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Countdown to Armegedon

Discussion in 'Chargers Fan Forum' started by Concudan, Mar 11, 2011.

  1. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    At 5pm ET, the CBA expires. Today is the day we find out if there's football (if they don't, god forbid, extend the CBA once again).

    We should know at around 2pm I believe.
     
  2. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    NFL labor talks continue in Washington with time running out on CBA

    10:00 a.m.


    WASHINGTON — NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and several influential team owners have arrived at the federal mediator's office on the day the league's labor contract is set to expire.

    The NFL and the players' union are scheduled to hold a 16th day of mediated negotiations Friday. The collective bargaining agreement originally was scheduled to run out last week, but the deadline was extended twice.

    While another extension is possible, the sides remain far apart on how to divide $9 billion in annual revenues. Their contentious public rhetoric Thursday night made it sound as if the NFL could be heading to its first work stoppage since 1987.

    Nine of the 10 members of the owners' labor committee again joined Goodell at the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. On Thursday, the union complained that none of the owners met with any of the players on hand.

    "Everyone knows where the calendar is," lead NFL negotiator Jeff Pash said Thursday night. "Everyone knows what's potentially on the table tomorrow."

    If talks break off it could lead to a lockout by owners or decertification by the union, followed by antitrust lawsuits by players — actions that could threaten the 2011 season.

    "Things can come together quickly," Pash said. "Things can fall apart quickly,"

    Even though there were small-group talks between NFL and union representatives Thursday, no one gave any indication that there was movement on the key issues. Indeed, the loudest words came in the evening, sparked by comments from Pash.

    "I've said it many times: If both sides have an equal commitment to getting this deal done, it will get done," he said. "I don't know if both sides have an equal commitment. ... Obviously, we have the commitment."

    When that was relayed to NFL Players Association spokesman George Atallah, he responded with an e-mail to The Associated Press that said: "Jeff Pash was part of an executive team that sold the networks a $4 billion ticket to a game they knew wouldn't be played. The only thing they've been committed to is a lockout."

    That is a reference to a court ruling last week, when the federal judge overseeing NFL labor matters sided with players in their case accusing owners of improperly negotiating TV deals to prepare for a work stoppage.

    NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith then went back to the mediator's office to respond to Pash's statement himself.

    "We have been committed to this process. But for anyone to stand and turn to the American people and say they question that?" Smith said. "Look, I understand that there's probably some things Jeff Pash just has to say, but this is the truth: We know that as early as March of 2009 ... the National Football League engaged in a strategy to get $4 billion of television money ... even if the games weren't played."

    Joining in, NFL spokesman Greg Aiello tweeted: "When is union going to respond to our 150 pages of draft CBA provisions that they received eight days ago. Waiting."

    Smith also tweeted that he would inform the players where things stand at 2 p.m. EST Friday, saying "Players stay strong! Stay informed."

    The NFL hasn't lost games to a work stoppage since 1987, when a strike shortened the season and some games included nonunion replacement players. The foundation of the current CBA was reached in 1993 by then-Commissioner Paul Tagliabue and union chief Gene Upshaw. It has been extended five times as annual revenues soared above $9 billion, the league expanded to 32 teams, and new stadiums were built.

    The 2006 contract extension was the final major act for Tagliabue, who then retired, succeeded by Goodell. An opt-out clause for each side was included in that deal, and the owners exercised it in May 2008 — three months before Upshaw died. Smith replaced Upshaw in March 2009.

    Two months later, Smith wrote Goodell a letter, asking for detailed financial statements from each of the 32 teams and the league as a whole. The NFL offered to turn over other economic data this week, and the NFLPA rejected that proposal, saying the investment bank advising the union determined the information would be "utterly meaningless" during the negotiations.

    The NFL, meanwhile, said the union was offered unprecedented financial data, including some the league doesn't share with clubs.

    Pash indicated there hadn't been movement on that issue Thursday.

    The dispute centers on money: how to divide the billions in revenues, how much of that should go to owners off the top to cover certain costs, and the union's demand for what it calls "financial transparency."

    Under the old CBA, owners received an immediate $1 billion to go toward operating expenses before splitting remaining revenues with players. Owners initially tried to add another $1 billion to that, and while they have lowered the up-front figure they want — at least down to an additional $800 million — Smith said it is still too much.

    The labor committee members present Thursday were Jerry Richardson of the Panthers, Pat Bowlen of the Broncos, Jerry Jones of the Cowboys, John Mara of the Giants, Art Rooney II of the Steelers, Clark Hunt of the Chiefs, Mark Murphy of the Packers, Dean Spanos of the Chargers and Mike Brown of the Bengals. Eagles president Joe Banner and Redskins general manager Bruce Allen also were there.

    While Mara, Hunt and Murphy occasionally participated in the talks since mediation began Feb. 18, a group this large attended only one previous session, last week.

    The only missing member of the key league group was Patriots owner Robert Kraft, part of a delegation visiting Israel with Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick. Asked Thursday whether he expects next season to start on time, Kraft said: "That's my belief."

    There have been various issues discussed during negotiations, including the owners' push to increase the regular season from 16 games to 18; a rookie wage scale; and benefits for retired players.

    But the rift is mainly about revenues.

    And the acrimony — temporarily tamped down at federal mediator George Cohen's insistence when he began overseeing talks Feb. 18 — was out there for everyone to see Thursday night.

    "We're going to be back here (Friday)," Smith said, "because we want football to continue."
     
  3. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Deadline day for NFL, union: CBA set to expire Friday; tone of talk sours

    WASHINGTON - Back on the brink.

    The NFL and the players' union headed into the final 24 hours of their twice-extended collective bargaining agreement with little apparent progress on key economic issues. And a public series of back-and-forth barbs made it sound as if the league is close to its first work stoppage in nearly a quarter of a century.

    "Everyone knows where the calendar is," lead NFL negotiator Jeff Pash said Thursday night. "Everyone knows what's potentially on the table tomorrow."

    The league's labor contract originally was to expire last week. The sides agreed to push that deadline to Friday; if a deal isn't reached, there could be another extension.

    What certainly appeared more likely, given Thursday's tone, was that talks could break off, leading to a lockout by owners or decertification by the union, followed by antitrust lawsuits by players — actions that could threaten the 2011 season.

    "Things can come together quickly," Pash said after the sides spent a 15th day in mediation. "Things can fall apart quickly,"

    Nine of the 10 members of the owners' labor committee joined NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell at the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service — but, the union complained, none of the owners met with any of the players on hand.

    Even though there were small-group talks between NFL and union representatives Thursday, no one gave any indication that there was movement on the key issues. Indeed, the loudest words came in the evening, sparked by comments from Pash.

    "I've said it many times: If both sides have an equal commitment to getting this deal done, it will get done," he said. "I don't know if both sides have an equal commitment. ... Obviously, we have the commitment."

    When that was relayed to NFL Players Association spokesman George Atallah, he responded with an e-mail to The Associated Press that said: "Jeff Pash was part of an executive team that sold the networks a $4 billion ticket to a game they knew wouldn't be played. The only thing they've been committed to is a lockout."

    That is a reference to a court ruling last week, when the federal judge overseeing NFL labor matters sided with players in their case accusing owners of improperly negotiating TV deals to prepare for a work stoppage.

    NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith then went back to the mediator's office to respond to Pash's statement himself.

    "We have been committed to this process. But for anyone to stand and turn to the American people and say they question that?" Smith said. "Look, I understand that there's probably some things Jeff Pash just has to say, but this is the truth: We know that as early as March of 2009 ... the National Football League engaged in a strategy to get $4 billion of television money ... even if the games weren't played."

    Joining in, NFL spokesman Greg Aiello tweeted: "When is union going to respond to our 150 pages of draft CBA provisions that they received eight days ago. Waiting."

    Smith also tweeted that he would inform the players where things stand at 2 p.m. EST Friday, saying "Players stay strong! Stay informed."

    The NFL hasn't lost games to a work stoppage since 1987, when a strike shortened the season and some games included nonunion replacement players. The foundation of the current CBA was reached in 1993 by then-Commissioner Paul Tagliabue and union chief Gene Upshaw. It has been extended five times as annual revenues soared above $9 billion, the league expanded to 32 teams, and new stadiums were built.

    The 2006 contract extension was the final major act for Tagliabue, who then retired, succeeded by Goodell. An opt-out clause for each side was included in that deal, and the owners exercised it in May 2008 — three months before Upshaw died. Smith replaced Upshaw in March 2009.

    Two months later, Smith wrote Goodell a letter, asking for detailed financial statements from each of the 32 teams and the league as a whole. The NFL offered to turn over other economic data this week, and the NFLPA rejected that proposal, saying the investment bank advising the union determined the information would be "utterly meaningless" during the negotiations.

    The NFL, meanwhile, said the union was offered unprecedented financial data, including some the league doesn't share with clubs.

    Pash indicated there hadn't been movement on that issue Thursday.

    The dispute centers on money: how to divide the billions in revenues, how much of that should go to owners off the top to cover certain costs, and the union's demand for what it calls "financial transparency."

    Under the old CBA, owners received an immediate $1 billion to go toward operating expenses before splitting remaining revenues with players. Owners initially tried to add another $1 billion to that, and while they have lowered the up-front figure they want — at least down to an additional $800 million — Smith said it is still too much.

    The labor committee members present Thursday were Jerry Richardson of the Panthers, Pat Bowlen of the Broncos, Jerry Jones of the Cowboys, John Mara of the Giants, Art Rooney II of the Steelers, Clark Hunt of the Chiefs, Mark Murphy of the Packers, Dean Spanos of the Chargers and Mike Brown of the Bengals. Eagles president Joe Banner and Redskins general manager Bruce Allen also were there.

    While Mara, Hunt and Murphy occasionally participated in the talks since mediation began Feb. 18, a group this large attended only one previous session, last week.

    The only missing member of the key league group was Patriots owner Robert Kraft, part of a delegation visiting Israel with Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick. Asked Thursday whether he expects next season to start on time, Kraft said: "That's my belief."

    There have been various issues discussed during negotiations, including the owners' push to increase the regular season from 16 games to 18; a rookie wage scale; and benefits for retired players.

    But the rift is mainly about revenues.

    And the acrimony — temporarily tamped down at federal mediator George Cohen's insistence when he began overseeing talks Feb. 18 — was out there for everyone to see Thursday night.

    "We're going to be back here (Friday)," Smith said, "because we want football to continue."

    WASHINGTON - Back on the brink.

    The NFL and the players' union headed into the final 24 hours of their twice-extended collective bargaining agreement with little apparent progress on key economic issues. And a public series of back-and-forth barbs made it sound as if the league is close to its first work stoppage in nearly a quarter of a century.

    "Everyone knows where the calendar is," lead NFL negotiator Jeff Pash said Thursday night. "Everyone knows what's potentially on the table tomorrow."

    The league's labor contract originally was to expire last week. The sides agreed to push that deadline to Friday; if a deal isn't reached, there could be another extension.

    What certainly appeared more likely, given Thursday's tone, was that talks could break off, leading to a lockout by owners or decertification by the union, followed by antitrust lawsuits by players — actions that could threaten the 2011 season.

    "Things can come together quickly," Pash said after the sides spent a 15th day in mediation. "Things can fall apart quickly,"

    Nine of the 10 members of the owners' labor committee joined NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell at the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service — but, the union complained, none of the owners met with any of the players on hand.

    Even though there were small-group talks between NFL and union representatives Thursday, no one gave any indication that there was movement on the key issues. Indeed, the loudest words came in the evening, sparked by comments from Pash.

    "I've said it many times: If both sides have an equal commitment to getting this deal done, it will get done," he said. "I don't know if both sides have an equal commitment. ... Obviously, we have the commitment."

    When that was relayed to NFL Players Association spokesman George Atallah, he responded with an e-mail to The Associated Press that said: "Jeff Pash was part of an executive team that sold the networks a $4 billion ticket to a game they knew wouldn't be played. The only thing they've been committed to is a lockout."

    That is a reference to a court ruling last week, when the federal judge overseeing NFL labor matters sided with players in their case accusing owners of improperly negotiating TV deals to prepare for a work stoppage.

    NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith then went back to the mediator's office to respond to Pash's statement himself.

    "We have been committed to this process. But for anyone to stand and turn to the American people and say they question that?" Smith said. "Look, I understand that there's probably some things Jeff Pash just has to say, but this is the truth: We know that as early as March of 2009 ... the National Football League engaged in a strategy to get $4 billion of television money ... even if the games weren't played."

    Joining in, NFL spokesman Greg Aiello tweeted: "When is union going to respond to our 150 pages of draft CBA provisions that they received eight days ago. Waiting."

    Smith also tweeted that he would inform the players where things stand at 2 p.m. EST Friday, saying "Players stay strong! Stay informed."

    The NFL hasn't lost games to a work stoppage since 1987, when a strike shortened the season and some games included nonunion replacement players. The foundation of the current CBA was reached in 1993 by then-Commissioner Paul Tagliabue and union chief Gene Upshaw. It has been extended five times as annual revenues soared above $9 billion, the league expanded to 32 teams, and new stadiums were built.

    The 2006 contract extension was the final major act for Tagliabue, who then retired, succeeded by Goodell. An opt-out clause for each side was included in that deal, and the owners exercised it in May 2008 — three months before Upshaw died. Smith replaced Upshaw in March 2009.

    Two months later, Smith wrote Goodell a letter, asking for detailed financial statements from each of the 32 teams and the league as a whole. The NFL offered to turn over other economic data this week, and the NFLPA rejected that proposal, saying the investment bank advising the union determined the information would be "utterly meaningless" during the negotiations.

    The NFL, meanwhile, said the union was offered unprecedented financial data, including some the league doesn't share with clubs.

    Pash indicated there hadn't been movement on that issue Thursday.

    The dispute centers on money: how to divide the billions in revenues, how much of that should go to owners off the top to cover certain costs, and the union's demand for what it calls "financial transparency."

    Under the old CBA, owners received an immediate $1 billion to go toward operating expenses before splitting remaining revenues with players. Owners initially tried to add another $1 billion to that, and while they have lowered the up-front figure they want — at least down to an additional $800 million — Smith said it is still too much.

    The labor committee members present Thursday were Jerry Richardson of the Panthers, Pat Bowlen of the Broncos, Jerry Jones of the Cowboys, John Mara of the Giants, Art Rooney II of the Steelers, Clark Hunt of the Chiefs, Mark Murphy of the Packers, Dean Spanos of the Chargers and Mike Brown of the Bengals. Eagles president Joe Banner and Redskins general manager Bruce Allen also were there.

    While Mara, Hunt and Murphy occasionally participated in the talks since mediation began Feb. 18, a group this large attended only one previous session, last week.

    The only missing member of the key league group was Patriots owner Robert Kraft, part of a delegation visiting Israel with Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick. Asked Thursday whether he expects next season to start on time, Kraft said: "That's my belief."

    There have been various issues discussed during negotiations, including the owners' push to increase the regular season from 16 games to 18; a rookie wage scale; and benefits for retired players.

    But the rift is mainly about revenues.

    And the acrimony — temporarily tamped down at federal mediator George Cohen's insistence when he began overseeing talks Feb. 18 — was out there for everyone to see Thursday night.

    "We're going to be back here (Friday)," Smith said, "because we want football to continue."
     
  4. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    NFL, players' union trade barbs, raise tensions before CBA deadline


    WASHINGTON -- You can't say the collective bargaining talks between the NFL's owners and players broke down on Thursday, because there were no discussions between the primary parties.

    Although their respective attorneys and some players met, the owners did not sit down with the players or union officials.

    "We were told we were going to be meeting with the owners at 4 o'clock," said George Atallah, the union's assistant executive director of external affairs. "It is now 6:15, and we just received word that the owners broke for dinner without any formal bargaining or negotiating sessions today between players and owners. We're disappointed. We were -- as we have been for the last two years -- prepared to negotiate. Instead, we were stuck here waiting. This is a $9 billion business. The players shouldn't have to be treated like this, and the fans shouldn't be kept waiting, either."

    The league's collective bargaining agreement is set to expire Friday at 11:59 p.m. EST. There was hope the sides would lock themselves behind closed doors in hopes of bridging an $800 million annual gap in how revenues should be allocated between the owners and players, yet there was no movement despite all but one owner on the league's labor committee being in attendance.

    TROTTER: NFLPA says 18-game proposal off the table

    "It's up to (federal mediator) George Cohen as to when the sides meet," said Greg Aiello, NFL senior vice president of public affairs. "He goes back and forth between the groups. When he thinks there's a reason to bring the sides together, he does so. We have to follow Mr. Cohen's lead. There were meetings with the union today. Our people were in the building from 9:30 a.m. ... If Mr. Cohen calls and says get back here tonight, we'll be there."

    Cohen's decision not to bring the owners into the mix could be perceived as ominous for negotiations, which were extended twice last week. If the sides do not come to a deal before Friday afternoon, the players' association is expected to decertify its union and sue the league for antitrust violations -- if the owners lock out the players, as expected.

    As if the day was not strange enough, verbal and Twitter sparring matches broke out after the sun went down. It started with NFL executive vice president of labor/league counsel Jeff Pash telling the media: "If both sides have an equal commitment to getting this deal done, it will get done. I don't know if both sides have an equal commitment."

    Union executive director DeMaurice Smith, who was headed home, heard the comments and had his driver detour back to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service building, where the media were camped out. He wanted to reiterate the players' commitment to getting a deal done.

    Smith also released a document obtained from the discovery process in the union's court case to block the league's access to $4 billion in television revenue during a lockout in 2011.

    "(The document) talks about how they were going to go about securing television money for 'cash during a lockout,'" Smith said. "So with all due respect, when someone wants to stand up and say that he questions or doubts one party's commitment to the negotiation process, all I would ask is for all of you, everybody who has an obligation to the people who love this game and the players who dig this game, stick to the facts. ... We're going to be back here tomorrow because we want football to continue."

    Later on, Atallah and Aiello faced off on Twitter.

    Atallah: "I would like to request an expense credit from the owners on the last 3 hours of my life."

    After that, during a session with the media, Atallah continued: "If owners continue to question players' commitment to negotiations, we're prepared to make public all our unanswered proposals."

    That comment was tweeted by a reporter, prompting Aiello to respond: "That won't take long."

    Aiello added: "While George is at it, ask him when is the union going to respond to our 150 pages of draft CBA provisions that they received eight days ago. Waiting."

    Negotiations resume Friday, at which time the owners are expected to put an 18-game schedule on the table. Smith said Wednesday night during a fan event that the union will not sign off on an expanded regular season. He reiterated that later in the evening to SI.com, saying "It's something that our players don't want. Eighteen games is not in the best interest of our players' safety, so we're not doing it."



    Read more: NFLPA questions NFL's desire to negotiate before extension deadline - NFL - SI.com
     
  5. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    NFL: the Looming Lockout and What It Means To the Fans

    As we approach the new extended deadline for the NFL and NFL Players Association (NFLPA) to agree on a new collective bargaining agreement (CBA) I fall under the pessimistic side of things and believe that nothing will happen and the lock-out will begin.

    Like what happened with the Major League Baseball strike in the 90's and the NHL lock-out a few years ago people have begun questioning whether or not the fans will come back to the sport immediately after the lock-out ends.

    I think there is no doubt that the ratings for the first NFL game of the the 2011 season will have it's usual high ratings, and I will be amongst those watching, because I will be a fan long after the current players retire and given the age of some owners I'll be a fan long after they've past their teams on.

    However, one thing I will not do for the 2011 season (and possibly beyond) is directly give any of my money to the NFL or NFLPA.

    That means I will not attend any NFL games, buy any new gear, or even (gasp) buy the new Madden video game.

    Sure my revenue dollars alone aren't going to hurt the NFL and I'm not going to be one to try and start some sort of anti-NFL merchandise movement.

    I'll simply find new avenues to spend my money.

    Now that Clinton Portis and Santana Moss have been released by the Washington Redskins I'd normally think about getting a new jersey or two, maybe Chris Cooley or Brian Orakpo. However, with this looming lock-out I might take those jersey dollars over to the Capitals or Nationals.

    The point being, like many of you I work my butt off every week to provide for my family.

    I know football is a dangerous game, but it's also very profitable. So the fact that millionaires and billionaires are bickering over how to spend our money just rubs me the wrong way.

    So after the lock-out is over I will be eagerly awaiting the first Redskins' game of the season, but this year and maybe years to come I won't directly spend money on my beloved Redskins.
     
  6. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    So are they plucking the golden goose?
     
  7. HEXEDBOLT

    HEXEDBOLT Don't like it, lump it!!!

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    Fawk em both, let them eat cake.
     
  8. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    More and more people are saying that they expect the Uunion to decertify today, plunging the offseason into the courts.
     
  9. Carlsbad_Bolt_Fan

    Carlsbad_Bolt_Fan Well-Known Member

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    I'm at the point where I just don't give a phuck anymore. Last night's tit-for-tat exchange between each side says to me that none of them care.
     
  10. DenverBolt67

    DenverBolt67 BoltTalker

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    Sounds like it is the only way they will get the owners to open their books and/or lower their expectations
     
  11. HollywoodLeo

    HollywoodLeo Well-Known Member

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    I thought this thread was about the pending Tsunamis at first.
     
  12. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    AdamSchefter
    We'll see if anything changes, it always could, but De Smith told players during his conference call the plan is to decertify.
    about 1 hour ago via web
     
  13. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    richeisen
    RT @MikeSilver: A good source just told me that management's offer "split the difference." The union hasn't countered
     
  14. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Report: Union planning to decertify — 3:07 p.m.

    NFL Players Association executive director DeMaurice Smith told players during a 2:00 p.m. ET conference call that the union plans to decertify later today, according to ESPN.

    Player sources told FOXSports.com that after last week’s decision to extend collective bargaining agreement discussions another seven days, the vibe the players received from their union representatives was that there would be no more extensions. The feeling was that the NFL would have to show the NFLPA the financial transparency it was seeking within the seven-day extension.

    Various reports stated that the NFL made one last ditch proposal during Friday’s CBA discussions. — Adam Caplan
     
  15. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    nancygay
    If NFLPA chooses to decertify as a union, the labor battle moves to the courtroom. Protracted, ugly, but football could go on.
     
  16. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    AdamSchefter
    Owners and NFLPA meeting now -- the last gasp to try to make something happen.
    2 minutes ago via web
     
  17. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    nancygay
    NFL Network reporting the NFLPA will dissolve via decertification at the deadline. Now the players, owners head to court.
     
  18. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    nancygay
    NOW NFL Network says the NFLPA has taken its finger off the decertify button. What the hell??!!
    less than a minute ago via Echofon
     
  19. Nomad

    Nomad Very Senior Member

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    If these yahoos can't come up with an agreement, I'll find something else to do. There is a lot of other things to do. It will be a lot cheaper this year anyway, they get no more money from me. :mad:
     
  20. in_a_days

    in_a_days dgaf

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    NFL Players Association opts to decertify

    The NFLPA released a statement shortly after 5 p.m. ET saying:
     
  21. Brundlefly

    Brundlefly Well-Known Member

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    So what does that mean?
     
  22. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    Apparently it means the sky is falling & the earth will be devoured by flame.

    I'm sure that wikileaks has a good definition for armegeddon.
     
  23. AnteaterCharger

    AnteaterCharger Calibrating Bolttalk, Podcast by Podcast Staff Member Super Moderator Podcaster

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    So instead of continuing to negotiate the players decide to run to court. The owners were at least offering to negotiate and lower their demands, the players basically seemed to say **** you. And frankly I'm pissed at both of them.
     
  24. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    Sounds pretty typical of your capitalistic, corporate-loving stance, Ant.

    Remember - I'm the guy who you told to both me & his tie-dye-wearing wife how much you despise "hippies".

    Run to the man - that's all you know. Comfort zone & all that.

    I hope the NFL dies a ****** death & we all have to find something more beneficial to do with our lives.
     
  25. Carlsbad_Bolt_Fan

    Carlsbad_Bolt_Fan Well-Known Member

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    DeMaurice Smith just spoke and what he said was chilling. Not going to rehash everything he said. But the implication was that the sides are no closer than they were before mediation started. I truly believe there will be no football this season.
     
  26. DenverBolt67

    DenverBolt67 BoltTalker

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    The mediator himself said the negotiations were going no where. There are 3 sides, and the players and owners are only telling 2 of those sides. The truth is somewhere in the middle
     
  27. DenverBolt67

    DenverBolt67 BoltTalker

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    And until the owners open their books, they won't get any closer. De-certification just speed up the process of forcing the owners to prove why they need the players to give up another billion dollars a year. I am not against the owner getting it, bu I also don't blame the players for wanting justification as why it is needed, especially if it is true that during these meetings the owners stated that every team in the league is profitable.
     
  28. Kwak

    Kwak ....

    Joined:
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    Little bitches crying over how to split 9 Billion dollars. They are all full of ****. Fuk em.

    This crap and the possibility of the chargers moving out of town. If the chargers move, I will be turning in my bolts for a cheese head. I root for GB now anyway with the wife being a diehard fan from Wisconsin.


    Wake me up if they start playing football again.


    PS. Tie-dye rocks!
     
  29. Pointyearedog

    Pointyearedog I only put idiots on ignore...

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    Isn't it Armageddon?
     
  30. AnteaterCharger

    AnteaterCharger Calibrating Bolttalk, Podcast by Podcast Staff Member Super Moderator Podcaster

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    How many employees get to see their employer's books? Just saying. The players want to keep what they got which is more then the owners, that doesn't make much sense
     

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