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Doctors: Junior Seau's brain had CTE

Discussion in 'Chargers Fan Forum' started by SDRaiderH8er, Jan 10, 2013.

  1. SDRaiderH8er

    SDRaiderH8er Well-Known Member

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    http://espn.go.com/espn/otl/story/_...brain-damage-found-other-nfl-football-players

    SAN DIEGO -- Junior Seau, who committed suicide last May, two years after retiring as one of the premier linebackers in NFL history, suffered from the type of chronic brain damage that also has been found in dozens of deceased former players, five brain specialists consulted by the National Institutes of Health concluded.
    Seau's ex-wife, Gina, and his oldest son Tyler, 23, told ABC News and ESPN in an exclusive interview they were informed last week that Seau's brain had tested positive for Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, a neurodegenerative disease that can lead to dementia, memory and depression.
    "I think it's important for everyone to know that Junior did indeed suffer from CTE," Gina Seau said. "It's important that we take steps to help these players. We certainly don't want to see anything like this happen again to any of our athletes."
    She said the family was told that Seau's disease resulted from "a lot of head-to-head collisions over the course of 20 years of playing in the NFL. And that it gradually, you know, developed the deterioration of his brain and his ability to think logically."
    CTE is a progressive disease associated with repeated head trauma. Although long known to occur in boxers, it was not discovered in football players until 2005. Researchers at Boston University recently confirmed 50 cases of CTE in former football players, including 33 who played in the NFL.
    Seau shot himself in the heart May 2. His death stunned not only the football world but also his hometown, San Diego, where he played the first 13 years of his 20-year career. Seau led the Chargers to their first and only Super Bowl appearance and became a beloved figure in the community
    Within hours of Seau's death, Tyler Seau said he received calls from researchers hoping to secure his father's brain for study. The family ultimately chose the National Institutes of Health in Washington, D.C., to oversee the research.
    Gina Seau said the family chose the NIH because it was a "complete, comprehensive, unbiased scientific institution of the highest level."
    Dr. Russell Lonser, the former chief of surgical neurology at the NIH, helped coordinate the study. In an interview, Dr. Lonser, who was recently named chairman of the department of neurological surgery at Ohio State University, said that because of the publicity surrounding the case, the study of Seau's brain was "blinded" to ensure its independence.
    Three independent neuropathologists from outside the NIH were given unidentified tissue from three different brains; one belonged to Seau, another to a person who had suffered from Alzheimer's Disease, and a third from a person with no history of traumatic brain injury or neurodegenerative disease
    Dr. Lonser said the three experts independently arrived at the same conclusion as two other government researchers: that Seau's brain showed definitive signs of CTE. Those signs included the presence of an abnormal protein called "tau" that forms neurofibrillary tangles, effectively strangling brain cells.
    A statement released by the NIH said the tangles were found "within multiple regions of Mr. Seau's brain." In addition, the statement said, a small region of the left frontal lobe showed "evidence of scarring that is consistent with a small, old traumatic brain injury."
    Dr. Lonser declined to name the neuropathologists who examined Seau's brain.
    In addition to his previous role at NIH and, now, at Ohio State, Dr. Lonser serves as chairman of the NFL's research subcommittee, part of the league's Head, Neck & Spine Committee, which helps set policy related to concussions. The NFL in September made a $30 million unrestricted donation to the NIH. Dr. Lonser said the league "was not involved in anything regarding how this brain was handled or managed at any step of the process, to be absolutely crystal clear about that."
    "The NFL had no influence whatsoever," he said.
    The study of CTE and football is still in its infancy. The prevalence of the disease has not been established. It cannot be diagnosed in living people, only by examining brains that are removed during autopsy.
    More than 4,000 former players are suing the NFL in the federal court, alleging the league ignored and denied the link between football and brain damage, even after CTE was discovered in former players. The Seau family said it has not yet decided whether to join the lawsuits.
    Over the past five years, under pressure from Congress, dissenting researchers and, more recently, the lawsuits, the NFL disbanded a controversial committee on concussions that was established in 1994 under former Commissioner Paul Tagliabue. The league made several rule changes and overhauled its policies to focus on head trauma and long-term cognitive problems.
    Asked if she believed the NFL was slow to address the issue, Gina Seau said: "Too slow for us, yeah."
    Tyler, whose mother was Junior Seau's high school sweetheart, and Gina both described dramatic changes they noticed in Seau during the final years of his life, including mood swings, depression, forgetfulness, insomnia and detachment.
    "He would sometimes lose his temper," Tyler said. "He would get irritable over very small things. And he would take it out on not just myself but also other people that he was close to. And I didn't understand why."
    Seau, who also played for Miami and New England, was never listed by his teams as having had a concussion.
    Gina was married to Seau for 11 years and had three children with him. They divorced in 2002, but she said they remained close friends until his death. Seau sent a group text to his four children and Gina the night before he took his life.
    "I love you," he wrote.
    "The difference with Junior ... from an emotional standpoint (was) how detached he became emotionally," Gina said. "It was so obvious to me because early, many, many years ago, he used to be such a phenomenal communicator. If there was a problem in any relationship, whether it was between us or a relationship with one of his coaches or teammates or somewhere in the business world, he would sit down and talk about it
    Gina recalled that Seau frequently said, "Let's sit down and break bread and figure this out." She added, "He didn't run from conflict."
    Tyler, Gina and her two oldest children, 19-year-old Sydney and 17-year-old Jake, all said they found some solace in the CTE diagnosis because it helped explain some of Seau's uncharacteristic behavior.
    Still, it also left them conflicted that a sport so much a part of their lives had altered him so terribly.
    "It definitely hurts a little bit because football was part of our lives, our childhood, for such a long time," said Sydney, a freshman at USC. "And to hear that his passion for the sport inflicted and impacted our lives, it does hurt. And I wish it didn't, because we loved it just as much as he did. And to see that this was the final outcome is really bittersweet and really sad."
    Jake, a high school junior who quit football to focus on lacrosse, added: "He lived for those games, Sunday and Monday nights, you know? And to find out that that's possibly what could've killed him or caused his death is really hard."
    Tyler said he was holding tightly to his memories of getting up at 5 in the morning to lift weights with his father before heading to the beach for a workout and surfing. And while the diagnosis helps, he said, it can't compensate for his loss.
    "I guess it makes it more real," he said. "It makes me realize that he wasn't invincible, because I always thought of him as being that guy. Like a lot of sons do when they look up to their dad. You know? You try to be like that man in your life. You try to mimic the things that he does. Play the game the way he did. Work the way he did. And, you know, now you look at it in a little bit different view."
    Tyler added: "Is it worth it? I'm not sure. But it's not worth it for me to not have a dad. So to me it's not worth it."
     
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  2. Lightning's Girl

    Lightning's Girl Mod Chick =) Staff Member Moderator

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    God rest Junior Seau. I am so glad his family donated his brain to be studied so that there is at least some explanation for his sudden, untimely, and tragic end.

    From a medical standpoint, I can see how CTE develops in people who've had multiple concussions. The brain fits pretty snugly into its compartment after both fontanels (those soft areas on a baby's head) close at around two years of age, so there's really no place for it to go when it crashes into the skull as a result of trauma. I would imagine that a bruise forms on the brain during a concussion, much as they do when any other body part suffers an insult, and if you have several more such incidents over the course of your life......well, there's going to be some permanent damage.

    Sadly, we don't know about these things until it's already too late to repair the brain. This will be the unfortunate case in too many retired football players, and I expect we'll hear many more sad tales of dementia, violent behaviors, and suicides in the years to come. But if I were the superintendent of schools where contact sports are played, I'd insist that every kid who sustains ANY sort of head injury be taken out of the game immediately and not allowed to play until cleared by a doctor (not the team's trainer!). The same rules should apply to college sports and the NFL, too---if a 300-pound linebacker mistakes your cranium for a bowling ball, you ride the bench until an MD who DOESN'T work for your team says your brain has healed enough for you to play.

    Of course, that would mean making choices that would cost team owners big money, and I think we all know that's not going to happen. :tdown:
     
  3. HEXEDBOLT

    HEXEDBOLT Don't like it, lump it!!!

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    I wonder about guys like Dick Butkus who played during a more violent time in the NFL with less protection and seem to come through alright. Today's players, who have access to illicit enhancement drugs to hide or overcome injury may actually be bringing this on themselves. The money alone is enough motivation but to be a star and even to have women that would throw themselves at these guys and all the other trimmings of being a hometown hero has to raise questions.
     
  4. SDRaiderH8er

    SDRaiderH8er Well-Known Member

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    I am sure CTE affects everyone differently. I wonder how the players Union ties this in with their lawsuit.
     
  5. Lance19

    Lance19 BoltTalker

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    I think this discussion is difficult for many fans who absolutely love football...and certainly do not
    want to believe that it is inherently unhealthy...that anyone who plays is likely to sustain brain damage.
    I sure don't.

    When you brought up Butkus, the first possible explanation that went through my mind was that he
    played 8 or 9 seasons...Junior played parts of 20!

    Also, while there were a lot less safety rules in Butkus' day, the guys he was colliding with,
    overall, were smaller and slower.

    Bottom line: We love ya Junior...and hope the game can go on, without inevitable serious
    long-term damage to those that make it great.
     
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  6. SDRaiderH8er

    SDRaiderH8er Well-Known Member

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    There have been several players to commit suicide just in the last couple of years. And who knows how many before then. It may be difficult to talk about, but its becoming more and more a part of the game. What happens to the game if OSHA has their way.
     
  7. HEXEDBOLT

    HEXEDBOLT Don't like it, lump it!!!

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    My whole point is that it seems more NFL players are dying younger either by their own hand or from the direct use of performance enhancing drugs. I think the Stillers first SB team has lost many of those players at early ages. Regardless of bigger faster or what have you, a thirty mph impact is still the same whether you're 5'8" or 6'4" protection is the only difference to defuse impact. Today's medical procedures with the use of new and advanced medications and drugs the players get on their own may have implications is all I'm saying.
     
  8. Pointyearedog

    Pointyearedog I love the smell of football in the morning.

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    It's still a sad chapter just the same... Everyone is clamoring for an answer and a way to slow down or prevent it, but no one seems to be in a hurry to supply that breakthrough piece of equipment. Maybe the bookies have their hands in Nike's, Riddell's, Russell's, etc. pockets, or maybe the manufacturers of these life-saving items want more money before they release the product...
     
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