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Flying and landing on A WING and A PRAYER-

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by BFISA, May 15, 2007.

  1. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    A student became lost during a solo cross-country flight. While attempting to locate the aircraft on radar, ATC asked, "What was your last known position?"
    Student: "When I was number one for takeoff."



    A DC-10 had come in a little hot and thus had an exceedingly long roll out after touching down.
    San Jose Tower Noted: "American 751, make a hard right turn at the end of the runway, if you are able. If you are not able, take the Guadeloupe exit off Highway 101, make a right at the lights and return to the airport."
     
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  2. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    A Pan Am 727 flight, waiting for start clearance in Munich, overheard the following:
    Lufthansa (in German): "Ground, what is our start clearance time?"
    Ground (in English): "If you want an answer you must speak in English."
    Lufthansa (in English): "I am a German, flying a German airplane, in Germany . Why must I speak English?"
    Unknown voice from another plane (in a beautiful British accent): "Because you lost the bloody war!"
     
  3. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Tower: "Eastern 702, cleared for takeoff, contact Departure on frequency 124.7"
    Eastern 702: "Tower, Eastern 702 switching to Departure. By the way, after we lifted off we saw some kind of dead animal on the far end of the runway."
    Tower: "Continental 635, cleared for takeoff behind Eastern 702, contact Departure on frequency 124.7. Did you copy that report from Eastern 702?"
    Continental 635: "Continental 635, cleared for takeoff, roger; and yes, we copied Eastern... we've already notified our caterers."
     
  4. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    One day the pilot of a Cherokee 180 was told by the tower to hold short of the active runway while a DC-8 landed. The DC-8 landed, rolled out, turned around, and taxied back past the Cherokee. Some quick-witted comedian in the DC-8 crew got on the radio and said,

    "What a cute little plane. Did you make it all by yourself?"
    The Cherokee pilot, not about to let the insult go by, came back with a real zinger: "I made it out of DC-8 parts. Another landing like yours and I'll have enough parts for another one."
     
  5. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    While taxiing at London's Gatewick Airport , the crew of a US Air flight departing for Ft. Lauderdale made a wrong turn and came nose to nose with a United 727.
    An irate female ground controller lashed out at the US Air crew, screaming: "US Air 2771, where the hell are you going? I told you to turn right onto Charlie taxiway! You turned right on Delta! Stop right there. I know it's difficult for you to tell the difference between C and D, but get it right!"
    Continuing her rage to the embarrassed crew, she was now shouting hysterically: "God! Now you've screwed everything up! It'll take forever to sort this out! You stay right there and don't move till I tell you to! You can expect progressive taxi instructions in about half an hour, and I want you to go exactly where I tell you, when I tell you, and how I tell you! You got that, US Air 2771?"
    "Yes, ma'am," the humbled crew responded.
    Naturally, the ground control communications frequency fell terribly silent after the verbal bashing of US Air 2771. Nobody wanted to chance engaging the irate ground controller in her current state of mind. Tension in every cockpit out around Gatewick was definitely running high. Just then an unknown pilot broke the silence and keyed his microphone, asking:
    "Wasn't I married to you once?"
     
  6. SDRaiderH8er

    SDRaiderH8er Well-Known Member

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    We did this plane a few Years ago. It was for the Navy's Test Pilot School

    [​IMG]

    BEFORE



    [​IMG]

    AFTER

    Once we fly the Jets, and get them flight ready, we slap a new paint job on them and send them home.
     
  7. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Nice paint job!! :yes: :tup: :abq1:
     
  8. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  9. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  10. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    The world's smallest twin-engine airplane has a wingspan of 16 feet, weighs 158 pounds (without pilot), runs on two 15 horsepower engines, cruises at 120 mph, has a range of 310 miles and can do aerobatics.

    http://www.wxpnews.com/4B1T0R/070530-Airplane
     
  11. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  12. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    6/15/2007 - U.S. AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Colo. (AFPN) -- Legendary fighter pilot, retired Brig. Gen. Robin Olds, died June 14 from congestive heart failure one month short of his 85th birthday.

    General Olds, rated a triple ace for having shot down a total of 16 enemy aircraft during World War II and the Vietnam War, served his country in assignments to England, Germany, Libya, Thailand and the United States, in positions of squadron, base, group and wing commander, and assignments to Headquarters U.S. Air Force and the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

    Full story at : http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123057370
     
  13. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  14. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  15. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    C-130 landing onna carrier??

    <object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/CfwJJD5jGXk"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/CfwJJD5jGXk" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="350"></embed></object>
     
  16. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    The German air controllers at Frankfurt Airport are renowned as a short-tempered lot. They not only expect one to know one's gate parking location, but how to get there without any assistance from them. So it was with some amusement that we (a Pan Am 747) listened to the following exchange between Frankfurt ground control and a British Airways 747, call sign Speedbird 206 .

    Speedbird 206: " Frankfurt, Speedbird 206 clear of active runway."

    Ground: "Speedbird 206. Taxi to gate Alpha One-Seven."

    The 747 pulled onto the main taxiway and slowed to a stop.

    Ground: "Speedbird, do you not know where you are going?"

    Speedbird 206: "Stand by, Ground, I'm looking up our gate location now."

    Ground (with quite arrogant impatience):

    "Speedbird 206, have you not been to Frankfurt before?"

    Speedbird 206 (coolly): "Yes, twice in 1944, but it was dark-- and I didn't land."
     
  17. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    A DC-10 had come in a little hot and thus had an exceedingly long roll out after touching down.

    San Jose Tower Noted: "American 751, make a hard right turn at the end of the runway, if you are able. If you are not able, take the Guadeloupe exit off Highway 101, make a right at the lights and return to the airport."
     
  18. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Tower: "Delta 351, you have traffic at 10 o'clock, 6 miles!"


    Delta 351: "Give us another hint! We have digital watches!"
     
  19. BoltsFanUK

    BoltsFanUK Well-Known Member

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    :icon_rofl: :icon_rofl:
     
  20. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    damn,

    not surprising,

    but damn!!
     
  21. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    I'm more surprised at the take-off, cuz frankly, I didn't land in too manya those C-130's.
     
  22. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Columbian drug plane shot down-

    <object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/gHDZqUa0m1s"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/gHDZqUa0m1s" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="350"></embed></object>
     
  23. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    An Air America Tribute-

    Finally, Public Honors for a Long-Secret Victory
    By Steve Vogel Thursday, July 19, 2007; Page T2

    On Jan. 12, 1968, as helicopter pilot Ted Moore watched in amazement, a formation of North Vietnamese air force AN-2 Colt biplanes attacked a secret U.S. Air Force radar base on a mountaintop in Laos.

    Two Russian-built biplanes dropped mortars, fired rockets and strafed the field with machine-gun fire, seeking to destroy a critical outpost in the U.S. air war against North Vietnam.

    To Moore, who was in the air flying an Air America Bell helicopter -- a civilian version of the UH-1 Huey -- the scene was reminiscent of a different time and place. "It really did look like World War I," Moore, 68, recently recalled. "It was a Red Baron type of attack."

    The remarkable aerial fight that ensued has been memorialized in a new painting by artist Keith Woodcock. Next week, Moore and other veterans of Air America will attend the work's unveiling in the new Intelligence Art Gallery at CIA headquarters in Langley.

    Moore was an Army helicopter pilot who had been recruited to fly for Air America, a CIA-owned and -operated proprietary that supported intelligence agents and military personnel in Asia for more than 30 years during the Cold War.

    Site 85, a secret radar station 15 miles from the North Vietnamese border atop one of the highest mountains in Laos, gave American bombers the ability to attack in all weather, a critical capability during the Rolling Thunder bombing campaign. Moore and his flight mechanic, Glenn Woods, were on a mission delivering artillery ammunition in the area when they spotted the drab-green biplanes attacking the base. Moore radioed a warning to agents on the ground, but the attack killed several Hmong guerrillas defending the base.

    Moore's helicopter was supposed to be unarmed, but Woods had packed a piece of contraband -- an AK-47. "When Glenn told me he had an AK-47 with him, I decided we'd make chase," Moore recalled.

    Moore said he never had a chance to ask Woods why he was carrying the assault rifle, though it was not a huge surprise. "If you go down and don't have a weapon, you're toast," Moore said. "Some of the crew chiefs packed heavy."

    The Colts -- versatile, Russian-built biplanes first flown in 1947 -- were faster than the helicopter, Moore said, but he gained on the planes when they flew low and then tried to climb in the mountainous terrain.

    "I closed on them and made a dive," Moore recalled. "I knew I had one chance to get them, and if I missed, I was a goner."

    Woods fired the AK-47 from the door of the Huey. One of the planes immediately crashed and burned, while a second plane, also hit, flew on for several miles, then crashed into a ridge.

    Moore and Woods thus had shot down fixed-wing aircraft from a helicopter -- "a singular aerial victory in the entire history of the Vietnam war," according to historian Timothy N. Castle, author of "One Day Too Long: Top Secret Site 85 and the Bombing of North Vietnam."

    Moore was hauled before superiors and interrogated, but after initial consternation his actions were commended.
    "I was a little out of line in what I did," he recalled.


    When Woods made it back to his home in Thailand, his wife, Sawang Reed, knew something had happened. "He was happy about something, but he'd say, 'Honey, I can't talk about it,' " she recalled.

    Two months after the aerial battle, Site 85 was destroyed and 12 U.S. Air Force personnel were killed during a raid by North Vietnamese commandos.

    Woods died the following year in a helicopter crash, leaving behind his wife and infant daughter. Reed, who remarried and now lives in California, has recently reunited with members of the Woods family and will attend the July 27 unveiling with her daughter.

    "The painting depicts a singular aerial victory in the Vietnam War and will soon be on display as a lasting and inspiring reminder of the heroism and courage of the employees of Air America," said George Little, a CIA spokesman.

    Some 86 Air America personnel were killed in action, beginning with flights over China, Korea and Dien Bien Phu, Vietnam, and continuing through the Vietnam War, according to William Merrigan, 72, a McLean resident who served as legal counsel for Air America from 1962 to 1975.

    "A lot of them were killed down there, and they deserve recognition that they really haven't received," said Merrigan, now a Department of the Army attorney working in Alexandria. Former employees are seeking civil service benefits, but courts have ruled they were not federal employees. Efforts to get Congress to change their status have failed.

    Moore said the unveiling of the painting will be a step toward acknowledging the contributions of Air America veterans. "There's some recognition that we did exist, a recognition that these guys were in combat," Moore said.
     
  24. super_deluxe

    super_deluxe World Class

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    HEY!!!

    That was my plane!! :icon_evil:

    :lol: :icon_tease:
     
  25. sdbound

    sdbound New Member

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    Great thread, thanks.
     
  26. Shamrock

    Shamrock New Member

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    This was floating around as email about a year ago .... my step-Dad (a private pilot) sent it to me ...

    ~~~~~~~~

    There were a lot of things we couldn't do in an SR-71, but we were the fastest guys on the block and loved reminding our fellow aviators of this fact. People often asked us if, because of this fact, it was fun to fly the jet. Fun would not be the first word I would use to describe flying this plane. Intense, maybe. Even cerebral. But there was one day in our Sled experience when we would have to say that it was pure fun to be the fastest guys out there, at least for a moment.

    It occurred when Walt and I were flying our final training sortie. We needed 100 hours in the jet to complete our training and attain Mission Ready status. Somewhere over Colorado we had passed the century mark. We had made the turn in Arizona and the jet was performing flawlessly. My gauges were wired in the front seat and we were starting to feel pretty good about ourselves, not only because we would soon be flying real missions but because we had gained a great deal of confidence in the plane in the past ten months. Ripping across the barren deserts 80,000 feet below us, I could already see the coast of California from the Arizona border. I was, finally, after many humbling months of simulators and study, ahead of the jet.

    I was beginning to feel a bit sorry for Walter in the back seat. There he was, with no really good view of the incredible sights before us, tasked with monitoring four different radios. This was good practice for him for when we began flying real missions, when a priority transmission from headquarters could be vital. It had been difficult, too, for me to relinquish control of the radios, as during my entire flying career I had controlled my own transmissions. But it was part of the division of duties in this plane and I had adjusted to it. I still insisted on talking on the radio while we were on the ground, however. Walt was so good at many things, but he couldn't match my expertise at sounding smooth on the radios, a skill that had been honed sharply with years in fighter squadrons where the slightest radio miscue was grounds for beheading. He understood that and allowed me that luxury. Just to get a sense of what Walt had to contend with, I pulled the radio toggle switches and monitored the frequencies along with him. The predominant radio chatter was from Los Angeles Center, far below us, controlling daily traffic in their sector. While they had us on their scope (albeit briefly), we were in uncontrolled airspace and normally would not talk to them unless we needed to descend into their airspace.

    We listened as the shaky voice of a lone Cessna pilot asked Center for a readout of his ground speed.

    Center replied: "November Charlie 175, I'm showing you at ninety knots on the ground."

    Now the thing to understand about Center controllers, was that whether they were talking to a rookie pilot in a Cessna, or to Air Force One, they always spoke in the exact same, calm, deep, professional, tone that made one feel important. I referred to it as the "HoustonCenterVoice." I have always felt that after years of seeing documentaries on this country's space program and listening to the calm and distinct voice of the HoustonCenterControllers, that all other controllers since then wanted to sound like that... and that they basically did. And it didn't matter what sector of the country we would be flying in, it always seemed like the same guy was talking. Over the years that tone of voice had become somewhat of a comforting sound to pilots everywhere. Conversely, over the years, pilots always wanted to ensure that, when transmitting, they sounded like Chuck Yeager, or at least like John Wayne. Better to die than sound bad on the radios.

    Just moments after the Cessna's inquiry, a Twin Beech piped up on frequency, in a rather superior tone, asking for his ground speed.

    "Ah, Twin Beach: I have you at one hundred and twenty-five knots of ground speed."

    Boy, I thought, the Beechcraft really must think he is dazzling his Cessna brethren.

    Then out of the blue, a Navy F-18 pilot out of NAS Lemoore came up on frequency. You knew right away it was a Navy jock because he sounded very cool on the radios.

    "Center, Dusty 52 ground speed check."

    Before Center could reply, I'm thinking to myself, hey, Dusty 52 has a ground speed indicator in that million dollar cockpit, so why is he asking Center for a readout? Then I got it -- ol' Dusty here is making sure that every bug smasher from Mount Whitney to the Mojave knows what true speed is. He's the fastest dude in the valley today, and he just wants everyone to know how much fun he is having in his new Hornet.

    And the reply, always with that same, calm, voice, with more distinct alliteration than emotion:

    "Dusty 52, Center, we have you at 620 on the ground."

    And I thought to myself, is this a ripe situation, or what? As my hand instinctively reached for the mic button, I had to remind myself that Walt was in control of the radios. Still, I thought, it must be done -- in mere seconds we'll be out of the sector and the opportunity will be lost. That Hornet must die, and die now.

    I thought about all of our Sim training and how important it was that we developed well as a crew and knew that to jump in on the radios now would destroy the integrity of all that we had worked toward becoming. I was torn. Somewhere, 13 miles above Arizona, there was a pilot screaming inside his space helmet.

    Then, I heard it. The click of the mic button from the back seat. That was the very moment that I knew Walter and I had become a crew. Very professionally, and with no emotion, Walter spoke:

    "Los Angeles Center, Aspen 20, can you give us a ground speed check?"

    There was no hesitation, and the reply came as if was an everyday request:

    "Aspen 20, I show you at one thousand eight hundred and forty-two knots, across the ground."

    I think it was the forty-two knots that I liked the best, so accurate and proud was Center to deliver that information without hesitation, and you just knew he was smiling. But the precise point at which I knew that Walt and I were going to be really good friends for a long time was when he keyed the mic once again to say, in his most fighter-pilot-like voice:


    "Ah, Center, much thanks. We're showing closer to nineteen hundred on the money."

    For a moment Walter was a god. And we finally heard a little crack in the armor of the HoustonCentervoice, when L.A. came back with,

    "Roger that Aspen, Your equipment is probably more accurate than ours. You boys have a good one."

    It all had lasted for just moments, but in that short, memorable sprint across the southwest, the Navy had been flamed, all mortal airplanes on freq were forced to bow before the King of Speed, and more importantly, Walter and I had crossed the threshold of being a crew. A fine day's work.

    We never heard another transmission on that frequency all the way to the coast. For just one day, it truly was fun being the fastest guys out there.
     
  27. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Good ****, Bro!!

    :icon_eek: :yes: :icon_rofl:
     
  28. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  29. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    I haven't run this thru Snopes, but...

    This is a sad commentary re the average American (?) citizen.

    hank



    Luke AFB is west of Phoenix and is rapidly being surrounded by civilization
    that complains about the noise from the base and its planes, forgetting that
    it was there long before they were.

    A certain lieutenant colonel at Luke AFB deserves a big pat on the back.
    Apparently, an individual who lives somewhere near Luke AFB wrote the local
    paper complaining about a group of F-16s that disturbed his/her day at the
    mall. When that individual read the response from a Luke AFB officer, it
    must have stung quite a bit.


    The complaint: "Question of the day for Luke Air Force Base: Whom do we
    thank for the morning air show? Last Wednesday , at precisely 9:11 a.m., a
    tight formation of four F-16 jets made a low pass over Arrowhead Mall,
    continuing west over Bell Road at approximately 500 feet. Imagine our good
    fortune! Do the Tom Cruise-wannabes feel we need this wake-up call, or were
    they trying to impress the cashiers at Mervyns early bird special? Any
    response would be appreciated."


    The response: Regarding "A wake-up call from Luke's jets" (Letters,
    Thursday): On June 15, at precisely 9:12 a.m., a perfectly timed four-ship
    flyby of F-16s from the 63rd Fighter Squadron at Luke Air Force Base flew
    over the grave of Capt. Jeremy Fresques. Capt. Fresques was an Air Force
    officer who was previously stationed at Luke Air Force Base and was killed
    in Iraq on May 30, Memorial Day. At 9 a.m . on June 15, his family and
    friends gathered at Sunland Memorial Park in Sun City to mourn the loss of a
    husband, son and friend. Based on the letter writer's recount of the flyby,
    and because of the jet noise, I'm sure you didn't hear the 21-gun salute,
    the playing of taps, or my words to the widow and parents of Capt. Fresques
    as I gave them their son's flag on behalf of the President of the United
    States and all those veterans and servicemen and women who understand the
    sacrifices they have endured. A four-ship flyby is a display of respect the
    Air Force pays to those who give their lives in defense of freedom. We are
    professional aviators and take our jobs seriously, and on June 15 what the
    letter writer witnessed was four officers lining up to pay their ultimate
    respects. The letter writer asks, "Whom do we thank for the morning air
    show?" The 56th Fighter Wing will call for you, and forward your thanks to
    the widow and parents of Capt. Fresques, and thank them for you, for it was
    in their honor that my pilots flew the most honorable formation of their
    lives.

    Lt. Col. Scott Pleus
    CO 63rd Fighter Squadron
    Luke AFB
     
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  30. Shamrock

    Shamrock New Member

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    Snopes.com says it's true, and adds this extra note:


    To his credit, the complainant, Mr. MacRae, tendered a written apology which was published in The Republic on 9 July:
    Regarding "Flyby honoring fallen comrade" (Letters, June 28):


    I read with increasing embarrassment and humility the response to my unfortunate letter to The Republic concerning an Air Force flyby ("A wake-up call from Luke's jets," Letters, June 23).

    I had no idea of the significance of the flyby, and would never have insulted such a fine and respectful display had I known.

    I have received many calls from the fine airmen who are serving or have served at Luke, and I have attempted to explain my side and apologized for any discomfort my letter has caused.

    This was simply an uninformed citizen complaining about noise.

    I have been made aware in both written and verbal communications of the four-ship flyby, and my heart goes out to each and every lost serviceman and woman in this war in which we are engaged.

    I have been called un-American by an unknown caller and I feel that I must address that. I served in the U.S. Navy and am a Vietnam veteran. I love my country and respect the jobs that the service organizations are doing.

    Please accept my heartfelt apologies.

    Tom MacRae, Peoria6
     

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