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Is Goodell good for the NFL?

Discussion in 'Chargers Fan Forum' started by Concudan, Jul 21, 2007.

  1. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Rodger Goodell took over as the Commissioner of the National Football League on September 1, 2006, just prior to the start of the football season. He took over for the very successful and popular Paul Tagliabue. He came into office somewhat quietly and unknown.

    Goodell's career in the National Football League began in 1982 as an administrative intern in the league office in New York under then-Commissioner Pete Rozelle . He was able to secure the position by means of an extensive letter-writing campaign to the league office and each of its then 28 teams. In 1983, he joined the New York Jets as an intern, but returned to the league office in 1984 as an assistant serving in the public relations department.

    In 1987, Goodell then took over as the assistant to the president of the American Football Conference (Lamar Hunt), and worked with then NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue in variety of football and business operations roles. This lead to his appointment as the NFL's Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer in December 2001.

    As the NFL's COO, Goodell took responsibility for the league's football operations and officiating, as well as the supervision of league business functions. He headed NFL Ventures, which oversees the league's business units, including media properties, marketing and sales, stadium development and strategic planning.

    Goodell was heavily involved in the negotiation of the league's current collective bargaining agreement. He had worked extensively with Paul Tagliabue since the latter became commissioner in 1989. He has played an extensive role in league expansion, realignment, and stadium development, including the launch of the NFL Network and securing new television agreements as well as the latest collective bargaining agreement with the NFL Players Association.

    Goodell’s first season as the Commissioner of the NFL was one in which he was relatively quiet. The big news from his office came in November when he mentioned that there was a possibility that the NFL might expand beyond the boarders of the US. However the acts that will mark Goodell, and define his tenure as NFL Commissioner did not come until the following off season. Early in 2007, player problems were at an all time high. Players were having legal issues, having run ins with the law, and creating a negative impression of the NFL, and the caliber of people that are involved in it.

    This was frustrating to many fans because though the ‘trouble’ players occupied most of the air time on the news casts, many of us realized that there were a greater percentage of players who did great things. Good things that very rarely hit the new casts because ‘good doesn’t get ratings’ in American news broadcasts.

    Goodell took action to protect the image of the NFL. His first action occurred on April 10, 2007. A day in which Commissioner Goodell issued game suspensions for Adam "Pacman" Jones, of the Tennessee Titans, and Chris Henry, of the Cincinnati Bengals. Pacman felt the wrath of the Commissioner as he was dealt a full sixteen game suspension for Conduct detrimental to the NFL. Henry felt the sting of an eight game suspension. The two players are suspended without pay. Pacman Jones will lose $1,292,500, his 2007 base salary as a result of the suspension. Chris Henry will lose $204,705.88 in salary if the Bengals' bye week comes after Week 8. He will lose $230,294.12 if the Bengals' bye week falls in the first eight weeks of the season, meaning he will miss nine weeks of pay. Also, after they serve their suspensions, each player must apply for reinstatement. So their behavior during the period of the suspensions could carry much weight into the bid for reinstatement.

    Commissioner Goodell issued a statement concerning the two suspensions, a statement which set the tone for his tenure, and let all players of the NFL know that a new sheriff was in town; "We must protect the integrity of the NFL," "The highest standards of conduct must be met by everyone in the NFL because it is a privilege to represent the NFL, not a right. These players, and all members of our league, have to make the right choices and decisions in their conduct on a consistent basis."

    Commissioner Goodell also wrote each player informing them of his stance and opinion: "Your conduct has brought embarrassment and ridicule upon yourself, your club, and the NFL, and has damaged the reputation of players throughout the league. You have put in jeopardy an otherwise promising NFL career, and have risked both your own safety and the safety of others through your off-field actions. In each of these respects, you have engaged in conduct detrimental to the NFL and failed to live up to the standards expected of NFL players. Taken as a whole, this conduct warrants significant sanction."

    On June 4th, Commissioner Goodell issues his third suspension of his short tenure, this time leveling another eight game suspension on Terry "Tank" Johnson of the Chicago Bears. The suspension followed a troubled time for Tank Johnson who had spent two months in the Cook County jail for violating probation on a gun charge.

    Goddell has chosen to take a hard line stance that very well could lead to disagreements and conflicts between the Players Association and the management of the NFL on the severity of such suspensions. This stance could also lead to the NFLPA challenging the ability of NFL management to make such ruling and suspensions. Some feel that such steps were necessary while others contend that they are heavy handed and violate the intent of the player’s contracts.

    However I would hasten to point out that the NFL has been taking steps to inform players of the manner in which they are expected to conduct themselves. This off season saw the eleventh NFL Rookie Symposium. A meeting where all drafted rookies in the NFL get together and hear from past and present players.

    The program, includes sessions on developing life skills, personal finances, football operations, the league's substance abuse program, career planning, and general circumstances that might confront a young player. It features speakers from the NFL office, the NFL Players Association, and from professionals in areas outside the game.

    Current and former players address the rookies about their experiences in dealing with the pressures inherent to their profession. Players attend workshops that include interactive assignments, where they will receive instant feedback on their answers to questions about the particular theme of a session. The topics range from things like monitoring investments, what to expect in your first training camp and how to prepare for life after the game.

    The Symposium marks the one and only time the league gets an opportunity to address its entire draft class in the same setting, and the NFL works hard, acknowledged league vice president of player development Mike Haynes, to deliver counsel and direction to a captive audience. Attendance, by league decree, is mandatory.

    The NFL has been for some time now letting the players know what is expected. Commissioner Goodell’s actions are the next locigal and progressive step to protect the NFL, its players and in fact the public at large. It is my opinion that Goodell’s brave actions will define him as one of the best Commissioners in the history of the NFL, and that he and his actions are indeed good for the organization that governs, produces and makes available the game that many of us love.
     
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  2. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    I agree!!
     
  3. HEXEDBOLT

    HEXEDBOLT Don't like it, lump it!!!

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    Trumpie ain't gonna like this guy, he's the son of a senator. But hell, most folks wouldn't like southern style country ham either.:bolt:
     
  4. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    I like southern country hams.

    Goodell is doing a great job IMO. He is making the hard calls that others refused to make. He is taking a step to protect the game and the league. It can not be easy the steps he is taking.
     
  5. HEXEDBOLT

    HEXEDBOLT Don't like it, lump it!!!

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    He is doing a great job, it's time for these guys to stand up and be accountable for their actions. I know I'd give up just about anything to have the privilege to play in the NFL. :bolt:
     
  6. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Agree 100% on all accounts.
     
  7. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Country Ham and Red-eye Gravy!! :yes: :tup:
     
  8. DefenseWins

    DefenseWins Well-Known Member

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    In answer to the question asked - at least in regards to player conduct he is definitely good for the NFL :yes:


    I just want to know though - who wrote that for you Conc? :icon_tease: :lol:

    Whoever it was, tell them that they left out an important aspect...
    It was through this venue that Goodell had a number of discussions about the subject of player conduct with respected members of the NFLPA. It provided him with a good feel for the player's side of things and helped pave the way for those tough decisions he made, helping to short-circuit the likelyhood of possible conflicts with them over his new, tougher policy.

    He also had meetings with the players disciplined, giving them an opportunity to give their side of things prior to the suspensions that were handed down. No doubt this also helped portray an impression of fairness and respect. These types of acts exemplify his excellent management skills which will greatly aid the just cause he has embarked upon.:yes:

    All kidding aside - nice take Mr. Short Hairs.
     
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  9. HEXEDBOLT

    HEXEDBOLT Don't like it, lump it!!!

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    Now your talking and I'd rep you if I could.:tup: :icon_toast:
     
  10. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Onea the good things I took when I left the South...well, and a healthy respect for College Basketball along Tobacco Road :yes:
     
  11. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Very good points, my statement about Goodell's action possibly leading to conflict is that sometimes what makes sense still gets peoples dander up. The NFLPA has before protested actions before that has made sense. I am not saying the conflicts will happen now, but say if in three years the number suspended grows, the NFLPA might feel they have to step in to control the situation, or to impose rules on the ability of the Commissioner to suspend.

    Thank you for your feedback, I appreciate it.
     
  12. Charger Dave

    Charger Dave Dead account

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    I have to agree Conc - (good thread BTW and well thought out). I'm certain this is not the particular "roll" Goodell envisioned himself filling as NFL Commisioner in all those years he was preparing himself to be eligible to take over the job but it is the job as its been left for him and he is handling it as well as the owner's could expect. They certainly hired a decision maker with enough iron to make the hard calls.

    Up to this point, he appears to have the respect and backing of an overwhelming percentage of the players, and the NFLPA. I hope that continues. The players themselves are responsible for their "activities" off the field - knowing they can/will be held accountable by the League itself will undoubtedly cause a certain elevation of caution in most - ......and then there is always that fabled 10%... :yes:
     
  13. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    So far, the suspensions have been done with the full support of the NFLPA...I think THEY all recognize the "thug" image of the NFL has to change, and drastic measures must be taken.
     
  14. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    I do as well, but we have all seen things like this change as time passes. I hope it doesnt because these rich thug kids do nothing to help the NFL.
     
  15. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Condi?
     
  16. Retired Catholic

    Retired Catholic BoltTalker

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    So far Goodell has done extremely well. Just as long as he doesn't get to used to exercising power and widens the loop a little too far. Power tends to corrupt, absolute power corrupts absolutely. I like the post. The NFLPA's involvement lends legitimacy to the whole process. Contract negotiations should be interesting next time around. Good post. The NBA could use a similar set up.
     
  17. RipTheJacker

    RipTheJacker Well-Known Member

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    up until this past week, i would of said yes, but the way he handled the Vick thing is a disgrace an shows he doesnt have the balls to disipline one of the major money makers
     
  18. reddenedbeard

    reddenedbeard Well-Known Member

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    Honestly I think the Vick thing isn't done. I believe that there has been no action yet by the NFL because he wants teams to take some responsibilities for their players actions. If nothing is done by the Falcon ownership, then I think there will be some action from the NFL.

    I think the actions that that Goodell has set forth will ultimately make the NFL stronger and more respected. The NFL doesn't need the same sort of reputation as the NBA.
     
  19. RipTheJacker

    RipTheJacker Well-Known Member

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    If that was the case, why didnt the titans and bengals get that option?

    The only reason Vick hasnt been suspended is because he sells jerseys

    If this was Igor Olshanky or Brodney Pool or Greg Jennings, they would of been suspended for at least the entire season already
     
  20. reddenedbeard

    reddenedbeard Well-Known Member

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    I'm not so sure about that .. I think Goodell sent the message to teams to clean up their own houses and if they don't, the NFL is going to step in. Jones had a history and there were not only several different incidents, there was also some time before he handed down any suspension. Remember, he did meet with Jones prior to his suspension and it was at that time he was given the year.

    What I think has been missing in all this isn't the fact that he is guilty or not, but the timeline of the other incidents.
     
  21. RipTheJacker

    RipTheJacker Well-Known Member

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    And? Was this vicks first offense?

    What about the mary jane water bottle department? What the time he flipped off all the fans at a home game? what about when he intentionally gave a girl herpres (Ron Mexico incident)

    All of those are worse than anything Chris Henry has done yet he was suspended before the team was ever given a chance to do anything
     
  22. RipTheJacker

    RipTheJacker Well-Known Member

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    How many times was PacMan arrested before his suspension?
     
  23. LV Bolt Fan

    LV Bolt Fan Well-Known Member

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    I guessing... 5
    :icon_shrug:
     

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