14, 1947, in Many, Louisiana) is a former football player who starred in the NFL for eighteen seasons, virtually exclusively at the position of wide receiver. He was elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1996.

    Joiner graduated from Grambling State University in 1969 and was drafted in the fourth round by the American Football League's Houston Oilers, with whom he played until 1972, when he was traded to Cincinnati. From 1972 to 1975 he played for the Cincinnati Bengals. In 1975 he was traded to the San Diego Chargers, with whom he remained for eleven seasons before retiring as a player after the 1986 season.

    It was with the Chargers' high flying "Air Coryell" offense under coach Don Coryell that Joiner had his most productive years, exceeding 1,000 yards receiving in a season four times and going to three Pro Bowls (1976, 1979-80). Joiner holds the NFL record for the most games played at wide receiver. Joiner was selected All-Pro in 1980 and 2nd Team All-AFC in 1976.

    In addition to good health and longevity, Joiner was an intelligent player and precise pass route runner. Following his playing career, Joiner successfully transitioned into a receiver's coach and (as of 2004) is with the Kansas City Chiefs. Joiner was the last former American Football League player (Oilers, 1969) to retire from professional football, in 1986

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlie_Joiner
     
  3. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Q&A with Charlie Joiner

    Profootballhof.com: Charlie, first of all, many emails came in this week asking about your coaching career since you left the game. As a receivers coach for the Chiefs, do you still maintain an allegiance to the Chargers after so many years in San Diego as player and then a coach?
    CJ: I guess a little bit. You find yourself rooting for them a little bit except when they do play the Chiefs. There's loyalty there, but mostly as a player. I think once I became a coach, my loyalty lied with the team I was coaching for. Sometimes, I feel for the players, but when I go against them, I always root for the team I'm with now. And, I try to coach the heck out of our players so we can try to defeat that team whenever we're playing them.

    Dear Mr. Joiner, during your career, you played under a number of renowned head coaches starting with Wally Lemm and Ed Hughes in Houston followed by the legendary Paul Brown at Cincinnati, and under both Tommy Prothro and Don 'Air' Coryell in San Diego. Of all of the above coaches, which coach ran the toughest training camp and do you have any particularly interesting memories of any particular training camp?
    CJ: As far as a training camp was concerned I think the toughest training camp may have been when I was in Houston. And, I think it was tough not because of the coaches, it was tough because of the conditions. Our training camp was in Kerrville, Texas and it was about 110 every day. It was really hot in southwest Texas. So, I would have to say that may have been the toughest training camp in my entire career.

    Mr. Joiner, What are the most challenging aspects of coaching wide receivers of a different era than the one in which you played? Best wishes for continued success. - David Nagel, Altamonte Springs, FL
    CJ: Well, I'm not challenged really. I think you handle all the kids the same way no matter what era you're in. You just try to teach them and get them to perform the best as they can on Sunday. I don't really have a problem. There's no difference to me right now. Kids may come out of different programs. You still got to train them yourself. You've got to train them to do the things you want them to do. I really haven't had any problems with the different eras in coaching the kids that are coming out of school now.


    Charlie, for most of my childhood years, my family, had Charger season tickets, so I was fortunate to see you and the rest of the "Air Coryell" offense in action. I'd like to know, what was your most memorable victory, as a San Diego Charger, and also your most, disappointing loss?
    CJ: The best victory was beating Denver on Monday night TV to go to the playoffs. It was 1979, the last game of the year. The winner go to the playoffs, the loser didn't. Probably, the worst defeat is when the Raiders beat us in the AFC championship game that very same year.

    Do you see any wide receivers playing today that closely resemble your type of playing style, if so who?
    CJ: I think a lot teams have those kind of players. The Rams for one. The Chiefs for another. The Buffalo Bills right now. Arizona kids. They all remind me of the way we played because they're taught the same systems.

    For the full article:
    http://www.profootballhof.com/history/release.jsp?release_id=450
     
  4. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Dan Fouts

    http://www.profootballhof.com/hof/member.jsp?player_id=71

    Dan Fouts, an All-Pac 8 quarterback at the University of Oregon, was the third-round draft pick of the San Diego Chargers in 1973. He played for the Chargers for 15 seasons before retiring after the 1987 campaign.

    Although the 6-3, 204-pounder battled injuries for much of his career, he played a major role in transforming the Chargers from also-rans to AFC Western division champions in 1979, 1980 and 1981. While he never led his team to a Super Bowl, Fouts nevertheless won widespread acclaim as one of the truly outstanding passers of his era.

    In 15 seasons, Fouts completed 3,297 passes for 43,040 yards and 254 touchdowns and an 80.2-point rating. He also rushed for 476 yards and scored 13 touchdowns. At the time of his retirement, he was one of only three quarterbacks to pass for more than 40,000 yards. He led the NFL in passing yardage four straight years from 1979 to 1982, and became the first player in history to throw for 4,000 yards in three consecutive seasons.

    Fouts was the AFC Player of the Year in 1979 and then, in 1982, he was named the NFL Most Valuable Player by the Pro Football Writers of America, the AFC Player of the Year by United Press International and the NFL Offensive Player of the Year by Associated Press. He was also an All-Pro choice in 1979, 1982, and 1985 and All-AFC in 1979 and 1982.

    He played in six Pro Bowls in a seven-year span. In both 1980 and 1981, Fouts led the Chargers to the AFC championship game. The Oakland Raiders defeated the Chargers 34-27 in 1980 in spite of Fouts' 336-yard, two-touchdown passing performance. The 1981 AFC title game was played in 59-below-zero wind chill conditions. Still, Fouts completed 15 passes for 185 yards and the Chargers’ only touchdown, a 33-yard pass to Kellen Winslow, in a hard-fought loss to the Cincinnati Bengals.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Daniel Francis Fouts (born June 10, 1951 in San Francisco, California) was an American football quarterback in the National Football League for the San Diego Chargers from 1973 through 1987.

    Fouts's father, Bob Fouts, was a long-time announcer for the San Francisco 49ers, and Dan was a ball boy for the team while growing up.

    Drafted in the third round out of the University of Oregon, Fouts helped lead the Chargers to the playoffs from 1979 to 1982 and twice to the AFC title game (1980 and 1981). He led the league four times in passing yards; ending his career with over 40,000, the third player to surpass that landmark. Fouts was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1993.

    Fouts was a 6 time Pro-Bowl selection (1979-1983 & 1985) and compiled passer ratings over 90.0 for a 3 year stretch (1981-83). Fouts threw for over 4,000 yards for 3 consecutive seasons (1979-81), led the NFL in passing yards in 4 consecutive seasons(1997-1982) and 6 times eclipsed the 20 Touchdown mark with a career high 33 in 1981. Fouts garnered All-Pro selections in both 1979 and 1982, while also being named 2nd Team All-Pro in 1980 and 1985. In addition Fouts was also named 2nd Team All-AFC in 1981 and 1983. However, Fouts and the Chargers lost both AFC Championship Games they played in (the first one, in January, 1981, was played in San Diego).

    Fouts's first few years in the league were inauspicious, but with the arrival of Don "Air" Coryell in 1978 the Chargers' fortunes turned. Yet it was actually two years earlier, with the arrival of Bill Walsh as the Charger's offensive coordinator, that the seeds of success were planted. Under Coryell, the Chargers were known for the deep passing game and the involvement of the tight end as a key receiver. This required a tough, intelligent quarterback with a strong arm. Fouts filled the bill.

    Fouts was not a mobile quarterback and the deep passing game led to many hits. Fouts's ability to take punishment and still play at a very high level is unique. Rarely using the shotgun, Fouts would drop back from center and look for one of a bevy of great receivers. Wide receiver Charlie Joiner and tight end Kellen Winslow were the most famous, both now in the Hall of Fame, but John Jefferson and Wes Chandler, among others, were key. Pass protection was also critical for such an offense. The Chargers had an excellent offensive line which protected Fouts well, and included 4 time Pro-Bowler Ed White, 5 time Pro-Bowler Russ Washington, 3 time Pro-Bowler Doug Wilkerson, Billy Shields and Don Macek.

    Despite going to the playoffs from 1979 through 1982 and playing in 2 AFC Championship Games, the Chargers never went to the Super Bowl under Fouts (although they went 7 years after his retirement). Usually this is attributed to poor defense—yet the Chargers defense led the league in 1978. In Fouts's prime the defense was not as stellar, but the running game became far better with the additions of Chuck Muncie, James Brooks and Lionel James. The defense was good when the passing game was just starting to gel, but as the offense became truly great, the defense was slipping a notch from championship form. Overall, the Chargers achieved three wins against four losses in the playoffs under Fouts. One of their more notable wins was a game known in NFL Lore as The Epic In Miami, where Fouts led his team to victory by completing 33 of 53 passes for a franchise record 433 yards and 3 touchdowns. His completions, attempts, and yards in the game were all NFL posteason records.

    Fouts finished his 15 NFL seasons with 3,297 of 5,604 completions for 43,040 yards and 254 touchdowns, with 242 interceptions. He also rushed for 476 yards and 13 touchdowns

    Dan Fouts is one of only six quarterbacks in NFL history that have achieved two consecutive (back-to-back) 30-touchdown passing seasons at least one time in their careers. The others are Steve Bartkowski, Brett Favre, Dan Marino, Jeff Garcia and Y.A. Tittle. He was also the third quarterback in NFL history to reach the 40,000 passing yards milestone, after fellow hall of famers Johnny Unitas and Fran Tarkenton.

    Fouts' jersey number, 14, is one of two such numbers retired by the Chargers.

    Fouts's post-NFL career included a well-received commentator role on ABC's Monday Night Football, alongside famed MNL anchor Al Michaels and comedian Dennis Miller. Currently, Fouts is a sportscaster for ABC, teamed with Keith Jackson. Fouts's broadcast partner for 2006 is to be determined now that Jackson has opted to permanently retire.

    Supertramp is his favorite band.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_Fouts
     
  5. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    http://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/FoutDa00.htm

    http://www.nfl.com/news/hof/000728fouts.html

    Hall of Fame chat: Dan Fouts

    CANTON, Ohio (July 28, 2000) — The San Diego Chargers won three AFC West titles with Dan Fouts at quarterback. He was only the third player in NFL history to pass for more than 40,000 yards, finishing his career with 43,040 yards and 254 touchdowns passing.

    Fouts is pulling double duty this weekend in Canton. Not only is he there to participate in Pro Football's Greatest Reunion, he's starting his new job in the booth for Monday Night Football, along with Al Michaels and Dennis Miller.

    Fouts answered fan questions about his career, the game today and his feelings on who's the greatest quarterback ever. Here is an edited transcript of his chat.

    Dan Fouts: This is a great weekend for the Hall of Fame and it's great to back in Canton and especially to see how generous the league has been to invite the members back.

    Eric: How excited are you for the new Monday Night gig?

    Dan Fouts: Extremely excited. Very anxious to get started to see how funny Dennis is going to be and how well all five of us are going to work together. We've had four or five sessions together in the studio the last three weeks.

    David D: Dan, which game do you remember most ?

    Dan Fouts: The 1982 AFC Divisional Playoff is the one everybody remembers most so I'm forced to recall that one a lot. We had a lot of exciting games with the Chargers but that certainly was the most meaningful game.

    Ron: Dan, do quarterbacks nowadays get less of a chance to showcase their talent because of the way the game is played?

    Dan Fouts: On the contrary, all you have to do is look at Kurt Warner and see how much opportunity he has to throw to those great receivers. I think the game is more wide open now than it has ever been.

    Jeff Gribble: Dan, I'm a Bronco fan, but I admired your tenacity during your time with San Diego. How did you rate the Denver Orange Crush defense in your day and can you contrast it with today's? Thanks!

    Dan Fouts: The Orange Crush was a very intelligent defense and they always seem to be in the right place at the right time. Their defensive coordinator, Joel Collier, was one of the best and most challenging coaches I have ever faced.

    Mark Eckblad: Dan, after a Hall of Fame NFL career, how does a player prevent life in retirement from seeming anticlimactic? Dan Fouts: He doesn't. He just has to accept that it's never going to be as exciting, thrilling, fulfilling as playing in the NFL.

    Jarrod: Mr. Fouts, who do you think is the greatest quarterback of all time and where do you rank yourself?

    Dan Fouts: I think John Unitas is the greatest QB of all time and I rank myself as a proud member of the Hall of Fame.

    Tim Knight: Dan, How do you feel about Dennis Miller being in the booth? Do you think he will be able to add anything other than humor to the commentary?

    Dan Fouts: I think Dennis Miller will surprise a lot of people with his depth of his knowledge about the NFL. He grew up as a fan of the Steelers and has already displayed to Al and myself that he knows what he's talking about. But he better be funny!

    Moderator: Thanks for sitting down with us Dan! Anything you want to add?

    Dan Fouts: Enjoy Monday night this season. It should be a lot of fun and entertaining.
     
  6. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Bobby Ross

    Bobby Ross returns to coaching by taking Army job
    WEST POINT, N.Y. (AP) — Bobby Ross became Army's head football coach Tuesday, giving a team on a record losing streak a leader with Super Bowl and national college championship experience.
    Ross, 66, returns to football after resigning as the Detroit Lions' coach three years ago. He said his past service in the Army and his sons' military background — one graduated from the Naval Academy, another from the Air Force Academy — made him a good fit for the job at the storied military academy.

    "I believe I understand the mission of West Point. I do. I believe in it strongly," Ross said at a news conference introducing him as coach.

    Ross noted that his father had an appointment to West Point during the Depression, but had to pass it up to work.

    "I believe I'm going to have the opportunity to fulfill my father's dream," he said.

    Under a multiyear contract, Army gets a veteran coach they hope will turn around a team that became the first in NCAA history to finish 0-13 after losing to Navy 34-6 on Saturday. The academy fired coach Todd Berry in October with the team 5-35 in his four seasons. John Mumford acted as interim coach, going 0-7 after replacing Berry.

    Army would not disclose the terms of the contract.

    For the rest of the article:
    http://www.usatoday.com/sports/college/football/cusa/2003-12-09-army-ross_x.htm
     
  7. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    NFL: CHARGERS: Where are they now? Rod Bernstine

    Two years into his pro career, the 238-pound Bernstine was moved to running back where he again found himself behind one of the greatest Chargers to play his position.
    It’s become routine for former Chargers tight end Rod Bernstine. Twice a year, he finds himself torn between the team that drafted him and the team with which he wrapped up his nine-year playing career.

    Bernstine spent the first six years of his NFL playing career as a member of the Chargers and finished his playing days with a three-year stint with the Broncos. Exactly where do his loyalties fall?

    “I kind of consider myself just a former football player,” Bernstine said. “I love the Chargers. I watch them and cheer for them regularly. People always ask me which organization I liked the best, and that’s like asking which one of your children is your favorite. I do have a special place for the Chargers though because they gave me my opportunity. They provided a great environment for me and they’re a great organization.”

    Bernstine joined the Bolts in 1987 when then Director of Football Operations Steve Ortmayer used a first-round pick to select the Texas A&M tight end. The move raised eyebrows at the time because the team already had Kellen Winslow, Eric Sievers and Pete Holohan at the position.

    For the full article:
    http://www.noticias.info/asp/aspComunicados.asp?nid=137315&src=0
     
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  8. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    NFL: CHARGERS: Where are they now: John Jefferson

    It’s been 20 years since John “J.J.” Jefferson laced up the cleats, but the former Chargers wide receiver can’t seem to get football out of his system. He’s found ways to stay connected with the game he loves.

    ”I don’t know if I’ll ever be away from football,” Jefferson said. “I enjoy watching all the teams and keeping track of what’s going on in both the professional and college games. It’s a part of me.”

    As the 14th overall pick in the 1978 draft, Jefferson immediately established himself in the then newly branded “Air Coryell” offense. While in San Diego, Jefferson donned the cover of Sports Illustrated as the “Touchdown Man” and quickly became a fan favorite.

    He made the Pro Bowl in each of his three seasons with the Chargers and led the NFL in touchdown catches as a rookie. Following the 1980 season, Jefferson was traded to Green Bay where he played four seasons before finishing his career with Marty Schottenheimer’s Cleveland Browns in 1985.

    Unlike many former NFL players who pursue careers in coaching or broadcasting, Jefferson found his niche in the front office. He currently serves as Director of Player Development with the Washington Redskins.

    For the full article:
    http://www.noticias.info/asp/aspComunicados.asp?nid=139895&src=0
     
  9. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Ronnie Harmon

    Harmon answers call


    When Hayden Fry speaks, you can expect Don Patterson to listen.

    That helps to explain how former Iowa running back and NFL veteran Ronnie Harmon recently became a member of Patterson's coaching staff at Western Illinois.

    Patterson was searching for a new running backs coach in June when his former boss recommended Harmon for the position.

    Intrigued by Fry's recommendation, Patterson tracked down Harmon in his home state of New York, where he was coaching high school football.

    To say that Harmon, a native of Laurelton, N.Y., was interested in joining Patterson's staff would be an understatement.

    Harmon accepted the job without even visiting the Western Illinois campus in Macomb, Ill.

    "When he asked, I was honored that he wanted me to be a part of this," Harmon said. "I didn't even have to come here.

    "I just said, 'Yes.'"

    Harmon, 39, said he trusted Patterson enough to accept the job immediately. They have known each other for more than two decades.

    For the full article:
    http://www.hawkcentral.com/teams/football/2003/081703harmon.htm
     
  10. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    OK Charger fans, I got this going, now lets keep it going. Got some info on a Charger of yor? Post it, wana talk about your impressions of the ex-Chargers, lets talk about it.

    Chargersville! Respond to me!
     
  11. RMANCIL

    RMANCIL New Member

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    I thought he was going to have a big career when I saw him play but his injuries seemed to rob him every time he was about to get untracked.

    Great reads thanks
     
  12. Thumper

    Thumper WHS

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    Where are they now? Chuck Muncie

    http://www.thinkwebworks.com/redraidernation/PAGES/Where.asp

    I used to go to the Old Ox in PB. Never knew Muncie was a bouncer over there.
    http://www.sandiegomag.com/issues/november96/whatever.shtml

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chuck_Muncie
    http://cache.zoominfo.com/CachedPag...06+7:17:08+AM&firstName=Chuck&lastName=Muncie
     
  13. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    http://www.profootballhof.com/history/team.jsp?franchise_id=27

    The Chargers were born on August 14, 1959, when Barron Hilton, a 32-year-old hotel executive, was awarded a franchise for Los Angeles in the new American Football League. Even though they won the AFL Western division championship in 1960, the Los Angeles Chargers received meager fan support so Hilton, buoyed by the encouragement of San Diego sports editor Jack Murphy, moved his team 120 miles south to San Diego in 1961. Historic Balboa Stadium was expanded to 34,000 capacity to accommodate the Chargers.

    In San Diego, the Chargers, spurred by coach Sid Gillman, developed into one of the true glamour teams of any decade. Gillman's first teams were high-scoring, crowd-pleasing juggernauts that won divisional championships five of the AFL's first six years and the AFL title with a 51-10 win over Boston in 1963. Such stars as wide receiver Lance Alworth, running backs Keith Lincoln and Paul Lowe and quarterback John Hadl not only made the Chargers a winning team, they also provided image, impetus and respect for the entire AFL that was fighting a life-and-death struggle with the established and well-financed NFL. Gillman, Alworth and tackle Ron Mix, another 1960s superstar, are now members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
     
  14. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Firsts, Records, Odds & Ends

    Original Franchise Location: The Chargers moved to San Diego in 1961, after one season in Los Angeles.

    First Regular-Season Game: A 21-20 victory over the Dallas Texans, 9/10/60.

    First Winning Season: 1960 (10-4).

    First Playoff Appearance: A 24-16 loss to the Houston Oilers in the American Football League Championship game, 1/1/61.

    First All-League Selections: T Ron Mix, QB Jack Kemp, HB Paul Lowe, DT Volney Peters, DB Dick Harris, 1960.

    First Charger Elected to the Hall of Fame: WR Lance Alworth, 1978.

    First to Rush 100 Yards in a Game: Paul Lowe, 137 yards vs. the Boston Patriots, 10/28/60.

    First 1,000-Yard Rusher: Paul Lowe, 1,010 yards (1963).

    First to Pass 400 Yards in a Game: Dan Fouts, 444 yards vs. the New York Giants, 10/19/80.

    Most Yards Rushing, Career: LaDainian Tomlinson, 7,361 yards (2001-05).

    Most Yards Passing, Career: Dan Fouts, 43,040 yards (1973-1987).

    Most Receptions, Career: Charlie Joiner, 586 receptions (1976-1986).

    All-Time Leading Scorer: John Carney, 1,076 points (1990-2000).

    It's A Fact: The Chargers' uniform was unveiled on March 20, 1960. Models for the uniform were future Hall of Famer Ron Mix and quarterback/Congressman Jack Kemp.

    Warmest Game in Team History: 108 degrees vs. the Raiders at Los Angeles, 9/4/88.

    Longest Interception Return: Vencie Glenn's 103-yard return vs. the Denver Broncos on 11/29/87.

    http://www.profootballhof.com/history/team.jsp?franchise_id=27
     
  15. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    http://www.profootballhof.com/hof/member.jsp?player_id=16

    LANCE ALWORTH

    Al Davis was an assistant coach with the 1962 San Diego Chargers of the American Football League when he signed a flanker Lance Alworth to a contract after a spirited bidding battle with the National Football League’s San Francisco 49ers.

    Davis recalls his feelings when he snagged this first big AFL prize of the budding inter-league war of the 1960s. "Lance Alworth was one of maybe three players in my lifetime who had what I would call ‘it.’ You could see right from the start that he was going to be a super-star."

    Lance epitomized the glamorous, crowd-pleasing, deadly effective approach to football the Chargers exhibited in the early years of the AFL, enjoying nine exceptional years in San Diego before shifting to Dallas for a final two years with the 1971 and 1972 Cowboys. His patented leaping catches and blazing after-the-catch runs are legendary. Statistics many times are misleading, but in Alworth's case, they are not.

    Use the link to see the full article.
     
  16. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    SID GILLMAN

    http://www.profootballhof.com/hof/member.jsp?player_id=76

    After Bronko Nagurski flattened him in the first College All-Star game in 1934, Sid Gillman decided he might have a better future in coaching. It was a sound career decision. He began his coaching career, however, in an era that taught that running the ball was the surest way to victory.

    It was a philosophy with which he disagreed. “The big play comes with the pass,” he would tell anyone who would take time to listen. “God bless those runners because they get you the first down, give you ball control and keep your defense off the field. But if you want to ring the cash register, you have to pass.”

    Sid went on to become the foremost authority on forward passing offense. He was the first coach to produce divisional champions in both the National and American Football Leagues. Gillman’s first pro coaching job came in 1955 when he became the Los Angeles Rams head coach. In his first year he led the team to a division crown.

    Use the link to see the full article.
     
  17. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    RON MIX

    http://www.profootballhof.com/hof/member.jsp?player_id=153

    The most amazing aspect of the Ron Mix story is that he played football at all. In high school, he really wanted to play baseball, was fairly successful in track but somehow ended up playing football, a sport he really didn’t like.

    Ron did well enough to earn a scholarship to the University of Southern California. With the Trojans, he put on some weight, became an excellent offensive tackle, and attracted the attention of scouts from both the National Football League and the new American Football League.

    Use the link to see the full article.
     
  18. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    KELLEN WINSLOW

    http://www.profootballhof.com/hof/member.jsp?player_id=233

    Kellen Winslow, a 6-5, 250-pound tight end played for the San Diego Chargers from 1979 to 1987. To get the draft rights to the All-America from the University of Missouri, the Chargers engineered a draft-day trade with the Cleveland Browns. The Chargers then made Winslow their first-round pick and the 13th player selected overall choice in the 1979 draft.

    Winslow went on to play in five Pro Bowls and was the co-Player of the Game in the 1982 game. Kellen got off to a quick start as a rookie with 25 catches before being sidelined by a knee injury in the seventh game. He returned in 1980 with career-high 89 receptions for 1,290 yards. He had 88 catches both in 1981 and 1983 and 319 in a four-year period from 1980 to 1983.

    A second-knee injury forced him to miss 17 games in 1984 and 1985. But he returned to his old form late in 1985 and 1986 and he earned his fifth Pro Bowl berth following the 1987 season after a four-year absence. A knee injury suffered in the 12th game in 1987 eventually forced his retirement.

    Use the link to see the full article.
     
  19. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    Screw Rod Bernsteine.

    That SOB sent his brother/cousin/posse after one of our tailgaters and sucker punched him in the parking lot. Everything related to Rod Bernstein sucks.
     
  20. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Ronald Jack Mix

    Mix is considered one of the greatest linemen to ever play the game. His coach with the San Diego Chargers, Hall of Famer Sid Gillman said, "Ron Mix was one of the greats of all time...I think he's the greatest tackle who ever lived."
    During his entire 12-year career, Ron was assessed only two (!) holding penalties. Mix was the first draft pick of both the NFL's Baltimore Colts, and the AFL's Boston Patriots. The Patriots traded their rights to Mix to the San Diego Chargers, with whom he signed. He was one of the first major players who chose the AFL over the NFL. His career as a lineman -- so often an unsung position -- was so splendid that Ron had his jersey number, 74, retired by the Chargers.

    Mix studied law at night during the football season and became known as the "intellectual assassin." He also became executive counsel of the San Diego Chargers after his playing days. Ron then turned to private practice in San Diego, often representing retired players in workmen's compensation claims for athletic-related injuries.

    Birth and Death Dates:
    b. March 10, 1938

    Career Highlights:
    Mix attended the USC (University of Southern California) on a football scholarship and entered school as a 180-pound end. By the time he graduated, he was up to 250 pounds due to an intensive weight-training program. Hall of Famer Al Davis, one of Ron's coaches at USC said, "Mix has complete dedication, great speed, pride, and is a tremendous hitter. Hard work was his answer to changing average ability to great ability."

    A three-year starter, Ron captained the 1959 team that had a record of 8-2-0 and tied for first in the Pacific Coast Conference. After winning their first eight games, the Trojans lost their final two to UCLA and Notre Dame and finished the season ranked No. 14; USC was banned from postseason play by the NCAA. That season, Mix was named consensus All-America first team, AP All-Pacific Coast first team, All-Big Five first team, MVP USC Lineman Award, and won the Trojaneer Diamond Award as the senior athlete who did the most to further the reputation of USC.

    Use link for full article

    http://www.jewsinsports.org/profile.asp?sport=football&ID=12
     
  21. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Recognition elusive for Paul Lowe

    The record lasted 44 years, from the Chargers' origins in Los Angeles to the third quarter of Sunday's game at Qualcomm Stadium, but when it was gone, Paul Lowe was reluctant to let go.

    He called to say LaDainian Tomlinson had not yet surpassed his team rushing record; that he had been short-changed by the statisticians; that the numbers didn't add up as he remembered.

    Lowe's memory, it turns out, was faulty. He was seeking Chargers credit for yards he had actually gained with the Kansas City Chiefs. It was an honest mistake. Could have happened to anyone.

    But while we're on the subject, if Paul Lowe is undeserving of a recount, perhaps he is entitled to being reconsidered.

    He was the American Football League's rushing champion in 1965 and will forever hold that league's highest career rushing average at 4.9 yards per carry. When the Chargers started their Hall of Fame, Lowe was the third player enshrined, right after Lance Alworth and Ron Mix.

    Yet Lowe is conspicuously absent from the Breitbard Hall of Fame at the San Diego Hall of Champions and he is consistently rankled by what he regards as unpaid respects.

    Use the link for the full article.

    http://www.signonsandiego.com/sports/sullivan/20041009-9999-an.html
     
  22. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keith_Lincoln

    Keith Lincoln

    At Washington State University, Keith Lincoln (born May 8, 1939) was an all-around player and the school's career rushing leader. He maintained his versatility after being drafted by the American Football League's San Diego Chargers in 1961. In 1963 he led the team in rushing, punt return and kickoff return yards. In the 1964 American Football League Championship game, he accounted for 349 yards of total offense as the Chargers defeated the Boston Patriots 51-10.

    A five-time All-American Football League selection (1962, 1963, 1964, 1965 and 1967), Lincoln produced unforgettable plays virtually every season. In 1961 he caught a record-setting 91 yard TD pass; in 1962, he ran a kickoff back for a Chargers' record 103 yards. Lincoln had three games in which he gained 100 or more yards on 14 or fewer carries, and in both 1963 and 1964 was the AFL All-Star Game Most Valuable Player.

    Lincoln is a member of the San Diego Chargers and Washington State University Athletic Halls of Fame.

    In 1995, a panel of experts commissioned by The Spokesman-Review to commemorate the 100th anniversary of football at Washington State University named Lincoln to the school's all-time team. A similar honored was bestowed on him in 1998 when Cougfan.com named him to its all-time Cougar team.

    After retiring from pro football, Lincoln returned to WSU as an assistant coach and then became the school's long-time director of alumni relations
     
  23. ChargerRay

    ChargerRay Producer/Host of BoltTalk Staff Member Super Moderator Podcaster

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Bienemy

    Eric Bienemy

    Eric Bienemy (born August 15, 1969 in New Orleans, Louisiana) was a running back in the National Football League. He was an All-American out of the University of Colorado selected by the San Diego Chargers in the 2nd round of the 1991 NFL Draft.

    Bieniemy lettered in football and track at Bishop Amat High School in La Puente, California, earning second-team All-America honors in football as a senior when he rushed for 2,002 yards and 30 touchdowns.

    He was heavily recruited out of high school and chose the University of Colorado, where he became a member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. Bieniemy's footprints are all over the CU record book, as he remains the school's all-time leader in rushing (3,940 yards), all-purpose yards (4,351), touchdowns (42) and scoring (254 points). He was the nation's second leading rusher in 1990 with 1,628 yards, along with 17 touchdowns, when he finished third in the Heisman Trophy balloting that year behind BYU's Ty Detmer (the winner) and Notre Dame's Raghib Ismail.

    In 1990, he earned unanimous All-America honors. He was a two-time first-team all Big-Eight performer, in 1988 and in 1990, earning the conference's offensive player-of-the-year honor as a senior. As a junior, he was named to CU's prestigious 25-member "All-Century Football Team," the only active player at the time to be selected to the group honoring the first 100 years of Colorado Buffalo football.

    Bienemy's succes in college did not translate into the professional ranks. He played from 1991 til 1999, finishing his career with 1589 yards rushing, 1223 yards receiving, 276 yards returning punts, 1,621 yards on kickoff returns, and 12 touchdowns(11 receiving and 1 kickoff return) while paying for the San Diego Chargers, Cincinnati Bengals and Philadelphia Eagles. He was immortalized by Chris Berman with the nickname Eric "Sleeping with" Bienemy in reference to the movie Sleeping with the Enemy.

    Bieniemy was the UCLA running backs coach for three years. He also assumed the additional responsibilities of recruiting coordinator in 2005. Shortly after UCLA's Sun Bowl Victory in his third season, Bienemy was offered and accepted the position of running backs coach for the Minnesota Vikings.

    Bienemy and his wife, Mia, have two sons, Eric III and Elijah.
     
  24. ChargerRay

    ChargerRay Producer/Host of BoltTalk Staff Member Super Moderator Podcaster

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Babe_Laufenberg

    Babe Laufenberg - Quarterback

    Babe Laufenberg is a former American Football quarterback who played for the New Orleans Saints, San Diego Chargers and Dallas Cowboys. He was drafted with the 168th pick of the NFL draft by the Washington Redskins. He started 8 games for the San Diego Chargers after being dealt from Washington, following the retirement of Chargers' quarterback Dan Fouts.

    Currently, Laufenberg is the lead sports anchor for Dallas CBS affiliate KTVT. He was also the color man on the Cowboys Radio Network from 1996-2005, and hosted the head coach's weekly show during that period. He was replaced in his radio roles in 2006 by former Cowboys safety and pregame show host Charlie Waters.
     
  25. ChargerRay

    ChargerRay Producer/Host of BoltTalk Staff Member Super Moderator Podcaster

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolf_Benirschke

    Rolf Benirschke

    Rolf Benirschke (born February 7, 1955) was a placekicker in the National Football League for the San Diego Chargers from 1978 to 1987.

    Rolf attended La Jolla High School in La Jolla, California. In the 1977 NFL Draft he was the second-to-last pick by the Oakland Raiders, who traded him to San Diego for his rookie year. He attended college at the University of California at Davis.

    In his rookie year in 1978, Rolf made all 12 of his 12 field goals. In the off-season before the 1978 season, his second season, Rolf developed chronic fever, abdominal cramps, and diarrhea. He learned that he had ulcerative colitis, a form of inflammatory bowel disease. Despite staying in the hospital for weeks on end, he made 34 of 38 field goals that year. He was named the NFL Man of the Year in 1983.

    However, the problem worsened in the 1979 season, when, on the team plane coming home from a road trip, Rolf collapsed. He underwent two surgeries to remove his large intestine and he was in the intensive care unit for weeks. When released form the hospital, Rolf was only 123 pounds and had to adjust to life with two ostomy appliances.

    On Sunday, November 18, 1979, Rolf made his dramatic return to the Chargers in a game against the Pittsburgh Steelers. While he did not play, he was named honorary team captain for the game, which was a sellout. Louie Kelcher, a Chargers' defensive tackle, assisted Rolf and held his hand out onto the field. In 1980 Rolf returned to kicking and played seven more seasons with the team before retiring in 1987 as the team's all-time leader in points scored (766).

    One his more memorable moments was when he kicked a game winning field goal in overtime to win a famous game known as The Epic In Miami.

    In his career Rolf has been named the NFL Man of the Year, the NFL Comeback Player of the Year, and the NFL Players' Association's Hero of the Year. In 1997 he was the twentieth player inducted into the San Diego Chargers' Hall of Fame.

    Rolf hosted the TV game show Wheel of Fortune in 1989. Once while hosting, he said on-camera that he did not know what to do in a tie situation. (In this case, no bonus round was played, and all 3 players returned the next day.) In November of 1996 he published his book, Alive and Kicking! Married with four children, Rolf is active in the San Diego, California area, volunteering his time with organizations like the San Diego Zoo, Scripps Hospital, United Way, the Chargers, the Boys & Girls Clubs of East County and the San Diego Blood Bank.

    Every year, Rolf is in charge of the Rolf Benirschke Legacy Golf Invitational, held at the Rancho Santa Fe Farms Golf Club in Rancho Santa Fe, California. Every year, some of the money is donated to charities like the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America.
     
  26. ChargerRay

    ChargerRay Producer/Host of BoltTalk Staff Member Super Moderator Podcaster

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darren_Bennett_(football_player)

    Darren Bennett

    Darren Bennett (born January 9, 1965 in Sydney, New South Wales) is an Australian who had a moderately successful career in Australian Rules football, followed by a far more substantial career in American football as a punter.

    Bennett, who grew up in Perth, spent 12 years playing Aussie Rules at elite level, also played rugby and Australian Rules Football in for a short time in New Zealand. He then spent time with the West Coast Eagles and Melbourne Demons in the VFL / AFL.

    Bennett was known for kicking long goals, torpedo punts and taking strong marks.

    Bennett began with the West Coast Eagles as part of their inaugural squad in 1987. A serious knee injury curtailed his career with the Eagles after four games. Released by the Eagles, he was drafted by the Melbourne Demons at the end of 1988. In both 1989 (34 goals) and 1990 (87 goals) Bennett led the Demons' goal kicking. Bennett's jersey usually carried a white stain on the front, which was merely resin that Bennett used to grip the ball better.

    Some highlights of his career appeared in both VHS/DVD documentaries Miracle Marks and Golden Goals.

    Bennett was regarded as one of Melbourne's finest players in the early 90's. But injuries caught up with him, and he played just two games in 1993. After the season, Bennett quietly retired from AFL, having totalled 78 games and 222 goals.

    Bennett participated in an Australian Football Exhibition Match at SkyDome in Toronto in 1989; it is believed that he was first exposed to American football during that trip.

    He married in 1994 and went on his honeymoon to California, where he contacted the coaching staff of the San Diego Chargers and asked for a tryout. He wound up impressing the Chargers sufficiently that he was placed on the team's practice squad for that season, although he did not play.

    During the spring of 1995, the Chargers sent him to the Amsterdam Admirals of NFL Europe, where he led the league in net punting average and earned all-league honors. That fall, he became the Chargers' regular punter. In his rookie season, he finished second in the NFL in punting average and made the AFC Pro Bowl team. He went on to establish himself as arguably the best punter in the NFL for the rest of the 1990s. Despite only playing in the league for half of that decade, he was named as the punter on the NFL's All-Decade Team for the 1990s.

    On August 7, 1999 Bennett returned home with his adoptive sport and took part in Australia's first American Bowl in Sydney's brand new Stadium Australia versus the Denver Broncos.

    Bennett was named to another Pro Bowl team in 2000, and continued to be one of the league's leading punters into the 21st century. Going into the 2004 season, he had averaged 43.8 yards per punt, averaged 27 punts per season inside the 20-yard-line, and had only three blocked punts in his career (one of which happened when the Chargers had only 10 men on the field). As a former Aussie Rules player, and considerably larger than most specialist kickers in American football (6'5"/1.96 m, 235 lb/106.5 kg), he does not shy away from physical contact on special teams. This was never more evident than when he knocked an opposing punt returner out cold in his rookie season. In 2004, after 144 games for the Chargers, he signed as a free agent with the Vikings, where he spent one season until being cut by Minnesota in September 2005. However, he was recalled by the team in December 2005, after starting punter Chris Kluwe (who had replaced him on the Vikings roster) was injured; Bennett signed to a temporary contract.[1] He played one game before being released by the Vikings, having made what was likely his final NFL appearance after 15 Vikings games and a total of 159 NFL games.

    Bennett and his wife Rosemary divide their time between homes in the San Diego area and Melbourne. They have two sons, one of whom suffers from muscular dystrophy; Bennett is deeply involved with charities associated with that disease.
     
  27. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Great additions CR! Thanks!
     
  28. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Bill Arnsparger

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Arnsparger

    Bill Arnsparger (born December 16, 1926) is a former football coach who was primarily an assistant, but served as head coach at both the professional and collegiate levels.

    A native of Paris, Kentucky, Arnsparger attended Paris High School and became connected with the school's longtime football and basketball coach, Blanton Collier. The relationship would have a major impact on his future career.

    After serving in the U.S. Marines during World War II, Arnsparger graduated from Miami University in January 1950, then served as an assistant at the school that Fall. On February 21, 1951, he was hired by Ohio State University's new head coach Woody Hayes as the squad's line coach. He served in that capacity until 1954, when he re-connected with Collier, who had been hired as head coach at the University of Kentucky.

    Arnsparger remained in the Blue Grass state for the next eight years until Collier was fired on January 2, 1962. During the 1959 season, he was joined on the coaching staff by a young coach who had served at the University of Virginia the previous year. That coach was Don Shula, with the two mentors forging a strong bond that would serve them for much of the next quarter century.

    Arnsparger moved on to an assistant position with Tulane University, but, after two years, resigned the post on March 6, 1964 to become defensive line coach for the Baltimore Colts under Shula. That season, the team reached the NFL Championship game and remained one of the strongest teams of the 1960s, competing in Super Bowl III on January 12, 1969.

    When Shula left to become head coach with the Miami Dolphins after the end of the 1969 NFL season, he brought along Arnsparger. In just two seasons, the formerly moribund team had reached the Super Bowl, with Arnsparger fashioning what became known as the "No-Name Defense". World championships in each of the next two seasons, including an undefeated season during 1972, made Arnsparger a prime candidate for a head coaching position.

    Following the team's 24-7 victory over the Minnesota Vikings in Super Bowl VIII, Arnsparger was named head coach of the New York Giants. However, the success he had enjoyed as an assistant evaporated in his new role, with the Giants managing just seven wins in his 35 games. Arnsparger was fired on October 25, 1976, with the team having lost all seven of its games on the year.

    Just two days after his dismissal, Arnsparger was rehired by Shula as Miami's assistant head coach in charge of the defense. In the team's first game under his leadership, the Dolphins won a 10-3 defensive battle over the New England Patriots, who had averaged 30 points entering the contest.

    Miami finished the 1976 NFL season with a 6-8 mark, then narrowly missed a playoff berth the following season. During the next two seasons, the Dolphins reached the postseason, but dropped their first playoff game. During the strike-shortened 1982 NFL season, Miami finally put things together and reached Super Bowl XVII, but dropped a 27-17 decision to the Washington Redskins.

    On December 2, 1983, Arnsparger was hired as head coach at Louisiana State University, but finished the season with the Dolphins. Spending three years as Tigers' head coach, Arnsparger led his 1986 squad to the school's first Southeastern Conference title since 1970, as well as a berth in the Sugar Bowl. Shortly after accepting the bid, Arnsparger announced he was resigning to become athletic director at the University of Florida.

    In 1989, Arnsparger's new school became embroiled in a series of controversies when it was revealed that head football coach Galen Hall had committed NCAA violations and that two players on his team had admitted gambling on college football games. In addition, questions about the school's men's basketball program also surfaced.

    Despite seeing both teams put on probation, Arnsparger was able to extricate himself from the football problem by hiring Duke University head coach and former Florida Heisman Trophy winner Steve Spurrier. The appointment set the stage for one of the most successful runs for a program during the 1990s.

    On January 13, 1992, Arnsparger resigned to become defensive coordinator of the San Diego Chargers. During his four years, the team's defense showed marked improvement, culminating with an appearance in Super Bowl XXXIX. Just days after the team's appearance, Arnsparger announced his retirement, citing the prostate cancer surgery he had undergone the year before.
     
  29. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Hungry Mims In Trouble

    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/1999/09/29/archive/main64326.shtml

    Chagrined Chris Mims faces discipline from the San Diego Chargers for allegedly assaulting a man and taking his tacos during a confrontation outside a fast-food restaurant.

    The Chargers have made a big public relations push in recent months, so they weren't pleased to see the defensive end's name in a police report.

    "Basically, our club in no way condones any behavior that seems to have occurred here," coach Mike Riley said after practice Wednesday. "I'm very disappointed in that. At the same time, we've dealt with Chris behind our doors and we're making every move to get this thing straightened away."

    Riley said he had imposed some type of discipline, but he wouldn't give specifics.

    "Actually, it's not all completed yet," he said.

    Police are investigating a 23-year-old man's claim that the 300-pound Mims shoved his face into a wall, stole his tacos and struck him twice with a belt early Monday morning, some 10 hours after the Chargers lost their home opener to Indianapolis.

    Michael J. McKinney told police he was attacked after he made a comment about Mims getting out of a limo and then urinating in the parking lot at a downtown Del Taco.

    Mims seemed contrite and embarrassed when he talked with reporters Wednesday.

    "This is the worst thing that probably ever happened to me," he said, noting all the media attention to the incident. "I've just got to deal with it."

    He wouldn't discuss the specifics of what happened, citing legal concerns. "I'm just sorry that this all happened," Mims said.

    He said he wanted to apologize to his family, teammates, the Chargers organization and the fans, who he says have been supportive during his two stints as a Charger.

    Mims wouldn't say if he'd apologized to McKinney. He also wouldn't comment on whether he'd talked to police, who say Mims left the scene before officers arrived.

    McKinney said Wednesday that he hadn't heard from Mims or anyone else with the Chargers.

    Mims spent about 15 minutes on the sideline Wednesday speaking with the team's pastor, Shawn Mitchell. The Chargers' first-round draft pick in 1992, Mims was released in April 1997. He rejoined in June 1998 and has been a reserve ever since.

    Asked if he'd been fined, Mims said: "I'll find out."
     

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