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League shipwrecks Captain Morgan campaign

Discussion in 'Chargers Fan Forum' started by wrbanwal, Nov 12, 2009.

  1. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    I don't know if this is true but if it is,

    SHAME ON YOU NFL!!!!


    I can understand if the player was getting paid but in this case the money was going to a charity to help ex-nfl players.

    :tdown::tdown::tdown:


    Captain Morgan may have pulled off the quietest and shortest-lived advertising ambush in sports history last Sunday. One that was almost universally unknown, barely noticed, and yet, promptly squashed by the NFL this week.

    Like the other 21.9 million viewers watching the Dallas Cowboys face the Philadelphia Eagles on Sunday night, you probably missed it. But the brand name known for spiced rum achieved the rare feat of sneaking an advertising fastball by the NFL – in the middle of a nationally televised game, no less. During the third quarter of Dallas’ 20-16 win, Eagles tight end Brent Celek(notes) caught an 11-yard touchdown pass from Donovan McNabb(notes), then appeared to purposefully back up and align himself in front of television cameras. Putting his hands on his hips, Celek raised his right leg, mimicking a pose similar to the pirate on Captain Morgan’s label.

    As far as anyone knows, it’s the first time we’ve seen that type of guerilla-style advertising campaign in an NFL end zone. And if the league has its way, it will be the last, too. The “Captain Morgan” was effectively banned this week after the league learned of a wider campaign meant to get players to repeatedly strike the pose during NFL games.

    “A company can’t pay a player to somehow promote it’s product on the field,” NFL spokesman Greg Aiello told Yahoo! Sports this week. “Every league has the same rule. … It’s come up before, companies trying to use our games and then players for ambush marketing purposes.”

    Celek’s pose actually resulted in a 15-yard penalty for demonstration, which was incurred when teammate Jason Avant(notes) tried to help him achieve the perfect Captain Morgan form. Afterward, Celek spoke through an Eagles spokesman and denied any knowledge of a Captain Morgan campaign. But an account executive handling the promotion told Yahoo! Sports the Eagles tight end was indeed involved.

    In hopes of raising brand awareness, Captain Morgan intended to offer lucrative charity contributions in exchange for each instance a player was caught on camera doing its pose during a game. The contributions were earmarked for the Gridiron Greats Assistance Fund – a non-profit which helps retired NFL players with various hardships after leaving the game.

    “The [ad campaign] has been going around internally for a while and [Celek] learned of the program through his contact at Diageo [Captain Morgan’s parent company],” said Glenn Lehrman, an account director at Rogers & Cowan, the Los Angeles-based firm that handles Captain Morgan promotions. “Brent said, ‘You know what, if I get the opportunity, I’m going to go ahead and do it.’ He sort of beat us to the punch, but we’re certainly not going to complain.”

    The campaign was set to be unveiled next week and was fairly simple: For every time a player was caught on camera striking the “Captain Morgan” during a regular season game, $10,000 would be donated to Gridiron Greats. For each instance in the playoffs, the donation would elevate to $25,000. And for instances in the Super Bowl, the bounty was slated to hit $100,000 per pose.

    But when the NFL caught wind of the plan this week, it promptly put the brakes on the promotion, notifying Gridiron Greats and Captain Morgan that it wouldn’t tolerate the pose during NFL games. And while Celek won’t be fined for doing it Sunday, a league source also told Yahoo! Sports that striking the pose in future games will result in a “significant” penalty.

    It’s not the first time the league has taken a hard-line stance against “guerilla” marketing tactics. Indeed, the NFL fined Chicago Bears linebacker Brian Urlacher(notes) $100,000 simply for wearing a hat promoting vitaminwater during the league’s media day prior to Super Bowl XLI. And in another incident, former commissioner Pete Rozelle fined Bears quarterback Jim McMahon $5,000 for wearing a headband with “adidas” on it during a playoff game in 1985. McMahon then famously responded in the NFC Championship game with a headband that read “rozelle.”

    “Every league has the same rule. … It’s come up before, companies trying to use our games and then players for ambush marketing purposes.”


    The NFL will likely be a little more sensitive with this latest promotion, since it would have benefitted Gridiron Greats, and the post-career struggles of players has been a paramount hot-button topic. While the league welcomes charitable donations to Gridiron Greats, it doesn’t want those contributions to be used as a carrot to influence the on-field antics of players – particularly when the antics center on selling a product.

    “The issue is that players are specifically prohibited under our policies from wearing, displaying, promoting or otherwise conveying their support of a commercially identified product during a game while they’re on the field,” Aiello said. “Whether it’s rum or soft drinks or any other commercial product, that type of promotion is prohibited.”

    So that stance has killed the idea of striking a “Captain Morgan,” and left the brand and Gridiron greats looking for an alternative that would benefit both.

    “I don’t want people to think our intention was to [upset] the NFL,” Lehrman said. “We want to find a way to do it, but it’s not going to work out as currently formulated. … It’s at the point where we need to re-think how we can go about doing this and find a way that we can raise money for [Gridiron Greats] without getting people upset.”
     
  2. Sydalish

    Sydalish Addicted to Sports

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    Shame on the NFL?

    Shame on Captain Morgan.

    They knew legally they couldn't get away with outright paying athletes to basically advertise their products while playing football - so they found a loophole and tried to exploit it. The NFL even if they weren't the money hungry monsters we know them to be are in an awkward position now - if you let Captain Morgan get away with it, then others will try and in the spirit of all ad campaigns they will get more and more bold... and one thing I don't EVER want to see during a live football game are the players not focused on football but trying to do live commercials :p

    You have to nip **** like this in the bud IMMEDIATELY to prevent problems. And if you're really upset that the ex-NFL players won't be getting some $$ as a result of the campaign being pulled ask yourself this... why isn't Celek doing a regular ad for Captain Morgans with his earnings going to said charity? Because that wasn't the real purpose - the only reason money was being given to the charity was to help make shady advertising excusable.

    That's some messed up stuff right there. :no:
     
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  3. Pointyearedog

    Pointyearedog I only put idiots on ignore...

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    I am glad they cut these idiots off like that. Bad enough there's one Ochocinco doing dingbat impersonations and such, can you imagine every name receiver and running back striking poses after every touchdown? And then what, every cornerback that picks six also has a right to do the "Captain" pose? And dare I say it, the kickers after every extra point or field goal??!! Good riddance!
    Besides, I'm more of a "Sailor Jerry" rum drinker myself...

    Pointy :icon_twisted:
     
  4. BeerGuy

    BeerGuy BoltTalker

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    Sailor Jerry........that's not so good........

    If you want good flavored rum seek out Brinleys, from St. Kitts.
     
  5. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Maybe I missed the point of the campaign?

    I thought the money was going to a charity not the players.


    :icon_shrug:
     
  6. SDRaiderH8er

    SDRaiderH8er Well-Known Member

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    The NFL buckles under pressure from any group anymore. MADD would have had a field day with them. Plus it was free advertising.
     
  7. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    the nfl needs to get it's head out of the sand. They could have really done something good here. Maybe the Captain Morgan people could have handled it better, but it seemed like a worthy cause, and what the heck, kinda fun.

    oh, but the nfl isn't suppose to be fun
     
  8. SDRaiderH8er

    SDRaiderH8er Well-Known Member

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    Anheuser-Busch, Coors and Miller pay way too much money in advertising too let something like that go un noticed.
     
  9. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Totally agree except on the surface it looked like they were trying to do a GOOD thing
     
  10. boltssbbound

    boltssbbound Well-Known Member

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    I don't understand why people are bashing the NFL. It's not like Captain Morgan went to the NFL and was denied the right. They attempted to circumvent the rules and got caught. Captain Morgan was not doing this out of some sense of philanthropy. They were trying to get some cheap advertising. The NFL did what they had to do. If they had allowed Captain Morgan to get away with this, pretty soon every company would be adopting the same tactic and the NFL would lose out on tons of advertising revenue.
     
  11. WonderSlug

    WonderSlug Well-Known Member

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    If Captain Morgan was truly, altruistically, interested in helping ex-NFL players, they can still make the contributions, sans this weak advertising move. A million or two should do it.

    Don't try to make Captain Morgan out to be saints or anything.
     
  12. Sydalish

    Sydalish Addicted to Sports

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    Bingo :tup:
     
  13. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    they were going to give $$$ to the charity. how is that free?

    I agree that CM could have handled it better. It sounded to me like it was for a good cause and yes, some free advertising.

    what's so bad about that?
     
  14. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    I guess.
     
  15. Enormo

    Enormo BoltTalker

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    I agree selling more spiced rum is a worthy cause.
     
  16. Enormo

    Enormo BoltTalker

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    What???? You mean a global multi-million dollar corporation that sells alchohol is not in it to help people, simply out of the goodness of their corporate hearts????

    I've met some jaded folks in the past but you, Sir, have a particularly sickening jaundice view of the world!

    Good day, Sir!

    I SAID, "GOOD DAY!!!!"
     
  17. boltssbbound

    boltssbbound Well-Known Member

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    What's so wrong about that is that they were attempting to circumvent the rules. If they wanted to donate the money to charity, great. But what they wanted to do was advertise during NFL games without having to pay the going rate. If Captain Morgan wants to donate to charity, great. If they want to advertise during NFL games, that's fine too. But they need to do it within the rules.
     
  18. boltssbbound

    boltssbbound Well-Known Member

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    They were not trying to do a good thing. They were trying to circumvent the rules by donating money to a players' charity instead of paying players. A good thing would be to make a deal with the NFL to donate the money without trying to circumvent the rules. Essentially, they were trying to advertise during the NFL games without paying the going rate.
     
  19. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    they were GOING to do a good thing. But you're right. Rules are rules.

    :tup:
     
  20. Ray Dahayder

    Ray Dahayder BoltTalker

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    I usually don't agree with much the NFL does, but this is the absolute correct move. The fact that the rum company was supposedly giving the money to the NFL retired players fund, or something like that, only masks the fact that they were doing it strictly for cheap, and effective, advertising. It was devious and, while I have to give somebody some pat on the back for creative thinking, it's akin to hiring a sky diver to plummet into some public event just to get recognition. It works, but is it ethical? Next thing you know, every company has guys out there doing some sort of "Coke dance" or "McDonald's shake" after every tackle or catch. I'd have fined the player a huge amount even for that first offense. I think this is WAAAAAAAY worse that the Ocho dollar bribe joke. I'm not an Ocho fan, but I thought that was just funny.... laugh, tell him not to do it anymore and turn the page on that one. That was just fun.... he wasn't even making himself out to be the 'star' on that joke.

    Anyway, I'd bet the fine would be at least $100,000 next time this happens with the advertising pose.
     
  21. Ray Dahayder

    Ray Dahayder BoltTalker

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    I don't buy the "doing a good thing" with the money. That's all a candy coated cover for what they really are after. YOUR dollars. Just like when a company says they'll donate "x" amount of money from every item that you purchase from them. Well, that makes you think they're doing some noble service, when actually they're using that "good deed" to get more of your business dollars. It's a scam. If any company really wanted to do some good deed, they'd donate the money without asking for you to buy their stuff.

    It's all just a good looking scam. Make them think I'm taking their money for a good cause..... In fact, if I were an NFL official, I'd look into legal action against that rum company. THAT'S how despicable I think that was.
     
  22. Ray Dahayder

    Ray Dahayder BoltTalker

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    bottom line, they knew that they'd get busted, they had a good excuse for doing it (player's fund) so nobody would think they were "all bad", and after they got busted, they knew that the fall out publicity would do the same thing for them that wanted to do all along. Get their brand recognized and talked about.

    Bingo. It worked. And it was devious. I won't buy their ****** rum now. How about that? It backfired with me, you slimey scum bags.
     
  23. HollywoodLeo

    HollywoodLeo Well-Known Member

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    Is that better than Bacardi? (the rum I usually drink)
     
  24. HollywoodLeo

    HollywoodLeo Well-Known Member

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    You mean a business is trying to sell their product? GET OUT! How dare they!!!

    I'd rather give business to a company that donates to a charity for every purchase than one that does not.

    Who cares if their real motivation is to sell their products...that's the motivation of any business. People don't go into business to not sell their products.
     
  25. scottbbo1

    scottbbo1 BoltTalker

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    Personally I think it hilarious. CM was just trying to get some promotion..it's business, no need to villify. although I am glad they put a stop to it. I mean, where would it end? what would the celebration be for the guy being paid by Viagra or Cialis? :icon_banana:
     
  26. boltssbbound

    boltssbbound Well-Known Member

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    Well, from a business standpoint, the NFL had no choice. The NFL makes most of its money through selling the TV rights to its games to the networks. The networks, in turn, make money by selling commercial time to corporations to advertise during the highly viewed NFL games. If companies were allowed to advertise their products during games without paying for the privilege, it would destroy the entire business model. In fact, if the NFL had allowed this player conduct to continue they'd probably be sued by the networks.
     
  27. HollywoodLeo

    HollywoodLeo Well-Known Member

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    Exactly.

    I don't fault Captain Morgan for trying to do it and I don't fault the NFL for putting a stop to it.

    It's all about trying to earn and maintain a profit.

    Crazy concept, I know, but businesses like to maintain a profit.
     
  28. CoronaDoug

    CoronaDoug Well-Known Member

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    I am going to do you a favor here and tell you that Bacardi is crap compared to Cruzan. http://cruzanrum.com/
     
  29. HollywoodLeo

    HollywoodLeo Well-Known Member

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    Says the guy who's handle is named after a beer that needs a lime chaser to make it tollerable. :icon_tease:

    (I may check out Cruzan. I'm only recently getting into my rum kick. I'm normally a vodka and Whiskey guy.)
     
  30. CoronaDoug

    CoronaDoug Well-Known Member

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    I have to admit that Corona is piss water unless a lime is added. Then it is heavenly! :lol:

    Seriously if you are a rum lover the Cruzan is it. I like light (clear) rum and I will also consume the coconut rum. I have tried Malibu, Parrot Bay, and all others but Cruzan has the best coconut rum. I am not really a dark rum drinker but I can also recommend Tommy Bahama light (clear) Rum. http://www.tommybahamarum.com/
    I also hear that Jimmy has some rum coming out soon. http://www.margaritavillerum.com I hope it is better than his tequila! :lol:
     

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