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Drugs in the NFL

Discussion in 'Chargers Fan Forum' started by Trumpet_Man, Aug 30, 2006.

  1. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    http://www.profootballtalk.com/rumormill.htm

    POSTED 9:24 a.m. EDT; UPDATED 10:46 a.m. EDT, August 30, 2006

    UPSHAW CLAIMS THERE'S NO NEED FOR MORE TESTING

    In response to a fresh wave of attention being paid to the still-prevalent issue of steroids in pro football, the executive director of the NFL Players Association says that no additional testing is needed.

    "Our testing is sufficient and we did not discuss increasing the number of tests in our [CBA] extension," Upshaw told the New York Daily News. "We have been very aggressive in our program and have always done what is best to protect our players' health. Our current program is working and there is no need to increase testing."

    As to recent reports that six members of the 2003 Carolina Panthers took steroids and human growth hormone, Upshaw said, "One of the Carolina players was in the program. I will not discuss which one."

    Upshaw's apparent intent was to suggest that, since one of the players had tested positive for steroids, then the testing program must be working. "If you cheat in the NFL and use performance-enhancing drugs," Upshaw says, "you will get caught.'"

    But what about the other five guys?

    And, frankly, it appears that Upshaw's contention might be incorrect. Given the terms of the steroid policy, the first positive test results in a four-game suspension. If none of the six Carolina players had ever been suspended for four games, then none of them had ever tested positive for steroids, and thus none of them were ever "in the program." Indeed, an Internet search of each of the six players' names plus the word "suspend" produced no evidence that any of them ever were forced to sit out any NFL games.

    The other intriguing aspect of Upshaw's claim is that, by disclosing that one of six men was in the program, he necessarily has violated the confidentiality of the policy. Though the policy doesn't specify the potential penalties for union employees in this regard, an NFL team or team employee who does so becomes subject to a fine of up to $500,000.

    The biggest problem, as we see it, is the issue of human growth hormone and the failure of the NFL to test for it. We've previously heard that plenty of NFL players are using HGH and will continue to do so until there's a reasonable chance of getting busted.

    The NFL and the NFLPA have indicated that there are no plans to adopt the testing protocol for HGH currently utilized by the Olympics, which entails blood analysis. The league and the union contend that the test used by the Olympics is not reliable.

    But if it's good enough for the Olympics, how is it not good enough for the NFL? Moreover, it's hard for us not to consider whether the claims of unreliability are merely a pretext for reluctance by the union to subject its players to far more invasive sample collection procedures and an unwillingness by the league to make the financial concessions necessary to secure the ability to do so.

    So to clarify Upshaw's statement: If you cheat, you will be caught. Unless you cheat by using HGH.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/story/447944p-377122c.html

    Upshaw: No need to
    beef up 'roid tests


    BY GARY MYERS
    DAILY NEWS SPORTS WRITER

    Gene Upshaw, the executive director of the NFL Players Association, while claiming steroids cheaters in the NFL will get caught, revealed last night that one of the players in the Panthers steroids scandal was in the NFL drug program.
    A league source denied a report the NFL was prepared to approach the union to increase steroid testing. Upshaw, saying he had not heard from the NFL, told the Daily News in an E-mail last night that more testing wasn't necessary.

    His statement comes despite reports of steroid and human growth hormone use by five members of the 2003 Panthers Super Bowl team. None of the players was reported to have tested positive for steroids. The NFL and other leagues don't test for HGH. "One of the Carolina players was in the program. I will not discuss which one," Upshaw said. "However, if they were using something that could not be tested for, that is another story."


    CLICK ON LINK FOR REST OF STORY .......
     
  2. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    Nick Hardwick and Floyd "bulked up" and it makes one wonder .... :icon_huh:

    The Chargers have to know something is up and rewarded Nick with a new contract and Nick was arguably a marginal Center.....

    So the moral of the story seems to be if you use HGH - which helps the team create frankensteins monsters, you will be rewarded accordingly.

    It is a beautiful thing........:bolt:
     
  3. Electric Chair

    Electric Chair Well-Known Member

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    These cats like Upshaw are fattening up their wallets based on the freak show that is NFL. Of course they don't want anymore testing (or potential scandals like baseball that turn people off).
     
  4. WonderSlug

    WonderSlug Well-Known Member

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    If anything the NFL urine tests for steroids are more easily fooled and "worked around" than the Olympics ones that use blood draws.
     
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  5. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    PFT.com

    PRESSURE MOUNTS ON NFL TO TACKLE HGH

    A leading steroids opponent questioned on Thursday the National Football League's inexplicable "don't ask, don't test" approach to the question of whether and to what extent players are using human growth hormone, or HGH.

    The NFL doesn't test for HGH, supposedly because the league believes that current tests used by the Olympics aren't reliable. (We think the issue also presents a delicate question of labor relations, since the existing method requires blood to be drawn.)

    Said Dr. Gary Wadler, following an appearance before a U.S. House of Representatives committee that is attempting to eradicate steroids from all sports: "It seems to me if you are sending a message you are not going to test, what you are really saying is you can, in essence, use [HGH] with impunity. Why Major League Baseball and the [NFL] have taken such a strong position on [not testing for HGH] is unclear to me. The Dr. Shortt case just underscores that we cannot be so dismissive of the issue of human growth hormone."

    The "Dr. Shortt case" is, of course, the situation that unfolded three years ago in Carolina, where six members of the team were using all sorts of prohibited substances, including HGH. The public reaction to that case has been the equivalent of a half-hearted shoulder shrug.

    At the same event, the NFL's counsel on labor relations, Adolpho Birch, said that the league and the NFLPA have established a pool in the amount of $500,000 in order to "concentrate our resources on a simpler and more effective [HGH] test." (By "simpler" test, we think that Birch is referring to a urine test, which would be a far easier sell at the bargaining table than blood tests.)

    But Dr. Wadler isn't impressed with the $500,000 commitment. "We're talking in the millions of dollars, not the hundred of thousands. It's an exquisitely complicated subject."

    Frankly, we're not impressed, either. We believe that most football fans are inclined to turn a deaf eye (or is it blind ear?) to the problem because they want nothing to tarnish in any way their enjoyment of pro football. But something needs to be done before the NFL has its Jose Canseco moment, when a recently retired player with moderate-to-high name recognition writes a book that blows the whistle on the problem, and then all hell breaks loose.

    So with the billions in revenue that the NFL and the NFLPA are generating, we think that it would be very wise to spend a lot more than $500,000 on the issue.

    Bottom line -- if you don't take good care of the goose that lays the golden eggs, the goose might eventually stop laying them. When considering the damage that the exposure of rampant chemical cheating has done to baseball, it's shocking to us that the NFL isn't doing everything in its power to avoid a similar fate.
     
  6. Thunderstruck

    Thunderstruck BoltTalker

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    I do think that the human-rights part of it shouldn't just be ignored. I mean, would you like it if your employer could just come up to you at random and say "you need to pee in this cup. We don't have any reason to think you're doing anything wrong, but we just want to make sure."

    There's only so far that a private entity can go in protecting its own image before it crosses a line into outright invasion of privacy.

    And because of that, there will always be ways around the rules...
     
  7. boltssbbound

    boltssbbound Well-Known Member

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    I think that's a different issue from performance enhancing drugs in professional athletics. I agree that it's not really any of your employer's business if you smoke weed on occasion, as long as it does not effect your work. Bud blood testing for steroids and HGH is something that's long overdue.

    As for Trump's wild accusations, everyone that bulks up is not using performance enhancing drugs. With the right nutrionist and fitness trainer helping you, it's more than possible to pack on many pounds of muscle in a short period of time.
     
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  8. boltssbbound

    boltssbbound Well-Known Member

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    Word:nana_rasta: :icon_party: :thumbup: :icon_beerbang:

    In fact, drug and alcohol abuse is more prevalent in the Bolttalk icons than it is in the NFL.

    :icon_banana:
     
  9. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Don't the places where y'all work have randon drug screening??:icon_shrug: :icon_huh:
     
  10. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    Fuc sakes dude what part of "if you are not cheating you are not trying" is hard to understand ? :icon_huh:
     

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