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Goodbye to Roger "the in-artful dodger" Goodell?!

Discussion in 'Chargers Fan Forum' started by Blitzy, Sep 10, 2014.

  1. Blitzy

    Blitzy Spanos Chargers Troll

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  2. Blitzy

    Blitzy Spanos Chargers Troll

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    Squirm and dance your way around this one you A-Hole... Then again, you facilitated the sale of the Buffalo Bills to the tune of nearly 1.5 Billion, so the 32 Dons may keep you around till after the season. Did I say that He is an A-Hole? ;)
     
  3. Blue Bolt

    Blue Bolt Persona Non Grata

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    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Blitzy

    Blitzy Spanos Chargers Troll

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    ^^^ :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: ^^^
     
  5. HEXEDBOLT

    HEXEDBOLT Don't like it, lump it!!!

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    That must be the pocket the NFL didn't grease and like a wheel it is now squeaky.
     
  6. Blue Bolt

    Blue Bolt Persona Non Grata

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    And it just keeps getting better....... :rolleyes:

    Report: NFL security investigating whether league office got tape
    Posted by Michael David Smith on September 10, 2014, 7:19 PM EDT


    NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell says no one in the league office saw the infamous video of Ray Rice punching his wife until it was published this week. The Associated Press says someone in the league office did, in fact, see the video months ago.

    So now the NFL is having its security department investigate the matter.

    That’s the word from Norah O’Donnell of CBS, who conducted the interview with Goodell this week in which he insisted he hadn’t seen the Rice video until TMZ published it. O’Donnell wrote on Twitter that someone she described as a “top NFL executive” told her the investigation is already underway.

    “We are looking into it,” that source said. “Our security department will be doing everything we can to determine if this is true.”

    There are several problems with this. For starters, what makes anyone think the NFL’s own security department is competent to handle this investigation? If NFL security couldn’t get its hands on the Rice tape in the first place, why should we believe NFL security can get to the bottom of whether someone else had the Rice tape?

    Furthermore, there’s an obvious, blatant conflict with the NFL having its own security department conduct this investigation. If the NFL wants anyone to trust any type of investigation into this matter, it needs to ask an independent investigator who’s not beholden to the league to conduct the investigation.

    The “top NFL executive” also told O’Donnell that “if there’s a delivery sitting under someone’s desk there will be consequences.” In other words, if it’s true — as the Associated Press reported today — that a law enforcement source gave a league official the video months ago, that league official may be in trouble for not passing it up the chain of command.

    That might sound like it makes sense, but it’s the wrong tone to strike at the outset of an investigation. The purpose of this investigation should be to seek the truth, not to seek punishment for this as-yet-unnamed league official who supposedly saw the tape months ago. The fact that top NFL executives are already threatening consequences means that NFL employees are going to head into this investigation looking to protect their own jobs, rather than to reveal the truth to investigators.

    For the NFL, this case is a mess. And no matter what the investigation uncovers, it’s surely going to get messier.
     
  7. Sydalish

    Sydalish Addicted to Sports

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    Despite all of this, I would be VERY surprised to see him ousted.
     
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  8. Blue Bolt

    Blue Bolt Persona Non Grata

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    As would I....... they will ride this out for as long as they possibly can. It's only the "little people" who are ever held accountable.
     
  9. matilack

    matilack Take A Knee McCree!!!

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    I just don't care that much. He lied, people lie on the time to save their own ***, he's not an elected official so get over it. JMO
     
  10. Blitzy

    Blitzy Spanos Chargers Troll

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    It has nothing to do with whether being an elected official or saving his own arse! He is the Commissioner of one of the most prolific professional leagues in the World and the most profitable league here in the U.S. With that level of prestige, comes billions of dollars of advertising revenue and therefore tremendous amount of scrutiny.

    If Roger Goodell is deemed by the majority of the 32 Owner's to be a liability for the NFL Brand in light of the Ray Rice debacle, then he will have to go. What is my beef with him? Ever since he has come to take the reins at the helm, he has been tweaking excessively with the game that IMHO will take more excitement out of the game. When an industry is as big as The NFL, it doesn't take a real genius to reap the rewards but it will take a special kind of a person to farg it all up, and IMO, Roger Goodell may just fit that latter billing ;)
     
  11. Blitzy

    Blitzy Spanos Chargers Troll

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    BTW, how would you feel if it came to light that Steve Bisciotti had intimated to Goodell to bury the evidence? How did you feel after he buried the evidence against the Patriots and the Spy Gate scandal? How would you have felt about the Commish of the sport which you seem to love and live for, if your team was in the SB vs the Pats and the Pats had spied on your teams practice?

    I doubt if you'd be so casual and pedestrian about it ;)
     
  12. matilack

    matilack Take A Knee McCree!!!

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    So?

    I'm not going to stop watching the NFL over this. Are you?
     
  13. Blitzy

    Blitzy Spanos Chargers Troll

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    Over Ray Rice? No.

    Over possibly diluting the game and farging things up for my taste? Absolutely! It's a personal choice.
     
  14. matilack

    matilack Take A Knee McCree!!!

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    Things that affect the game are one thing, this situation is something else entirely.

    As it doesn't affect me, the Chargers, Chargers fans, or the overall product on the field, I just can't find it in me to care that another obscenely rich executive lied to the public to save face. I just expect it of people now days, especially people with a lot to lose.
     
  15. matilack

    matilack Take A Knee McCree!!!

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    Again you're talking about things that affect the actual game of football.
     
  16. Blitzy

    Blitzy Spanos Chargers Troll

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    But what (and why) did he have to (allegedly) lie about? He didn't commit that assault and battery. An idiot RB of an NFL team did it. Hence my contention, if Goodell is capable of a cover up in this case because of an owner's request (speculating) then what else is his realm capable of? Why would I want to watch something that may be tainted if my team is a small market team? I haven't watched basketball for over 10 years and I could care less about that league, even though it has cleaned up its act far above and over that of NFL's!
     
  17. Blitzy

    Blitzy Spanos Chargers Troll

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    Yes, hypocrisy and cover ups may not just be limited to administrative issues. The Spygate matter was a major issue that was swept under the rug and all evidence was disposed of.
     
  18. matilack

    matilack Take A Knee McCree!!!

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    You're letting your imagination get away from you. When you hear something about the NFL fixing games let me know.
     
  19. Blue Bolt

    Blue Bolt Persona Non Grata

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    Rockefeller wants to investigate NFL
    Posted by Mike Florio on September 10, 2014, 9:07 PM EDT


    During Wednesday’s Pro Football Talk on NBCSN, an email emerged from the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation regarding an executive session being scheduled for Wednesday September 17, 2014.

    “Agenda is forthcoming,” the message said. But since the message landed in the PFT inbox, I had a feeling it had something to do with the Ray Rice scandal.

    It did and it does, according to Armando Salguero of the Miami Herald. Per Salguero, Senator Jay Rockefeller (D.-W. Va.) wants to hold hearings regarding the NFL’s domestic violence problem. Those hearings, if they happen, undoubtedly will address the botched Rice investigation — perhaps getting to the bottom of something the NFL may not be inclined to get to the bottom of.

    Rockefeller, as Salguero points out, is retiring this year. So it’s not an election-year ploy to win votes.

    And before anyone says that Congress has better things to do, the NFL has grown over the years into an important public institution, with tax-exempt status for the league office, an exemption to the antitrust laws for its broadcast contracts, and many publicly-financed stadiums.

    Besides, it’s important that a league that at times behaves as if it answers to no one answer at times to someone. With fans not inclined to cut off their NFL habit to spite their painted faces, Congress becomes the best vehicle for ensuring that the NFL operates not as a tail-chasing echo chamber but as a responsible American institution.
     
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  20. Blitzy

    Blitzy Spanos Chargers Troll

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    Spy Gate is not a figment of my imagination. I actually used to think that perhaps some fans used to believe too much into conspiracy theories about the league, but after this debacle, I won;t be so easily convinced that the Commish's office is a clean slate. Match fixing? Show me somewhere that I was referring to match fixing :eek:
     
  21. Blue Bolt

    Blue Bolt Persona Non Grata

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    So, you didn't buy the whole "we had to destroy the evidence to prevent it from falling into the wrong hands" rationale? :confused:
     
  22. Pointyearedog

    Pointyearedog I only put idiots on ignore...

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    The NFL is one of the biggest NON-PROFIT organizations in the world. And this guy Goodell acknowledged that they had the video evidence back in April. And he is only making like he just found out? I smell something fishy here...

    fishchick.gif
     
  23. Blitzy

    Blitzy Spanos Chargers Troll

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    Not this Matti ;)
     
  24. Blue Bolt

    Blue Bolt Persona Non Grata

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    NFL hires independent investigator in Ray Rice case
    Posted by Mike Florio on September 10, 2014, 11:04 PM EDT


    On Tuesday, we made the case for the NFL hiring an independent investigator to get to the bottom of the botched Ray Rice investigation. On Wednesday night, after a bombshell report from the Associated Pressplaced a copy of the infamous elevator video inside the walls of 345 Park Avenue in April, the NFL decided to make the call for outside help.

    The league has announced that former FBI director Robert Mueller will lead an independent investigation into the NFL’s handling of the Rice case. Presumably, the investigation will be far more independent and objective than the review conducted by Mary Jo White in the bounty case. Two years ago, White behaved as an independent advocate for the league’s hammering of the Saints, not as an independent investigator. It’s critical that Mueller be truly and completely independent, with no agenda or directive or predetermined outcome.

    It’s also critical that his results be reported publicly. The league hid nothing regarding the bullying scandal in Miami. The league should hide nothing here.

    Hiring an independent investigator was the only viable option. Entrusting the internal review of the Associated Press report to NFL Security made no sense, since NFL Security becomes the obvious starting point for the search for the culprit. Also, with a slew of early retirements, resignations, and possibly even terminations likely once the dust settles, NFL Security likely has the most to lose moving forward, since that’s the department initially responsible for the multiple failures of diligence, logic, and/or common sense.
     
  25. Blue Bolt

    Blue Bolt Persona Non Grata

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    How independent will Robert Mueller be?
    Posted by Mike Florio on September 11, 2014, 10:14 AM EDT


    When the NFL announced that an independent investigator had been hired to explore the league office’s poor-at-best handling of the Ray Rice case, I thought the league had taken a clear step in the right direction.

    When I saw that two old-guard owners would oversee what would otherwise be an independent investigation, I became a little concerned that the investigation wouldn’t truly be independent.

    When I realized that the man hired to do the investigation works for WilmerHale, the law firm that helped the NFL recently negotiate a multi-billion-dollar contract with DirecTV, any hope of true and genuine independence evaporated. As explained by ESPN.com, the firm previously has represented Washington owner Daniel Snyder, and several members of the firm have taken jobs with NFL teams.

    One such former WilmerHale employee is, coincidentally, Ravens president Dick Cass, who joined the club after thirty-plus years at the firm.

    While the tentacles aren’t as numerous as those connecting the league office to a law firm like Covington & Burling, the NFL-WilmerHale linkage suggests that Robert Mueller isn’t and won’t be truly independent. At some level, Mueller possibly will be influenced by his firm’s separate relationship with the NFL. Even if he isn’t, the appearance of a potential influence makes it impossible to fully trust the independence of the investigation.

    That’s why the best choice would have been (and still could be) to give former Commissioner Paul Tagliabue a significant role in this process. Who knows the inner workings of the league office better than the man who presided over it for twice as long as Goodell has? Two years ago, Tagliabue displayed his ability to be independent and objective when scuttling Goodell’s suspensions of various players for the bounty case.

    If the goal is to not only get to the truth but to create the impression that a truly independent effort has been undertaken to find the truth, Mueller is the wrong choice. Tagliabue ultimately could be the right one.
     
  26. Sandolf

    Sandolf Blue Moon Rising

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    Sept. 11 is kind of a weird day to be discussing the conspiracy behind covering up the fact a football player was smacking his girlfriend. Life goes on and all of that, but there are greater questions.
     
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  27. Blue Bolt

    Blue Bolt Persona Non Grata

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    Report: Roger Goodell has support of owners, for now
    Posted by Darin Gantt on September 11, 2014, 12:48 PM EDT


    For now, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell has the support of the owners.

    But at least one of them seems to be hedging his bets, awaiting the outcome of the independent investigation into the handling of the Ray Rice punishment.

    Peter King of TheMMQB.com talked to at least two owners, and there’s still a general sense of support for Goodell.

    But at least one indicated that’s not necessarily permanent, and that Goodell might not survive the latest wave of bad news.

    “This is a good first step,” an owner told King. “But we need to be prepared for any outcome.”

    “I am starting to get a sick feeling about how out of control this is getting,” another owner said. “But I am standing by Roger. He has been great for our league.”

    That he has made them all a pile of money is one reason Goodell is still widely believed to be safe in his job.

    But as important, if not more so, are the owners who are loyal to him.

    Goodell already has on-the-record backing from Patriots owner Robert Kraft, Giants co-owner John Mara and Cowboys owner Jerry Jones. He was scheduled to present an award last night to Panthers owner Jerry Richardson (canceling at the last minute when this thing got even uglier).

    Mara and Steelers president Art Rooney II (another Goodell supporter) are overseeing the investigation headed by former FBI director Robert Mueller.

    Those five owners are some of the most influential in league matters, and Goodell has them squarely on his side.

    The situation can always change, but it might take clear evidence of a cover-up to erode the support he’s built from his bosses, which is built on the back of billions of dollars.
     
  28. Sandolf

    Sandolf Blue Moon Rising

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    Ray Rice and the 'gotcha' mindset
    By William Choslovsky

    Call me an enabler or something worse, but I feel a bit sorry for Ray Rice. Not a lot sorry, just a bit.

    We all know — and have actually seen — what happened: He knocked his then-fiancee unconscious in a hotel elevator.

    After an investigation, he was suspended for two games. Then in rapid succession, when video surfaced, he was cut by his team, the Baltimore Ravens, followed by the NFL suspending him "indefinitely." And now there are calls to ban him for life from the NFL.

    Separately, he was also prosecuted through the criminal justice system, no different than any other criminal.

    Actually, he might have been treated differently than most other criminals. That is, with the spotlight turned up, he might have been treated worse, meaning most other first-time offenders with no complaining witness probably would not have been subject to a grand jury, let alone massive public ridicule.

    So this we all know. But who also knew that Rice's father was gunned down as an unintended victim in a drive-by shooting when Rice was just a year old? Who knew that 10 years later, the male role model in his life was killed in a car accident by another driver, again leaving Rice without a male role model? Who knew that Ray's mother once said of Ray, "He was a man before he was a boy"?

    And who cares, especially when there is a good story to tell? Who has time for any nuance? Who cares that his victim is now his wife, who steadfastly stands by his side? Who knows or cares whether this was perhaps Ray's one and only mistake, albeit a terrible and inexcusable one?

    Once upon a time, athletes, celebrities and the super-rich were treated better than everyone else simply because of their status. They would get a pass from criminal prosecution. Their misdeeds would be hidden.

    That, of course, was wrong. Very wrong.

    But I can't help but wonder whether today's athletes and celebrities are now treated worse than the "average Joe" when it comes to mistakes. That is, has the pendulum swung from one extreme to the other?

    In the old days, the notion was simple: What happens outside the job is of no concern so long as the employee does his or her job. Let's face it, most people do something wrong outside of work, and still today it does not cost them their job, let alone their career forever.

    For those who say, "but it should," I wonder how we would all be judged if judged by our worst and most private moments.

    To be clear, I am no apologist for bad behavior, and actions, of course, have consequences. Some crimes — like the slayings former New England Patriots player Aaron Hernandez was charged with — are so heinous there is nothing to talk about. Likewise with rape and violent gun crimes.

    And, yes, such a discussion ultimately involves line-drawing and discretion, which is why the people who run the leagues make the big bucks.

    In the case of Rice, of course he should be condemned and seriously punished.

    But the public outcry calling for a lifetime ban against Rice has a different flavor.

    It all wreaks of a "gotcha" mindset society has now developed. Make a mistake — especially if you are a high-profile person — and good riddance, we say, some sort of collective cleansing. It is almost as if it is a way for the rest of us mere commoners to feel a bit better about ourselves and feel superior to the high-profile folks we will never be.

    But if the criminal justice system, and even Rice's wife, can punish and forgive — but not excuse — him, why can't the rest of us? Perhaps the mass flogging says more about us than it does Rice.

    Instead of banning Rice from the NFL for life, why not suspend him for a year and condition his reinstatement on 50 percent of his salary going to domestic abuse awareness campaigns? That is, assuming he is remorseful and owns his actions, why not use his mistakes as a way to teach and better ourselves, rather than merely as the modern equivalent of the public firing squad?


    William Choslovsky is a lawyer who lives and works in Chicago.
     
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  29. Blue Bolt

    Blue Bolt Persona Non Grata

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    I'm not onboard with the lifetime ban brigade, but that's not what he's under. Indefinite, means just that. He can come back at a later date, but obviously it's an open ended question. RBs have short careers as it is, after a year way from the game, he probably won't have much of a "career" left anyway...... certainly not for big money.
     
  30. Blitzy

    Blitzy Spanos Chargers Troll

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    I think that Ray Rice's attorney should advise him to go nuclear on the League Office and expose them for the scoundrels who they are. Since ray Rice is seemingly going to be the ultimate scapegoat, then he should care less about the Ravens (even the alleged murder suspect threw him under the proverbial bus), the Raven's ownership and the Commish. Farg 'em all, Ray...

    I am voicing strong advocacy, not because I don't like the League or the game, but I'd hate to see this League to go down the path of a POS organization like FIFA which is utterly and insanely corrupt.
     

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