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Chili Recipes R Us Bring em!!

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by wrbanwal, Feb 15, 2007.

  1. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    ok,

    this is from memory so fill in the blanks!!!


    coupla lbs - chorizo sausage
    coupla lbls - ground chicken

    cook the sausage until almost done

    add the chicken and cook until chicken is getting white

    mix in Chilie powder & Cumin (2 to 1) (coupla tbls of CP to one tbls of cumin)

    add big o can of chopped tomoatos


    cook up the holy grail of chopped

    onion
    bell pepper
    garlic
    celery

    add to chili

    add enough liquid (water or chicken stock) to your likin

    cook that for awhile - (45min)

    add in big o can of whatever kinda beans you like ( I add a big jar of mixed beans, pinto, navy, red kidney)

    add heat to your liking (crushed red pepper)

    heat & serve with you favorite side

    I went with rice last time

    and

    COLD BEER!!!


    :icon_toast: :icon_toast:
     
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  2. Shamrock

    Shamrock New Member

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  3. in_a_days

    in_a_days dgaf

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    :bolt2:
     
  4. Carrie1219

    Carrie1219 Banned Banned

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    These recipes sound great....BUT......chille with no beans is an absolute no no for me. H8ter would agree.... :icon_rofl:
     
  5. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Texas law...no beans in chili :no: :tdown: :icon_evil:
     
  6. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Thanx Bro!!:tup: :icon_toast:
     
  7. Shamrock

    Shamrock New Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  8. AnteaterCharger

    AnteaterCharger Calibrating Bolttalk, Podcast by Podcast Staff Member Super Moderator Podcaster

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    1lb lamb
    1lb pork
    1lb beef
    all stew meat
    brown them in oil

    1 can of salsa
    1 can of black and red beans (i like them damn it)
    Smidge of tomato paste
    30 tortilla chips
    16 oz BEEER!

    meat's cooked, use beer to scrape up the bits
    add chips, tomato paste, salsa, beans, adobe paste

    mix up, add meat

    cook in over for three hours
     
  9. Carrie1219

    Carrie1219 Banned Banned

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    ANT eats pork... :eek:

    Seriously, sounds like a GREAT recipe... :yes:
     
  10. in_a_days

    in_a_days dgaf

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    Okay... this is my cousins recipe for ground turkey chili... it's freakin' bomb, yo!

    One package Jenni-O lean ground turkey (aprox. 1 lb.)
    One chicken breast, chopped into half inch cubes

    Brown these two items, then drain the grease. Transfer to a good sized pot or, preferrably, a crockpot. Then add:

    One 16oz. can of chicken broth
    One 16oz. can of tomato sauce
    16oz. Pace picante sauce
    Four oz. any beer
    16oz. can diced tomato (optional)
    16oz. can kidney beans (optional)
    16oz. can pinto beans (optional)

    Begin to simmer on a low to med-low heat. Then add:

    One red onion, chopped
    Three anaheim chilies, chopped
    Eight large cloves of fresh garlic, chopped
    One to three minced jalapenos, depending on heat desired (two is
    perfect)

    Season with:

    One and a half tablespoons of chili powder
    One teaspoon cumin
    One teaspoon oregano
    One teaspoon Hershey's baking coco
    A few dashes of tapatio or cholula, or whatever.

    Simmer about 2-3 hours. If it's too thick, add a little more tomato sauce, or tomato juice.

    Enjoy!
     
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  11. Carrie1219

    Carrie1219 Banned Banned

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    in_a_days, that is a nice heart healthy recipe...(for the most part) :tup:
     
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  12. in_a_days

    in_a_days dgaf

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    Yeah I gotta give it up the the cuzz... he's one hell of a cook and everything he makes is very health conscientious. :yes:
     
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  13. Carrie1219

    Carrie1219 Banned Banned

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    IAD... I'm making your cousin's chilli recipe tomorrow.... I'll report back on the finished product... ;)
     
  14. in_a_days

    in_a_days dgaf

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    Nice! What's the occasion?
     
  15. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    I tried Gramps recipe with the chorizo sausage mixture...not too shabby, but I think I still prefer the venison and ground beef mix.
     
  16. Carrie1219

    Carrie1219 Banned Banned

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    I know, these recipes sound pretty good. Had to love the way you and Gramps wrote your recipes. :icon_mrgreen:

    I'm going to go for the heart healthier version of the chilli recipes this weekend. Lean meats, low fat, low salt, where possible....
     
  17. Carrie1219

    Carrie1219 Banned Banned

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    IAD, the chilli recipe is excellent... Very Very spicey...
     
  18. DefenseWins

    DefenseWins New Member

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    Hello Steph!!

    Question - Zest??
    Comment - not enough garlic :lol:

    Sounds absolutely scrumptous btw :drool: Please, add great Italian dishes all you want :tup::yes:
     
  19. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Hello Steph!!

    Barely scrape the skin with a small grater.


    word :yes: :tup:
     
  20. Charger Dave

    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    Hi Carrie - IMO *ALL* Chili is good for the heart as well as the soul! In N/E Oklahoma, Chili is considered "out of season" during the summer - I think that is why the whole family has now moved out of that state, most are hanging out in TX, FL or CA these days where such things are unheard of. ;) Those in Texijuana keep telling me "there are no tomoatoes in real chili" - I don't give a blessed thinkers damn about "real chili", just what makes me happy. :) One thing we all agree on is that it starts with the spice mix.

    Homemade Chili Seasoning Mix


    While I prefer to use Carroll Shelby's original Texas chili mix as the "base" for my chili, (then kick it up a notch based on how ornery I'm feeling at the time), my Aunt Ann always kept a sealed jar of "chili powder mix" on a dark shelf in her kitchen - and you could barely tell the difference in the end result of either one. Having your spices "already mixed" helps to minimize mistakes - especially if you are cooking around a campfire or in an RV/Trailer somewhere.

    In this context - I am talking about pre-mixing selected spices with some kind of chili powder to produce a reasonable mix which can be added to your chili based upon your own taste as you cook it. Naturally, the more of the mixture you add - the more "kick" your pot is going to have, so I recommend just experimenting until you find something that suits you, (which is the fun of making chili to begin with).

    Virtually all such chili spice mixes are based upon some kind of commercial chili powder, cumin and oregano. A good, although basic, "mix" consists of 3 tablespoons of chili powder, 1 tablespoon cumin and 1 tablespoon oregano - which would match about 4 servings of chili without burning anyone. (I would just *have* to add black and cayenne pepper and garlic powder to this - about 1 tablespoon of each).

    Here is a mix that is a bit more "sophisticated":

    10 tablespoons Anaheim or guajillo chile powder
    3 tablespoons ground cumin
    3 tablespoons ground dried oregano
    3 tablespoons garlic powder
    2 tablespoons cayenne chile powder or other hot chile powder, such as chiltepin or Thai
    2 tablespoons pasilla or other mild chile powder, such as ancho

    Here is another Chili Powder Blend that is pretty closet to Aunt Ann's secret mix - highly recommended:

    12 tablespoons mild ground Chile powder (homemade)
    3 tablespoons ground dried oregano
    3 tablespoons ground cumin
    3 tablespoons garlic powder
    2 tablespoons cayenne pepper
    1 tablespoon paprika
    1 tablespoon of black pepper

    Combine all ingredients and mix together well. Store in a tightly sealed glass jar, away from heat and light.

    Here are some other things folks like to throw in their own "chili mix" - although I don't hold with much of this:
    Ground coriander seed, ground celery seed, clove, thyme, rosemary (ugh!), ginger, ground (toasted) teicherry black peppercorns and just about any other spice/herb you can imagine.

    SCRATCH Made Chili Powder:
    If you just "HAVE TO" scratch make your own chili powder (and I don't do this) folks usually use some kind of combination of the following peppers:
    Anaheim (New Mexico Anaheims are said to be the best)
    Ancho
    Chimayo
    Mulato
    Pasilla

    The "purists" boil Anchos - then scrape the meat from the inside of the pepper for further drying/powdering. If you go that far, I don't think we would enjoy one another's company around a campfire if the subject of conversation migrated into doing so. Fanaticism is bad for your health unless it involves mass quantities of beer.

    A more "reasonable" way to handle the above peppers (again if you just have to do this):
    Rinse your chiles with cold water, dry on paper towels or a rack. Place chiles on baking sheet. Bake at 350 degrees for about 2 or 3 minutes, until stiffened, turn frequently. Cool. Remove and discard stems, seeds, inner veins and any dark spots. Place chiles in electric blender, process at high speed until ground. Sieve powder to remove large flakes if desired, (although I wouldn't). Jar and store in a cool, dark place.

    ~~~

    (Note: Some of the stuff above was stolen from folks who write better than I ever will - but have been "tweaked" to my own specifications/pleasures). -=dave=-

    Going to spend next week over at Santee Lakes with the "local" family. You can bet I'll be firing up the old Dutch Ovens out of doors - and the first thing on the menu is Papa's Chili!
     
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  21. DefenseWins

    DefenseWins New Member

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    Hello Steph!!

    For some reason the old movie "Stripes" came to mind when I first saw that :whistling:

    Well darn, why didn't you just say lemon peel (withouth tha nathy pith) :icon_huh: Darn fangled fancy words and gadgets... I just use a fine grater and a soft touch

    Kind of? :unsure:

    "We don't need no stinking mellow garlic":no:

    Fresh is always better!! (as is more in the case of garlic IMO... when I cook some things you can smell the garlic a block away :lol:) It's harder to peel because it isn't all dried out - and the juices are where that great flavor comes from. Same thing holds true for vidalia onions, amongst other things. Garden grown or farmer's market veggies are a must for really good flavor. Speaking of which, when you nab some "homegrown", put it in a ziplock with the air squeezed out and then put it in a sealed jar in a cool, dark place to retain that delicious flavor.
     
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  22. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Hello Steph!!


    Never occurredta me either, Darlin!! :no: :icon_shrug: :icon_huh:
     
  23. DefenseWins

    DefenseWins New Member

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    Hello Steph!!

    :icon_rofl:Must.....bite.....tongue..... mumble, mumble... heavy handed lawyers

    Don't want to turn this thread into an episode of "The Grating Gourmet"...:lol:
     
  24. Charger Dave

    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    Chili Meat!

    I think all of us who have made chili have probably used hamburger if we were in a hurry. That will get you by - but if there is time I like to "plan ahead".

    I prefer to buy packaged stew meat from Albertson's - then hand grind it through our old meat grinder *very* coarse. This adds a chewy consistency to my chili that the family really loves.

    Alternatively, (and especially when I'm going to make a big batch), I'll pick out a few tri-tip steaks and ask the butcher to coarse grind them for me. Any excess gets vacuum sealed and stuck in the freezer for the next batch.

    One of my "chili purist" cousins in Texas hand carves his meat with a sharp knife into little half-inch cubes - but I'm too doggone lazy to mess with that. While he is still cutting I'll already be eating. (When he and his wife came out last winter I didn't get any complaints either). ;)
     
  25. Shamrock

    Shamrock New Member

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    Coarse grinding tri-tip or another "choice" meat is a very good idea. Then you are getting meat that most likely came from a young steer (1 1/2 to 2 years old) versus getting canned meat from an old bull or cow.

    When I sell older cows, they are called "canners" at the auction when bidding - because that's what they become. Canned meat for chili, stews, etc. They will be tougher and have less taste than a younger steer.
     
  26. Charger Dave

    Charger Dave Back to the Alethiometer..

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    Ayup! But gotta do a little more teasing first. (Can you tell I *LOVE* Chili!)? Hint! ALL my chili has to have beer for the liquid.
     

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