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Lose-lose finale to Jackson-Chargers standoff

Discussion in 'Chargers Fan Forum' started by DenverBolt67, Oct 22, 2010.

  1. DenverBolt67

    DenverBolt67 BoltTalker

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    Lose-lose finale to Jackson-Chargers standoff - NFL - Yahoo! Sports

    The winner in the great contract standoff between the San Diego Chargers and wide receiver Vincent Jackson(notes) was … no one. Welcome to the lose-lose situation.

    With the announcement by agent Neil Schwartz that Jackson will show up next Friday, just in time for Jackson to serve three games on the roster exemption list and get six games on the roster toward an accrued season and unrestricted free agency, there was the usual torrent of opinion.

    Many fans hammered Jackson for staying away from the team for so long, calling him a traitor, selfish or some variation of both. Others ripped into Chargers general manager A.J. Smith, the architect of a 2-4 season so far. That record looks to get worse with games coming up against New England, Tennessee and Houston over the next three weeks. Throw in a game against Denver on Nov. 22, and the Chargers could easily be 3-7 by the time Jackson is technically ready to play.

    I say “technically” because don’t think for a second that Jackson is going to have his timing down with quarterback Philip Rivers(notes) by that first game (Nov. 28 at Indianapolis).

    But the bigger point in all of this is that both Jackson and the Chargers (and ultimately Smith, if this season continues to unfold as it has so far) got hurt by this whole stare down.

    In fact, Jackson may get hurt the least in the long run, as long as he doesn’t get injured. In the short run, however, Jackson took a beating. He will play for just more than $240,000 the rest of the season (he gets paid a prorated share of $583,000, including a paycheck for the upcoming bye week). He lost a lot of money this season. His one-year tender was more than $3.2 million if he had signed before June 15, although that amount was not worth playing for based on what wide receivers such as Roddy White(notes), Roy Williams, Brandon Marshall(notes) and Lee Evans(notes) have received in recent years.

    Now, Jackson may have to play in six games, taking great risk for just pennies on the many dollars he could have gotten.

    In the long run, however, Jackson is probably going to be OK. There are some minor questions he’ll have to answer for other teams about his holdout and two past charges of driving-under-the-influence of alcohol. That said, enough teams have already expressed enough interest during the contract standoff that Jackson is going to get paid serious money this offseason. Expect a five-year deal worth an average of at least $9.5 million per year, pending he is healthy.

    As for the Chargers, they can trumpet the fact that they stood their ground against a player. Smith can use that in future contract negotiations with other players and agents, showing that he’s a man of his word. In fact, lots of fans, who for whatever reason hate to see players get paid a lot of money, love this “get tough” policy.

    Unfortunately for the Chargers and Smith, fans like winning a lot more than they like seeing their team save a few million dollars.

    But here are two other problems with that approach:

    First, Smith and the Chargers could be facing a lot of heat if, as mentioned, this season continues as is. San Diego’s slow start is a stunning disappointment so far. In a weak AFC West, the Chargers are still in contention, but this is not how it was supposed to go. This team should have cruised to a division title, not scratch for one.

    Worse, former Chargers are dominating right now. In New York, cornerback Antonio Cromartie(notes) and running back LaDainian Tomlinson(notes) are dominating, leading the Jets to a 5-1 start. The Chargers discarded both players this offseason. Tomlinson and Smith had become bitter with one another. As for Cromartie, the Chargers had all sorts of problems with him after they started fining him for every transgression.

    Furthermore, New Orleans quarterback Drew Brees(notes) is coming off a Super Bowl title. While the Chargers have Rivers now, they don’t have that ring and they got nothing in direct return for Brees, who was allowed to leave as a free agent when he had a shoulder injury.

    Throw in running back Michael Turner(notes) playing well in Atlanta after fleeing as a free agent and special teams ace Kassim Osgood(notes) leaving via free agency (and leaving the Chargers special teams in shambles), and suddenly you have a lot of circumstances where fans start to wonder about Smith.

    Fair or not, that’s the way it goes.

    Second, while Smith obviously wanted to show bargaining consistency, the reality is that this situation is probably never going to come up again. Yes, NEVER.

    What fans fail (or just don’t want) to understand is that Jackson was a victim of rare circumstances. He was a member of the last draft class (2005) that allowed players selected in the second round or lower to sign a five-year contract, rather than the current four-year maximum. Under the current rules, Jackson should have been an unrestricted free agent before the 2009 season. Instead, Jackson not only was hampered that way, but also he was a victim of the change to the collective bargaining agreement that occurred before this season that made it so that players had to have six accrued seasons to reach unrestricted free agency.

    Welcome to double jeopardy, NFL style.

    Assuming that there is eventually an extension of the CBA (it will happen some day), there is no way that the NFL Players Association would ever agree to a system that maintains six years before free agency. Furthermore, the owners wouldn’t even be so absurd to ask for that.

    In other words, Smith and the Chargers are never going to have a player in Jackson’s circumstance again, a guy who played exceptionally well in his fourth and fifth seasons after taking years to develop and thinking he deserved fair market value.

    Heck, under normal circumstances, the Chargers probably would have had to make a decision to extend Jackson before his January 2009 arrest – his second – for driving under the influence. That’s just how strange this odyssey has been.

    What people fail to see is that this was a unique situation and deserved a unique approach for a solution. That would have been best for all involved.

    It has been clear for months that the Chargers never had any intention of signing Jackson to a long-term contract. At the same time, the Chargers needed Jackson. They admitted that by trading for Patrick Crayton(notes) before the season (a move that had a damaging ripple effect on the special teams).

    If that was the situation, the Chargers would have been wise to make Jackson a one-year, $6 million offer for the season, promising Jackson they wouldn’t franchise him after the year. That’s essentially the deal Jackson agreed to take from Minnesota when the Vikings tried to trade for him twice earlier this season.

    That trade could have given Smith a second-round pick and a conditional fourth or fifth rounder in 2011. Instead, now he’ll be lucky to get a compensatory pick at the end of the third round in 2012.

    Again, that’s just another example of how everybody lost in this one.
     
  2. CoronaDoug

    CoronaDoug Well-Known Member

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    “When I heard all of this, I became very sad. I am very thankful that I had a great support group help me get through that traumatic experience. I’m better now, and thank you for asking.”
     
  3. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    This moron writer does not think it through. He never mentions the likely possibility VJ is franchised tagged next year. That is $11 million reasons how everyone will win (given VJ plays like a f-tagged player)
     
  4. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    AJ is da chit. I busted up laughing after reading that little oratory masterpiece.
     
  5. CoronaDoug

    CoronaDoug Well-Known Member

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    Tag and trade!
     
  6. 65TossPowerTrap

    65TossPowerTrap BoltTalker

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    I expect Jackson to have several "nagging injuries" keeping him out of games when he returns. He has no incentive to play. The teams that will be courting him already know what he can do and his agents will assure them that his "caution" is simply to ensure he is at top performance (for his new team) next season.
     
  7. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    That is another scenario which could happen and everyone would likely win.

    Writers are drama queens (I know no kidding).
     
  8. DenverBolt67

    DenverBolt67 BoltTalker

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    So you think AJ will give VJ $11 mil next year after refusing to give him anything more than a little over $3 this year?
     
  9. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    Sure he does.

    He is playing for the NFL next year and this year. VJ could get a MCNeill deal if he behaves (although unlikely).

    VJ is not Merriman who was sand bagging with phantom injuries.
     
  10. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    Yup.

    AJ wants VJ. That much is obvious but on the Chargers terms which makes it seem like they do not want VJ because no long term contract has been offered.

    VJ will get F-Tagged. Bank it.
     
  11. DenverBolt67

    DenverBolt67 BoltTalker

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    Not if AJ demands two 1st round picks like he did with Brees and Turner when he tagged them. I doubt anyone even gives him a 2nd and 3rd, and I also expect VJ to refuse to sign the franchise tender until the very last min. So they can't trade him once again until he signs the tender. And unless a team can get him into training camp so he has all off season to learn the new system, I doubt they pay a ton to get him
     
  12. CoronaDoug

    CoronaDoug Well-Known Member

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    Plus it could possibly buy us time to get that extra draft pick for him. If he wants out of SD that badly then his agents may work a little harder to get us that compensation.
     
  13. DenverBolt67

    DenverBolt67 BoltTalker

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    Then it will just prove the egomaniac tag AJ has
     
  14. CoronaDoug

    CoronaDoug Well-Known Member

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    Let's say we get the same offer after the Tag that we would have received a few months back. AJ still wins. We rented VJ for 260k or so this season and we still get the draft picks. VJ will sign anything to get the F out of here.
     
  15. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    It is business and has nothing to do with ego. That is a cop out excuse. This is pure hard core business.
     
  16. DenverBolt67

    DenverBolt67 BoltTalker

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    Maybe. Time will tell. But I have my doubts
     
  17. 65TossPowerTrap

    65TossPowerTrap BoltTalker

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    He has every incentive to become Merriman (more than Merriman did TBH) and really no significant incentive to play. The teams that want him already want him, and aren't going to be the least bit concerned about him sand bagging it the remainder of the year (in fact, they'd likely all want it that way).

    I mean it's pretty simple for VJax. No matter how much of a competitor he is, if he gets hurt, he loses it all. If he plays, he gets $240,000 and doesn't improve his stock in any significant way.

    What incentive is there to play?
     
  18. boltsnow

    boltsnow BoltTalker

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    Not neccessarily. AJ has done everything so far within the rules of the game. Many may not agree with what he did but it was his right to do so. It appears that AJ may have a plan and to go off track of that plan it would have cost a 2 & 3. These boards are gonna be crazy until VJ signs with his next team. All the what ifs/why's/how comes/why not's......it's a fricken roller coaster.
    You have to believe that AJ has some kind of plan up his sleave as to why he is doing what he is doing and I'm sure all of the other GM's know it also. It's just the fans that haven't a clue and that includes you, me & everyone else that puts any time into following the Chargers. :lol:
     
  19. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    AJ wont pay VJ a bloody dime next year!

    Cause there will be a lockout... :lol:
     
  20. boltsnow

    boltsnow BoltTalker

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    Don't be hating on me folks but I have to agree with this. TEams already know what VJ can do, like I said in previous posts, he isn't coming back from an injury or anything serious like that. What skills does he have to prove himself on? If teams are high on him they are going to dish out the money. what he does from here on out I seriously on't think will make a difference. If his stock his hurt in anyway, it has already been damaged by him sitting out. what he does from here on out will mean nothing.
     
  21. CoronaDoug

    CoronaDoug Well-Known Member

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    "By Jackson and Mankins earning a sixth accrued season, the only way the Chargers and Patriots can restrict their free agency in 2011 would be to place a franchise tag on them next February at a considerably higher guaranteed value than the restricted contract tenders. A transition tag also would be available for the Chargers and Patriots instead of the franchise tag, but the teams would not receive any draft pick compensation and would have only right of first refusal on any contract the players signed with another team."
    Sources: Vincent Jackson, Logan Mankins to report to Chargers, Patriots on advice of National Football Players Association - ESPN

    Transition tag - If another club offers a contract to a transitioned player, his original club has seven days to decide whether the original club will match that offer or not. If the original club agrees to match, the player is forced to sign with the original club at the terms agreed to in the offer by the other club. If the original club declines to match, the player signs with the other team, and the original team is offered no compensation, as they would be if the player had received the franchise tag.

    Let us not forget about this tag. AJ can tell VJ's agents to go get your best deal. Now if he sandbags it he may not get the highest offer. AJ then can match it and VJ has to sign. Now enter the "poison pill" that could be placed in the contract.
     
  22. CoronaDoug

    CoronaDoug Well-Known Member

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    No hating here. This has also crossed my mind.
     
  23. 65TossPowerTrap

    65TossPowerTrap BoltTalker

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    I fully admit this may also be some wishful thinking on my part (though I think it makes sense too). I mean, a healthy Jackson probably means the Chargers win that Monday Night Football game. We wouldn't have been able to double/triple team gates all night.
     
  24. MasterOfPuppets

    MasterOfPuppets Charger fan since 1979

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    two words : poison pill. Don't think VJ's agents wouldn't make sure the contract included one
     
  25. MasterOfPuppets

    MasterOfPuppets Charger fan since 1979

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    VJ was suspended for the first 3 weeks of the season, under contract or not
     
  26. boltsnow

    boltsnow BoltTalker

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    Such as what? What would be a thorn in the side to the Bolts but not another team?
     
  27. 65TossPowerTrap

    65TossPowerTrap BoltTalker

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    I understand this. What I am saying is, he is an impact player, and he could be on the field for our second game. So, yeah, there is some hope on my part that he is either not there or not "there." lol
     
  28. MasterOfPuppets

    MasterOfPuppets Charger fan since 1979

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    well, didn't the vikes put a poison pill in Steve Hutchinson's contract that stated something like if he plays 4 games in the state of washington then he gets a huge bonus or something like that?
     
  29. CoronaDoug

    CoronaDoug Well-Known Member

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    The transition tag is currently at the center of a controversy regarding its potential usefulness in light of the contract offered by the Minnesota Vikings to Steve Hutchinson, an offensive guard who had received the transition tag following the 2005 season from the Seattle Seahawks. The contract was for $49 million over seven years, $16 million of which was guaranteed. However, the Vikings added a "poison pill": The entire $49 million contract was guaranteed if Hutchinson were not the highest paid offensive linemen on the team he signed with. Since Hutchinson's salary was less than that of the Seahawks' Walter Jones, an offensive tackle, his contract would have been guaranteed by the Seahawks, while the Vikings, having no offensive linemen averaging more than Hutchinson's proposed salary, would only be obligated to pay the guaranteed $16 million. The Seahawks filed a grievance with the NFL league office, claiming that the poison pill was illegal under the collective bargaining agreement in that the Seahawks would have to pay significantly more than the Vikings despite matching with exactly the same contract. An arbitrator ruled in favor of the Vikings, and the Seahawks were essentially unable to match and received no compensation.
    In an act of apparent revenge, the Seattle Seahawks included their own "poison pills" when signing restricted free agent wide receiver Nate Burleson. The total contract was seven years and $49 million - not coincidentally the exact amount of the contract Hutchinson received from the Vikings. The first poison pill stipulated that the entire contract would be guaranteed if Burleson played five or more games in the state of Minnesota during any year of the contract. This of course would be impossible as a member of the Seahawks, but an inevitability as a member of the Vikings, who play their home games in the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in Minnesota. The second provision would guarantee the full contract if Burleson is paid more on average per year than all of his team's running backs combined. At the time of his signing, the averages of the Vikings' tailbacks fell well shy of the $7 million average of the Burleson offer sheet. However in Seattle, running back Shaun Alexander alone made an average of over $7 million per year.

    Transition tag - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  30. MasterOfPuppets

    MasterOfPuppets Charger fan since 1979

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    yeah, this is what I meant :icon_tease:
     

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