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Compensatory Draft Pick System Widens the Gap Between the Good and the Bad

Discussion in 'Chargers Fan Forum' started by wrbanwal, Apr 3, 2010.

  1. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    EDIT: THIS IS A 4 YEAR OLD ARTICLE

    For those who dismiss the value of compensatory picks

    http://www.drafthistory.com/index.php?/weblog/entry/nfl_draft_compensatory_pick_system_screws_the_weakest_teams/

    The NFL Draft is purportedly the great equalizer, designed to assist the weakest teams to rebound and achieve former Commissioner Pete Rozelle's goal of league-wide parity, but the continual awarding of compensatory draft picks to the strongest teams only widens the gap between the best and the worst. The league has awarded 32 compensatory picks for the 2010 NFL Draft spread among 19 teams. Only 6 of the 32 picks went to teams with less than .500 records. No team with a losing record received more than one compensatory pick, while 6 teams with winning records received multiple picks.

    Even worse for the teams with the losing records was that they received compensatory draft picks that were much later than those of the winning teams. Not one of the first 11 compensatory picks went to a team with a losing record. In fact, the combined records of the teams awarded those first 11 compensatory picks was 100-60, .625. Playing .625 ball gets one into the playoffs nearly every time. Overall, teams with compensatory draft picks had a 267-229, .538 record, significantly above average.

    Teams like the Indianapolis Colts (14-2), San Diego Chargers (13-3), Minnesota Vikings (12-4), Philadelphia Eagles (11-5), New England Patriots (10-6), Cincinnati Bengals (10-6), Pittsburgh Steelers (9-7) and Atlanta Falcons (9-7) each received at least one compensatory pick while the likes of the Washington Redskins (4-12), Kansas City Chiefs (4-12), Cleveland Browns (5-11) and Buffalo Bills (6-10) didn't receive any. And even though the St. Louis Rams (1-15), Detroit Lions (2-14) and Tampa Bay Buccaneers (3-13) did receive one compensatory pick each, they ended up getting the last three picks in the draft, which are nearly meaningless. The first team with a losing record to receive a compensatory pick was the Jacksonville Jaguars, who will get 12th compensatory pick of 2010, the 34th choice in the 6th round, the 203rd player overall.

    The New England Patriots (9-7) received 4, count 'em 4, compensatory draft picks in 2010. The Patriots also received 3 compensatory picks in 2009 and 4 compensatory picks in 2007. The Carolina Panthers (8-8) and the Tennessee Titans (8-8) each received three compensatory picks. The Indianapolis Colts (14-2), Philadelphia Eagles (11-5), Cincinnati Bengals (10-6), Atlanta Falcons (9-7) and Pittsburgh Steelers (9-7) each received two compensatory picks. The San Diego Chargers (13-3), Minnesota Vikings (12-4), Green Bay Packers (11-5), San Francisco 49ers (8-8), Jacksonville Jaguars (7-9), Miami Dolphins (7-9), Oakland Raiders (5-11), Tampa Bay Buccaneers (3-13), Seattle Seahawks (5-11), Detroit Lions (2-14) and St. Louis Rams (1-15) each received one compensatory pick.

    Now truth be told, compensatory picks usually do not amount to much. They are only awarded at the end of rounds three through seven and by that time most of the players with real potential are typically long gone. However, while the pickings may be slim, it is very possible to find a real gem with a compensatory pick. Just ask the New England Patriots about their selection of quarterback Tom Brady with the 33rd choice in the sixth round of the 2000 NFL Draft. Also note that Brady, who was the 199th player to be selected that year, would have been gone by the time the first losing team with a compensatory pick in 2010 (the Jaguars) makes its with the 203rd pick. In 2010 there will be 3 compensatory picks at the end of the 3rd round, 1 at the close of the 4th round, 6 at the end of both the 5th and 6th rounds, and 16 more at the conclusion of the draft.

    The league has a rationale for how picks are awarded, but the system is flawed. Compensatory picks are awarded to teams that lost players to free agency. At first blush, that may seem like ample justification for the award and on the surface, there is no reason to argue about the compensatory pick system. The compensatory picks process is the outcome of past labor negotiations between the team's and the players' union. The teams fought hard, as they always have and always will, to keep salaries low. Having lost the legal battle on the concept of free agency, the league has done everything it could to thwart it. Compensatory picks are merely one indirect method of doing so. Despite some exceptions, typical salaries for NFL players are much lower than their baseball and basketball counterparts despite the fact that NFL players are subject to more injuries, many of which are career ending and result in lifelong maladies, and much shorter careers. The award of compensatory picks helps keep salaries down by removing one of the reasons why teams should bid up salaries to keep their own players. In true free agency, a team that lost a player would be completely out of luck. In a system where compensatory draft picks are awarded if a player is lost, wise teams can actually turn the loss of one of their desirable players into a gain, both by reducing the teams overall salary payout and salary cap, but also by obtaining additional picks. For some teams it comes down to a business decision planned well in advance. Just notice how many compensatory picks Bill Belichick and the New England Patriots have amassed over the years.

    But compensatory picks hurt poor teams in another way that often goes under the radar. The addition of each compensatory pick devalues every normal draft pick that comes thereafter. For instance, if you have the worst team in the NFL, you would normally expect to receive the 1st, 33rd, 65th, 97th, 129th, 161st, 193rd picks, that is the first pick in rounds one through seven. But with the inclusion of the compensatory picks awarded in 2010, and taking into account the Washington Redskins' use of a supplemental pick in 2009, the top pick in the later rounds is pushed back as follows: 4th round, the 99th player (rather than the 97th); 5th round, the 132nd (rather than the 129th); 6th round, 170th (versus the 161st); and 7th round, 208th (versus the 193rd). Those differences may be subtle, but teams have given up picks to move up in a draft enough times to demonstrate that such differences have value.

    The purpose that the league adopted the compensatory draft system was not to maintain parity by assisting poor teams. It was done as a method to thwart rising salaries. It does hurt poor teams however by devalueing their picks in the later rounds as well as by helping good teams who lose players to free agency (often by their own choice).

    Bert Bell and even Pete Rozelle would be saddened by the state of the NFL Draft today. While teams still build through the draft, the cards are increasingly stacked against the worst teams. First, the large contracts paid to top draft picks and the salary cap minimized the value of the earliest picks and sometimes crippled the ability of poor teams to improve. Just note how many teams with top choices in recent years would have liked to have traded down but were unable to do so. And then, the trend in recent years for the best teams to be awarded compensatory picks for players they no longer wanted, which gave good teams more picks while devaluing the picks of other teams in later rounds.

    If anything good comes out of the ongoing labor negotiations, hopefully it will restore a semblance of balance to the NFL Draft. Otherwise the notion of 'on any given Sunday' will become a vanishing memory.
     
  2. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    The formula for figuring out Comp picks is kind of vague. They use "net" contractural values of FA's lost and signed.

    This is where it comes to a screeching halt because no one has ever explained how that "net" is assigned to a comp pick.

    I suspect the martini lunch comes into play.
     
  3. paddyirishman

    paddyirishman BoltTalker

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    Shaken not stirred???:icon_toast:
     
  4. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    Money isn't the only supposed factor. There's also number of snaps played.
     
  5. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    They are essentially the same thing.

    Snaps is an escalator clause for cash for the player and sometimes a draft pick for the team.

    That is why they have to wait until the season's end to add up the $$$ damages in escalators achieved just like the Cro deal for next year.
     
  6. DenverBolt67

    DenverBolt67 BoltTalker

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    Compensatory picks
    In addition to the 32 picks in each round, there are a total of 32 picks awarded at the ends of Rounds 3 through 7. These picks, known as "compensatory picks," are awarded to teams that have lost more qualifying free agents than they gained the previous year in free agency. Teams that gain and lose the same number of players but lose higher-valued players than they gain also can be awarded a pick, but only in the seventh round, after the other compensatory picks. Compensatory picks cannot be traded, and the placement of the picks is determined by a proprietary formula based on the player's salary, playing time, and postseason honors with his new team, with salary being the primary factor. So, for example, a team that lost a linebacker who signed for $2.5 million per year in free agency might get a sixth-round compensatory pick, while a team that lost a wide receiver who signed for $5 million per year might receive a fourth-round pick.
    If fewer than 32 such picks are awarded, the remaining picks are awarded in the order in which teams would pick in a hypothetical eighth round of the draft (These are known as "supplemental compensatory selections").
    Compensatory picks are awarded each year at the NFL annual meeting which is held at the end of March; typically, about three or four weeks before the draft.
     
  7. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    http://www.reservationforsix.com/2010/03/2010-nfl-compensatory-picks.html

    Monday, March 22, 2010
    2010 NFL Compensatory Picks

    Adam Schefter of ESPN has revealed the compensatory picks for the 2010 NFL draft

    Round 3

    Cincinnati -- 96
    Tennessee -- 97
    Atlanta -- 98

    Round 4

    Cincinnati -- 131

    Round 5

    Pittsburgh -- 164
    Atlanta -- 165
    Pittsburgh -- 166
    Minnesota -- 167
    San Diego -- 168
    Green Bay -- 169


    Round 6

    Carolina -- 202
    Jacksonville -- 203
    Carolina -- 204
    New England -- 205
    San Francisco -- 206
    Tennessee -- 207

    Round 7

    Indianapolis -- 240
    Tennessee -- 241
    Pittsburgh -- 242
    Philadelphia -- 243
    Philadelphia -- 244
    Seattle -- 245
    Indianapolis -- 246
    New England -- 247
    New England -- 248
    Carolina -- 249
    New England -- 250
    Oakland -- 251
    Miami -- 252
    Tampa Bay -- 253
    St. Louis -- 254
    Detroit -- 255
     
  8. DenverBolt67

    DenverBolt67 BoltTalker

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    Good. That makes up for the 6th we used on Johnson
     

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