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Chiefs vs. Chargers is Martyball in stereo (Article)

Discussion in 'Chargers Fan Forum' started by nickelbolt, Oct 20, 2006.

  1. nickelbolt

    nickelbolt Fuggedaboutit

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    Chiefs vs. Chargers is Martyball in stereo

    Thursday, October 19, 2006

    Kansas City Chiefs fans came to both love and loathe Martyball.

    They loved it because Martyball – Marty Schottenheimer's brand of power football – allowed the Chiefs to win 102 games in the 1990s. But they came to loathe it because Martyball never could get the Chiefs to a Super Bowl.

    Dick Vermeil arrived in Kansas City this decade and introduced aerial football. The Chiefs regularly ranked in the NFL's Top 5 in passing, offense and scoring but only qualified for the playoffs once in Vermeil's five years.

    Now Vermeil is gone and Herman Edwards has arrived with Martyball II. Chiefs fans will get a stereo dose of Martyball Sunday when the San Diego Chargers visit.

    Schottenheimer now coaches San Diego and has built the 4-1 Chargers in the image of the 1990s Chiefs. LaDainian Tomlinson provides the ground game and the Chargers lead the NFL in defense with a fast, physical front seven.

    But Kansas City fans miss the offensive excitement of the Vermeil era and are slow to warm up to Edward's brand of Martyball. With the Chiefs off to a 2-3 start, the fans are disenchanted with this style of play.

    That doesn't bother Edwards. He was hired to rebuild the Chiefs into a championship contender, and he knew Vermeil's way wasn't working.

    Edwards knows this style of football succeeds. He saw it work as an assistant on Schottenheimer's staff, as an assistant on Tony Dungy's staff at Tampa Bay and finally as the head coach of the Jets. All became playoff teams. But it doesn't happen overnight.

    "There's nothing wrong in playing that way," Edwards said. "It's very disciplined football. You're going to be physical, you're going to have a good defense, you can run the ball and you're not going to beat yourself with penalties.

    "It's a good way to play, a sound way to play and it's a way that you like to play because you know in the end you've got a tough football team."

    E-mail rgosselin@dallasnews.com
    --------------------------------------------------------------
    I think the game will be closer than we'd like, but I also think PR's gonna air it out... and leave queefs fans drooling for Air Marty.:bolt:
     
  2. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    I can not get past your SIG. :frightened:

    Is it too early to start drinking to help the pain ? :icon_shrug:
     
  3. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/wire?section=nfl&id=2632806

    Updated: Oct. 20, 2006, 3:20 AM ET

    Rivers, L.T. rebound from 'Martyball' debacle to lead Chargers

    Associated Press

    National Football League News Wire

    SAN DIEGO -- Marty Schottenheimer was as quick with a quip
    as Philip Rivers is with his release.

    Asked what the San Diego Chargers can do about their running
    game, which hasn't exactly been overpowering, Schottenheimer said:
    "We're just going to keep throwing it."

    And to think, it was just three games ago that the Chargers were
    dragged down by an unfortunate episode of "Martyball," the
    conservative, play-not-to-lose approach that contributed to their
    only loss, at Baltimore.

    Throwing the ball is always OK with Rivers, who has helped lead
    the Chargers to a 4-1 record in his first season as starter.

    Star running back LaDainian Tomlinson has no problem with that,
    either. He knows he's going to get his yards.

    "We're winning. That's the only important thing," said
    Tomlinson, who's always been more concerned with his team's record
    than with his stats.

    Five games into the Rivers era, the Chargers' offense has an
    identity.

    "I just think it's wide-open," said Rivers, ........... CLICK ON THE CHINGUS DOMINGUS FOR MORE
     
  4. exodus

    exodus Well-Known Member

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    "We're winning. That's the only important thing,"

    :yes:
     
  5. nickelbolt

    nickelbolt Fuggedaboutit

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    Dude... I think you've been bitten by the Marsha bug. :gaga: She kinda' grows on you... huh?
    When the feelin' strikes, you just gotta go with it, bro. :lttehghost:

    Maybe I'll post some Naughty Marsha Pics in the adult section. Just for you. :icon_wink:
     
  6. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    OLD pruned up MILF's gone wild ? :puke: :puke: :puke: :puke:
     
  7. Johnny Lightning

    Johnny Lightning Go Bolts

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    Two more days untill we kick the sheet out of the Chiefs...:tup:

    Chargers I Love You...:tup:
     
  8. nickelbolt

    nickelbolt Fuggedaboutit

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    Edwards recalls Martyball days
    By ADAM TEICHER
    The Kansas City Star
    [​IMG]
    When he talks about his coaching mentors, as he will occasionally do without even being asked, Herm Edwards mentions Tony Dungy, Dick Vermeil, even Carl Peterson.

    Rarely, if ever, does Edwards cite Marty Schottenheimer, who gave him his first job as an NFL assistant with the Chiefs in 1992. Edwards coached the defensive backs for Schottenheimer for three seasons.

    Edwards sought to set the record straight this week. But, it should be noted, he did so only after being prodded and because his first game with the Chiefs against Schottenheimer’s San Diego Chargers is Sunday at Arrowhead Stadium.

    “Marty was (a mentor), too,” Edwards said.

    “He had conviction, and that’s the one thing I learned from him right away: If you’re going to be a head coach in this league, there are going to be some storms and some naysayers about how you’re trying to do things, but this is the way I’m going to do it. I’m going to build my program this way and it was his program, no doubt about it. It’s my program, they hired me as the head coach, I’m going to do it this way because this is why they hired me.”

    Be that as it may, Edwards has no bobblehead statue of Schottenheimer, as he does of Dungy and Vermeil, on his office desk at Arrowhead. He departed Schottenheimer’s coaching staff after the 1994 season.

    Edwards returned to the Chiefs’ scouting department — voluntarily because he wanted to get back into personnel, he said — for the 1995 season. He got back into coaching the following year when Dungy took over as head coach in Tampa Bay and brought Edwards with him.

    Schottenheimer said this week that he couldn’t remember details of Edwards’ departure from his coaching staff.

    Publicly, at least, there is mutual admiration.

    “I’ve learned a lot from Marty Schottenheimer, and there’s no doubt about it,” Edwards said. “I was fortunate to be around him and was fortunate the guy hired me. I respect him and think he’s one of the better coaches in the National Football League. His record shows that. Yeah, he lost playoff games. They were saying that when we beat him (with the Jets) in the playoffs. I said, ‘Hey, we were fortunate to beat him,’ and he’s got another good football team now.

    “The thing I learned most from Marty … was that he had his philosophy on how he was going to coach football, how he was going to run practice, the type of players he wanted, and he never let anyone distract him from doing that.”

    Schottenheimer said: “Herman was well-organized. He had the ability to communicate, which is so important. I have great admiration for him. He’s a great teacher. He relates to his players very well. That doesn’t mean he doesn’t get on them or chew them out.

    “I wasn’t real excited when he ended up in Kansas City.”

    Edwards and Schottenheimer matched coaching skills four times when Edwards coached the New York Jets. Edwards won three games, most notably a 20-17 overtime playoff win after the 2004 season.

    In that game, Schottenheimer’s notoriously conservative philosophy was on vivid display in overtime, and it probably cost the Chargers the victory. Instead of trying for the winning touchdown, he ordered the Chargers to set up for a field goal once they got in range.

    His kicker, rookie Nate Kaeding, missed a 40-yard try, extending a game the Jets would go on to win.

    It’s difficult to watch the Chiefs this season and not believe Schottenheimer didn’t have a great influence on Edwards. Their football philosophies are remarkably similar. Both believing in winning with a strong defense and kicking game and an offense that controls the ball and doesn’t turn it over.

    “There’s nothing wrong in playing that way,” Edwards said. “It’s very disciplined football, and you’re going to be physical, you’re going to have a good defense, you can run the ball and you’re not going to beat yourself with penalties.

    “Maybe that was that era where he played, but I kind of played in that era, too. I just think it’s a good way to play, a sound way to play, and it’s the way you like to play because you know at the end you’ve got a tough football team.”

    To reach Adam Teicher, Chiefs reporter for The Star, call (816) 234-4875 or send e-mail to ateicher@kcstar.com
     
  9. WonderSlug

    WonderSlug Well-Known Member

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    Well, I think the KC side will be trying to do HermyBall.

    The run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run component of MartyBall was left for dead in Baltimore from what it seems.
     
  10. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    Good read by nicklebolt.

    Marty - Edwards - Cowher - Parcells etc are clones.

    It is only a matter of time before Marty is just like Cowher in getting the gorilla off of his back.
     
  11. megold0715

    megold0715 Well-Known Member

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    i agree well i hope marty gets the monkey off his back this weekend
     
  12. WonderSlug

    WonderSlug Well-Known Member

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    To many fans, the "monkey" won't be jettisoned into space until he is holding a Lombardi.
     
  13. Johnny Lightning

    Johnny Lightning Go Bolts

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    Marty Schottenheimer was as quick with a quip as Philip Rivers is with his release. Asked what the San Diego Chargers can do about their running game, which hasn't exactly been overpowering, Schottenheimer said: "We're just going to keep throwing it."

    :bolt: :tup:
     
  14. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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  15. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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