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Draft picks

Discussion in 'Chargers Fan Forum' started by Trumpet_Man, Jul 6, 2006.

  1. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    I just saw that the Bears have signed ALL their draft picks early. Now slotted values can be more readily calculated but signing everybody this early seems a bit premature or is it we are just not use to seeing this as fans ?
     
  2. WonderSlug

    WonderSlug Well-Known Member

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    Could be the latter.

    This opens the way for all our picks to sign next week. Hopefully. :icon_mrgreen:
     
  3. LT teh ghost

    LT teh ghost Well-Known Member

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    well sense they didn't have a first round guy to deal with, i am sure it was easier to sign them.
     
  4. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    I think it is a good thing to sign as early as possible, make resigning veterans, and dealing with injuries a much surer thing, IMO.
     
  5. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    From a business perspective, I would think the owners would have agreements in principal at least and then sign at the last possible moment prior to camp. This makes the most sense to me versus signing everybody early.
     
  6. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Why? To build interest on thier money. If they want to win, and get arses in the seats, then they show the fans they are working to build the team and limit distractions. IMHO.
     
  7. sdchrger

    sdchrger Well-Known Member

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    Except for the fact that subsequent signings could muck up the whole deal.

    Let's say I'm the 15th pick and I agree "in principle" to a 5 year deal with 10 mil in guaranteed money. Then 4 days before camp the 16th pick signs a similar contract except that they get 11 mil in guaranteed money. You don't think that handshake agreement just went down the drain?
     
  8. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    Yes.

    From a purely money standpoint why pay early ?

    So long as we have no distractions going into camp, everything should be good to go.
     
  9. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    This very same scenario could happen by signing early as well.
     
  10. sdchrger

    sdchrger Well-Known Member

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    Maybe but not nearly as likely. To hold out on a contract that's 3 weeks old is never a solid decision. Once your name goes on the dotted line it's a whole different ballgame.
     
  11. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Its not like they pay the bonuses or full ammount at once. Its broken down into payments, so its a minimal loss if anything.
     
  12. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    Lavar Arrington comes to mind on how a guy was relatively underpaid, then did not see the field much - was traded/cut. How does this affect the teams morale ? Was the guy a cancer because he did not get his jack?

    Most guys would say this is my deal and play but not everyone. Donnie Edwards is another case where the mouth affects the players around him.
     
  13. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    Agents push for that signing bonus which is paid now.

    2nd round picks will get around one million dollars for a signing bonus alone (not prorated or amortized). We are talking at least one million in signing bonus' alone since the Bears did not have a first round pick.
     
  14. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Which is still trivial in the amounts NFL teams deal with, I would think.
     
  15. sdchrger

    sdchrger Well-Known Member

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    I got you. You're saying down the road. Jevon Walker was another example. I agree with that. Getting players on the cheap can be a team buster.

    I thought you meant in regards to showing up to camp as a rookie.
     
  16. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    If you were writing the checks, the business aspect of making money with your money slaps the checkbooks sensibilities and the person writing the checks.

    Ahhh no biggie. All sorts of signings will be happening in the next two to three weeks. Camp opens July 28th.
     
  17. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    Bears | Contract update: D. Manning
    Thu, 6 Jul 2006 05:37:07 -0700
    Bob LeGere, of the Daily Herald, reports Chicago Bears rookie CB Danieal Manning's four-year contract is worth $3.4 million and includes a signing bonus of $1.7 million.


    Bears | Contract update: D. Dvoracek
    Thu, 6 Jul 2006 05:41:31 -0700
    Bob LeGere, of the Daily Herald, reports Chicago Bears rookie DT Dusty Dvoracek's four-year contract is worth $2.86 million and includes a signing bonus of $1.25 million.
     
  18. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    SECOND-ROUND DEALS GETTING MORE COMPLICATED

    Driven by the reality that the NFLPA negotiated only a five-percent increase in the rookie salary pool but at the same time obtained a $45,000 increase in the minimum rookie salaries, players drafted in round two are making up for the reduced first-year cap number via devices typically reserved to players drafted in round one.

    Specifically, a league source tells us that the contracts signed by both of the Chicago Bears' second-round draft picks include a significant one-time payment for achieving minimum playing time thresholds. In 2005, only two second-round picks had one-time NLTBE incentives based on playing time, and both were worth less than $100,000 each. Danieal Manning's contract has a $555,000 one-time NLTBE tied to minimum playing time, and Devin Hester's deal has a $101,500 one-time NLTBE tied to minimum playing time.

    It's a way to push more money into the deals without consuming too much of the first-year rookie pool allocation. And the rookie pool crunch is a very real phenomenon; as more and more contracts are being negotiated, more and more agents are grumbling about the NFLPA's failure to secure a higher increase in the rookie pool -- or at a minimum to apply the five-percent bump above the $45,000 increase in the new rookie base salary.

    Per the source, Manning's deal breaks down as follows: $820,000 signing bonus, $125,000 2006 roster bonus, $420,000 option bonus fully guaranteed by future salaries, and minimum base salaries for 2007, 2008, and 209.

    As to the $555,000 one-time NTLBE, it will be earned if he participates in 35 percent of the defensive snaps in 2006 or 45 percent in 2007, 2008, or 2009. But the $555,000 payment is also guaranteed by future base salaries, if he doesn't reach the minimum.

    Though Manning's guaranteed pay of $2.195 million (which includes the first-year base salary) exceeds by 4.9 percent the guaranteed money paid to Cowboys linebacker Kevin Burnett, the player taken in the same slot a year ago, the bonus money of $1.365 million pales in comparison to Burnett's $1.8625 million in bonus money.

    The difference comes from the $45,000 increase in salary and the $555,000 one-time NLTBE based on minimum playing time, which adds another $600,000 to the package.
     
  19. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    HESTER'S CONTRACT NUMBERS

    A league source tells us that the contract paid to Bears receiver Devin Hester breaks down as follows: zero signing bonus; $255,000 roster bonus; $907,500 option bonus (guaranteed by future salaries); $101,100 one-time NLTBE (guaranteed by future salaries or paid as workout bonuses in 2008 and 2009); and salaries of $275,000, $360,000, $445,000, and $530,000.

    Total actual value? $2.8736 million. And the increase in guaranteed money over the player drafted in the same slot in 2005 is 6.48 percent.

    "Not sure why anyone would not see this as a good deal for Hester," said a league source in response to recent criticism of Hester's contract. "There is a big squeeze this year on the rookie pool causing many second-rounders to have to agree to accept one time NLTBE bonuses which are conditioned on play-time. Since Hester is primarily a specials teams player, he may never achieve the minimum play-time percentage and therefore he may not earn the NLTBE, so [Eugene] Parker was smart in going early to secure the best pool number possible under the circumstances, getting the most guaranteed money possible with a very small amount tied to an NLTBE performance bonus. But he also protected [the NLTBE bonus] by inserting a clause that says if the player does not earn this bonus in the first two years, then that amount will convert to workout bonuses in the last two years, avoiding the risk that he might not earn it."
     
  20. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    I did not want to start a new thread so here:

    http://www.philly.com/mld/dailynews/sports/14975305.htm

    For Upshaw, running union a labor of love

    By PAUL DOMOWITCH
    pdomo@aol.com

    WITH THE CLOCK ticking on his final days as NFL commissioner, Paul Tagliabue flew to Dusseldorf, Germany, in late May to take in the NFL Europe championship game between Amsterdam and Frankfurt. Sitting next to him on the 8-hour flight was a frequent traveling companion, NFL Players Association executive director Gene Upshaw.

    "This was going to be his last one, so I wanted to go with him," Upshaw says during a recent interview with the Daily News at the union's Washington, D.C., headquarters.

    NFL Europe still is in business today mainly because of Tagliabue and Upshaw. It's a money loser that most of the league's owners have long wanted to euthanize. But together, the commissioner and the union chief managed to convince them that it provides benefits to the NFL that can't be measured strictly in dollars and cents.

    "It's the only other place you can play football when you're not playing here," Upshaw says. "It's the only place you can train officials. It's the only place you can send coaches and players [to get experience]. It's the only place you can have players that might want to be TV analysts get some experience.

    "It gives you a chance to develop your talent both on and off the field. We look at it from the broad perspective, not just how much money you're going to make from it."

    That kind of thinking illustrates why Upshaw's tenure, in the minds of most, has been so successful since he took over in 1983. And he's more than happy to confront those who criticize him, wondering aloud whether the source of their discontent is tinged with racism.

    It's rare for a union boss and a company CEO to be on the same page about anything. The relationship between Upshaw and Tagliabue is unlike any you'll see in labor, in or out of professional sports. They are good friends who consider each other partners in a $6 billion-a-year business rather than fist-shaking, table-pounding adversaries.

    Many hard-core labor types think Upshaw's relationship with Tagliabue is unseemly. They think it's impossible to represent your rank and file competently if you're close buds with management. They view Upshaw as a puppet and his union as the weakest in professional sports, even though the league's salary cap has nearly tripled in the last 12 years and the NFL's average annual salary has skyrocketed from $120,000 to $1.4 million in the more than 2 decades the Hall of Fame offensive lineman has run it.

    "Paul and I have had discussions about how people perceive us," Upshaw says. "We have a relationship where we can just sit down and talk. Without even talking about business. We can talk about the history [of the game]. About what he's been through, what I've been through. All of those things are why we've had success...

    "Probably the most important thing Paul has done is kept us out of the courtroom. He knew and I knew that if we stayed out of the courtroom and used the assets, which is the players, we could grow the game in a way that is unbelievable. And that's what's happened."

    The courtroom is where the NFL was in 1989 when Tagliabue succeeded Pete Rozelle as commissioner. The league and union were embroiled in a bloody 6-year legal battle over free agency. Before that were bitter strikes in 1982 and '87.

    Shortly after Tagliabue took over, Upshaw made the boldest move of his career, one that ultimately would change the face of the NFL. After a federal appeals court ruled that antitrust laws could not apply to the league because the NFLPA was a labor union, he decertified his union. With the NFLPA no longer a collective bargaining unit, the league was stripped of its antitrust protection, which ultimately led to a 1993 settlement that gave the players true free agency, along with a salary cap.

    Since then, the players and owners have lived in relative peace and harmony, which has helped the league prosper and make lots and lots of money for both sides.

    "When Paul took over, one of the first things he did was call me and said, 'Let's get together for dinner.' We met at a little [Washington D.C.] restaurant up on Columbia Road. From that point on, that's been the difference.

    "We have agreed on a lot of things and we have disagreed on a lot of things. But it's nobody else's business. It doesn't advance his cause or my cause to have the Washington Post or the New York Times or the Philadelphia Daily News making a headline out of it, when the real issue is how do we solve the problem, rather than become the problem.

    "It's never been about either one of us trying to one-up the other. It's always been, what can we do to make our product better and grow it. If people don't understand that, that's their problem, not ours."

    Upshaw said his close relationship with Tagliabue is the main reason the owners and players got a new labor extension done in March. Upshaw and the union went into the negotiations wanting two things: a change in the salary-cap formula to factor in previously unshared revenue such as luxury-box income, concessions, parking and local sponsorship agreements, and a revenue-sharing agreement by the owners to assist teams not making as much money as others.

    The owners eventually agreed to the change in the cap formula. But the revenue-sharing plan was another matter. The league's higher-revenue teams, including the Eagles, weren't eager to turn over some of their hard-earned money to other clubs. They also didn't understand why this was any of Upshaw's business in the first place. As long as his players were getting their cut of the league's total revenues, why on earth did he care if there was a growing gap between the league's rich and not as rich.

    "Gene made it clear he didn't want a deal without enhanced revenue-sharing," said Harold Henderson, the league's executive vice president of labor relations since 1991. "We said over and over to him, 'It's not your issue. Why are you so hung up on that?' Some of the owners to the bitter end were still saying, 'I don't understand why he cares.' "

    Upshaw cared, because he felt the NFL slowly but surely was heading down the same path of disparity as major league baseball, in which you have teams like the Florida Marlins with a $14.9 million payroll and teams like the Yankees spending about $200 million on players. That kind of out-of-whack situation apparently doesn't bother baseball's union people. But it bothers Upshaw.

    "It doesn't do any good to have half the teams doing well and half the teams not doing well," Upshaw said. "The more closely you get to the baseball model, the harder it is to fix, because as the revenues get bigger and bigger and bigger, nobody wants to fix it.

    "The argument [the owners] kept making was it's none of our business. That the union shouldn't be worried about revenue-sharing. That it's an internal matter for the owners. Well, it is. Except we have a salary cap in our league. When you have a salary cap, it changes all that. It's not just their business, it's our business, too."

    With the March deadline for a labor extension looming, the owners were inclined to call Upshaw's bluff. But Tagliabue convinced the owners that Upshaw was very serious. On March 8, less than a half-hour before the deadline, the owners emerged from 2 days of meetings at a Dallas hotel with a revenue-sharing plan. The vote was 30-2.

    "I'm telling you, if Paul and I didn't have the kind of relationship we have, we wouldn't have an extension right now," says Upshaw, who was on a plane to Hawaii for the NFLPA's annual convention when the deal passed. "I can tell you that with absolute certainty. Because I had walked away. I was done [negotiating]. Paul knew that. He had to convince his group that I was serious about it, and he did."

    The CBA extension, which runs through the 2011 season, guarantees the players 59.5 percent of the league's total football revenue over the next 4 years and 60 percent in the final 2 years of the deal. And the revenue-sharing plan will allow teams with older stadiums to remain competitive.

    "We have another 10 stadiums we still need to build," says Upshaw, whose union is the only one in professional sports that has invested money in the construction of new venues. "Until we can get that done, those teams aren't going to grow. Minnesota, Oakland, San Francisco, San Diego... that group at the bottom [of the revenue scale] are all in old stadiums. I've been around long enough to remember when they opened all those stadiums, and we thought they were great. Now, they're a piece of crap and need to be replaced."...............
     

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