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Memorial Day thread

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by BFISA, May 27, 2007.

  1. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  2. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    • Like Like x 1
  3. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Two pilots from Texas come home-

    Aug. 3, 2007, 5:27PM
    MIA Air Force officers from Pampa, Dallas ID'd

    C 2007 The Associated Press

    WASHINGTON - The remains of two Air Force officers from Texas - missing in
    action since 1971 in Vietnam - have been recovered and identified, the
    Defense Department said Friday.

    Lt. Col. James H. Ayres of Pampa will be buried Aug. 10 in Pampa. Burial
    arrangements are pending for Lt. Col. Charles W. Stratton of Dallas.

    The men's airplane disappeared during a nighttime strike mission to Laos.
    Just after they began the target run, the crew of another plane saw a large
    explosion. Rescue and search efforts were not possible because of hostile
    activity in the area, the Defense Department said.

    In 2001, a joint U.S. and Lao People's Democratic Republic team interviewed
    Laotian citizens about crash sites. One man led officials to an area
    believed to be the Ayres and Stratton crash site.

    Human remains and crew items were found during several years of recovery
    efforts.

    DNA helped identify the Texans.

    ___

    On the Net:

    http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo
     
  4. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Poached from mil.com-

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or national guard or reserve - is someone who, at one point in his/her life, wrote a blank check made payable to "The United States of America", for an amount of "up to and including my life."
     
  5. TheLash

    TheLash Well-Known Member

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    You're a good man BFISA.

    If I'd felt the way I did about things post 911 back when I was in high school I might have taken that opportunity to go to west point.:unsure:
     
  6. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Thanx.

    That quote kinda hit me where I live.
     
  7. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Still bringin'em home - :icon_sad:

    06:21 PM CDT on Monday, August 6, 2007

    Associated Press

    SAN ANTONIO - The remains of five soldiers, including one Texan, who went missing in action after a 1968 helicopter crash during the Vietnam War have been recovered.

    The U.S. Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office said late last week that Sgt. 1st Class Ernest F. Briggs Jr., of San Antonio, was among those whose remains were identified.

    Others were Chief Warrant Officer Dennis C. Hamilton, of Barnes City, Iowa; Chief Warrant Officer Sheldon D. Schultz, of Altoona, Pa.; and Sgt. 1st Class James D. Williamson of Olympia, Wash.

    The group remains of the crew will be buried with full military honors on Aug. 14 at Arlington National Cemetery outside Washington, D.C.

    The remains of Sgt. 1st Class John T. Gallagher of Hamden, Conn., were individually identified and a burial date is to be set by his family, the personnel office said.

    The men crewed a UH-1D helicopter on Jan. 5, 1968. As they patrolled Laos and approached a landing zone, it was hit by enemy fire. After the crash attempts to reach the site were stopped by enemy fire.

    The Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command led the effort to identify the remains and conducted several investigations, including interviews with witnesses to the crash. The accounting command led three excavations of the crash site and recovered remains as well as identification tags for Briggs, Hamilton and Schultz.
     
  8. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  9. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  10. o-line protagonist

    o-line protagonist BoltTalker

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    Thanks for that one BFISA, as a former serviceman myself, that kind of thing serves as a constant reminder that not only are our service men and women still fighting for their country, but helping folks out like this young man in this sad story. Life is weird though at times, he could pull out of it somehow.:flag: :bolt:
     
  11. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    :tup: :flag:
     
  12. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    An email from a friend of mine-

    Folks,
    I want to share a story with you that began in Vietnam two generations ago.

    An Army nurse named Maureen Robinson had occasion to treat a little Montagnard boy, whom she eventually adopted and brought home to America (full story at: http://www.gia-vuc.com/ICTZ/dinh nit/adoption.htm )

    Since then, that Montagnard American boy, Mark Robinson, has grown into a man and now has children of his own. One of them, now ten years old and named Stephen Robinson, has proven to be a budding musical genius. If you don't believe me, just view the attached movie of him (with his kid brother singing backup) singing the song he composed after seeing a Blue Angels flying demonstration.

    He is now in an on-line talent contest, and I would like for you to go to http://www.usatvbroadcast.com/ and vote for him.

    To the right of the yellow "voting now" column you will see four rows of video labels. The next-to-last name under the fourth row is "Stephen Robinson". Just click on his name to cast your vote. You may vote as often as you wish, so please vote and vote often!

    His grandmother and I greatly appreciate it.

    Bucky
     
  13. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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  14. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    You Would Never Have Guessed

    Captain Kangaroo passed away on January 23, 2004 as age 76 , which is odd, because he always looked to be 76. (DOB: 6/27/27 ) His death reminded me of the following story.

    Some people have been a bit offended that the actor, Lee Marvin, is buried in a grave alongside 3- and 4-star generals at Arlington National Cemetery . His marker gives his name, rank (PVT) and service (USMC). Nothing else. Here's a guy who was only a famous movie star who served his time, why the heck does he rate burial with these guys? Well, following is the amazing answer:

    I always liked Lee Marvin, but didn't know the extent of his Corps experiences.




    [​IMG]




    In a time when many Hollywood stars served their country in the armed forces often in rear echelon posts where they were carefully protected, only to be trotted out to perform for the cameras in war bond promotions, Lee Marvin was a genuine hero. He won the Navy Cross at Iwo Jima . There is only one higher Naval award... the Medal Of Honor!


    [​IMG]



    If that is a surprising comment on the true character of the man, he credits his sergeant with an even greater show of bravery.

    Dialog from "The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson": His guest was Lee Marvin Johnny said, "Lee, I'll bet a lot of people are unaware that you were a Marine in the initial landing at Iwo Jima .and that during the course of that action you earned the Navy Cross and were severely wounded."


    [​IMG]



    "Yeah, yeah... I got shot square in the bottom and they gave me the Cross for securing a hot spot about halfway up Suribachi. Bad thing about getting shot up on a mountain is guys getting' shot hauling you down. But,Johnny, at Iwo I served under the bravest man I ever knew... We both got the Cross the same day, but what he did for his Cross made mine look cheap in comparison. That dumb guy actually stood up on Red beach and directed his troops to move forward and get the hell off the beach. Bullets flying by, with mortar rounds landing everywhere and he stood there as the main target of gunfire so that he could get his men to safety. He did this on more than one occasion because his men's safety was more important than his own life.

    That Sergeant and I have been lifelong friends. When they brought me off Suribachi we passed the Sergeant and he lit a smoke and passed it to me, lying on my belly on the litter and said, "Where'd they get you Lee?" "Well Bob... if you make it home before me, tell Mom to sell the outhouse!"

    Johnny, I'm not lying, Sergeant Keeshan was the bravest man I ever knew.
    The Sergeant's name is Bob Keeshan. You and the world know him as Captain Kangaroo."

    [​IMG]


    On another note, there was this wimpy little man (who just passed away) on PBS, gentle and quiet. Mr. Rogers is another of those you would least suspect of being anything but what he now portrays to our youth. But Mr. Rogers was a U.S. Navy Seal, combat-proven in Vietnam with over twenty-five confirmed kills to his name. He wore a long-sleeved sweater on TV, to cover the many tattoos on his forearm and biceps. He was a master in small arms and hand-to-hand combat, able to disarm or kill in a heartbeat



    [​IMG]



    After the war Mr. Rogers became an ordained Presbyterian minister and therefore a pacifist. Vowing to never harm another human and also dedicating the rest of his life to trying to help lead children on the right path in life. He hid away the tattoos and his past life and won our hearts with his quiet wit and charm.


    America's real heroes don't flaunt what they did; they quietly go about their day-to-day lives, doing what they do best. They earned our respect and the freedoms that we all enjoy.
    Look around and see if you can find one of those heroes in your midst.
    Often, they are the ones you'd least suspect, but would most like to have on your side if anything ever happened.


    Take the time to thank anyone that has fought for our freedom. With encouragement they could be the next Captain Kangaroo or Mr.Rogers
     
  15. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
    Caveats: NONE




    James B. Clark
    HQ, First Army, G-7
    Phone:
    DSN:
    email: james.b.clark1@us.army.mil
    sipr: james.clark@first.army.smil.mil
    -----Original Message-----
    From: Longest, Elaine S., CIV, First Army HQ, DCS, G-5
    Sent: Friday, August 31, :47 PM
    Subject: Fridays at the Pentagon (UNCLASSIFIED)

    Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
    Caveats: NONE



    Fridays at the Pentagon

    If you think you know the strength of the bonds between our military men and women, read this. Your media won't tell you the story.

    This week, I'm turning my space over to a good friend and former roommate, Army Lt. Col. Robert Bateman, who recently completed a year long tour of duty in Iraq and is now back at the Pentagon.

    Here's Lt. Col. Bateman's account of a little-known ceremony that fills the halls of the Army corridor of the Pentagon with cheers, applause and many tears every Friday morning. It first appeared on May
    17 on the Weblog of media critic and pundit Eric Alterman at the Media Matters for America Web site.

    "It is 110 yards from the "E" ring to the "A" ring of the Pentagon. This section of the Pentagon is newly renovated; the floors
    shine, the hallway is broad, and the lighting is bright! At this instant the entire length of the corridor is packed with officers, a few
    sergeants and some civilians, all crammed tightly three and four deep against the walls. There are thousands here.

    "This hallway, more than any other, is the `Army' hallway. The G3 offices line one side, G2 the other, G8 is around the corner All
    Army. Moderate conversations flow in a low buzz. Friends, who may not have seen each other for a few weeks, or a few years, spot each other, cross the way and renew. Everyone shifts to ensure an open path remains down the center. The air conditioning system was not designed for this
    press of bodies in this area.

    The temperature is rising already. Nobody cares. "10:36 hours: The clapping starts at the E-Ring. That is the outermost of the five
    rings of the Pentagon and it is closest to the entrance to the building. This clapping is low, sustained, hearty. It is applause with a deep emotion behind it as it moves forward in a wave down the length of the hallway. "A steady rolling wave of sound it is, moving at the pace of the soldier in the wheelchair who marks the forward edge with his presence. He is the first. He is missing the greater part of one leg, and some of his wounds are still suppurating. By his age I expect that he is a private, or perhaps a private first class.

    "Captains, majors, lieutenant colonels and colonels meet his gaze and nod as they applaud, soldier to soldier. Three years ago when I described one of these events, those lining the hallways were somewhat
    different. The applause a little wilder, perhaps in private guilt for not having shared in the burden .. yet. "Now almost everyone lining the hallway is, like the man in the wheelchair, also a combat veteran. This
    steadies the applause, but I think deepens the sentiment. We have all been there now. The soldier's chair is pushed by, I believe, a full colonel.

    "Behind him, and stretching the length from Rings E to A, come more of his peers, each private, corporal, or sergeant assisted as need be by a field grade officer. 11:00 hours: Twenty-four minutes of steady
    applause. My hands hurt, and I laugh to myself at how stupid that sounds in my own head. `My hands hurt.' Christ. Shut up and clap. For twenty-four minutes, soldier after soldier has come down this hallway - 20, 25, 30. Fifty-three legs come with them, and perhaps only 52 hands or arms, but down this hall came 30 solid hearts."

    They pass down this corridor of officers and applause, and then meet for a private lunch, at which they are the guests of honor, hosted by the generals. Some are wheeled along. Some insist upon getting out of
    their chairs, to march as best they can with their chin held up, down his hallway, through this most unique audience. Some are catching handshakes and smiling like a politician at a Fourth of July parade. More than a couple of them seem amazed and are smiling shyly.

    "There are families with them as well: the 18-year-old war-bride pushing her 19-year-old husband's wheelchair and not quite understanding why her husband is so affected by this, the boy she grew up with, now a man, who had never shed a tear is crying; the older immigrant Latino parents who have, perhaps more than their wounded mid-20s son, an appreciation for the emotion given on their son's behalf. No man in that
    hallway, walking or clapping, is ashamed by the silent tears on more than a few cheeks. An Airborne Ranger wipes his eyes only to better see. A couple of the officers in this crowd have themselves been a part of
    this parade in the past.

    "These are our men, broken in body they may be, but they are our brothers, and we welcome them home. This parade has gone on, every single Friday, all year long, for more than four years." Did you know that? The media hasn't told the story.

    Regards, John
    Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
    Caveats: NONE

    Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
    Caveats: NONE
     
  16. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    I belong to an email list of over 600 of my Brothers from Special Forces. The past cuppola days the discussions have centered around celebrities, i.e. MLB players and actors who have served in combat, or was in the military during wartime.

    These are somma the responses-

    According to the below link. Robert Mitchum was drafted in 1945 and served as a medic at an induction center. He was honorably discharged when the war ended.

    Ron D

    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000053/bio
     
  17. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    This about Jimi Hendrix-

    Gents
    DOB 11/27/42.
    From on line bio:

    <At the age of 16, Jimi was thrown out of school -apparently for holding the hand of a white girl in class - and he played rock'n'roll in teenage bands before voluntarily joining the army at 17.

    After 14 months as a paratrooper, learning a lot about falling and flying, he suffered an injury and was discharged. He decided to enter the music field.>

    ts
     
  18. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    'Nuther about WWII-era MLB players-

    Cecil Travis, Bob Feller, Lou Brissie, Dom DiMaggio, Johnny Pesky, Ted Williams and a host of other ball players served during the wars...though, I don't think these men got the special treatment that the Hollywood types did.

    Mark
     
  19. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    What about Spahnie??

    For All

    Warren Spahn was awarded a Bronze Star for Valor in the Combat Engineers during WW2 and later received a battlefield commission.

    Randy C
     
  20. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Guys,


    I put this on before but some of you might have missed it.

    Q. Who signed Clark Gable's discharge paperwork?
    <
    <
    <
    <
    <
    <
    <
    <
    <

    A. Captain Ronald Reagan
    ***********************************************************
    Bill C
     
  21. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    hognose writes:
    most of the actors and other Hollyweird types who suited up for the war
    You missed a couple:
    David Niven, LTC, Royal Commandoes (Sandhurst Grad, Argylle and Sutherlands before Hollywood)

    Douglas Fairbanks Jr, Navy Commander, worked the Med with Special Boat Squadrons infil/exfil Commandoes, working with Niven, unit commanded by John Buckeley, PT Boat guy that exfil MacArthur. Silver star retired a Captain, USNR

    Gene Autry - flew C-47s over the Hump, along the Aluminum trail

    Richard Burton - flew Typhoons for the RAF

    Jack Hawkins - Royal Artillery, with Monty

    James Arness - wounded at Anzio

    Peter Graves - Arness's brother also wounded at Anzio

    James Whitmore - Marine GunnerySergeant Battlefield commission to CPT

    Robert Taylor (Spangler Arlington Baugh, real name) - Navy Destroyer - Picket line Okinawa

    Tyrone Power - snuck R4Ds (C47s) in and out of Guadalcanal

    Ronald Colman - Coldstream Guards - WWI

    Raymond Massey - Royal Canadians WWI

    Sterling Hayden - OSS Italy/Yugoslavia

    Richard Todd - British Airborne - Normandy

    Charlton Heston - Radio man B25

    Donald Pleasance (little guy that plays Nazis all the time) RAF Mosquito Pilot Recon Bird

    James Garner Medic Korea

    Neville Brand (ugly guy, in Tora, Tora Tora yells "You want confirmation" fifth most decorated Marine in WWII

    Eddie Albert - Silver star for bringing wounded off the beach at Tarawa

    Pat Buttram - tanker wounded twice

    Humphrey Bogart - Navy WWI, got his busted lip from an escaping prisoner, who he shot when he didn't halt

    Dan Blocker 45th Division Korea infantry SGT

    Richard Boone - aerial gunner Navy torpedo planes three years in the Pacific, Intrepid, Hancock, and Enterprise

    Walter Brennan Artillery WWI France from 1917 till end

    Charles Bronson Tail Gunner B-29s

    Art Carney - wounded at St Lo with 28th Infantry division while serving as machine gunner

    Johnny Carson - gunner officer USS Pennsylvania

    Tony Curtis - Navy - Submarines

    Kirk Douglas - Navy Sub Chaser

    Henry Fonda Navy Intel officer USS Essex - Pacific

    Glenn Ford - USMC WWII not overseas, tour in Vietnam, commanding combat cameramen

    Ed McMahan - USMC WWII and Korea pilot

    Robert Montgomery - USN Pacific - Destroyers

    Paul Newman USN radioman Navy TBMs off carriers

    Dan Rowan (Laugh In) P40 pilot in the Pacific

    Johnathan Winters - USMC

    If you look at the movie ranks with unbiased eye, a lot of actors volunteer by were unfit John Wayne was one, the walk came from a bad back, but the above are only a sampling of what some did. Probably like the rest of the population

    tobin
     
  22. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    >...Far back in my mind is a story where I read that John Wayne was classified 4F...<

    Guys,
    According to "Who2" an internet site listing biographies of famous people:
    Wayne did not serve in World War II; though he was within draft age (34) at the time of Pearl Harbor, he was eventually classified 3-A (deferred for family dependency -- Wayne had four children) and later 2-A (deferred in the national interest). The issue is a touchy one, and many of Wayne's fans insist that he was actually classified 4-F due to an old football knee injury, a bad ear, or a chronic back injury...
    Who2 can be found at: www.who2.com/johnwayne.html
    Regards,
    Big John
     
  23. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Rond wrote:

    According to the below link. Robert Mitchum was drafted in 1945 and served as a medic at an induction center. He was honorably discharged when the war ended.

    Ron D

    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000053/bio

    Has it really been 50 years since I saw Thunder Road at the drive in? "And there was thunder, thunder over Thunder Road" shoot everybody knew the song.
     
  24. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Randy C wrote-
    Warren Spahn was awarded a Bronze Star for Valor in the Combat Engineers during WW2 and later received a battlefield commission.


    When I was a kid, I used to like Warren Spahn - he was one of the few pitchers who could bat, and hit home runs.

    Mark
     
  25. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Has it really been 50 years since I saw Thunder Road at the drive in? "And there was thunder, thunder over Thunder Road" shoot veerybody knew the song.



    Thunder was his engine and white lightning was his load, and there was moon shine, moon shine to quench the devils thirst, the law they swore they'd get him but the devil got him first....

    Jim
     
  26. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    On Sept 26th is my birthday. A tradition that was established in my house is to watch the Duke in his last role; "The Shootist". I wore out my VHS tape and the boys bought me the DVD version. This came about when I was single, cir 1984 and have been watching this movie evry year on mu birthday. Why? In the movie, Duke sets the stage for his demise, on his birthday, taking out the bad guys (as usual), one of whom must have been tired of being retired by the Duke, Richard Boone. I will never forget his line to Lauren Bacall when he says that it is his birthday and he is going to the saloon for a drink.

    I know the script almost by heart and can recite at the same time. He had a credo; "I won't be wronged, I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to others and I expect the same in return."

    Jim in South GA
     
  27. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Jim W wrote:"A tradition that was established in my house is to
    watch the Duke in his last role; "The Shootist". ..."

    *********

    Oh, Lordee! Next thing you know we'll be doing "What films did John
    Wayne get dead in?" again.

    Reg, hoping I saved my list
     
  28. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Warren Spahn - he was one of the few pitchers who could bat
    And the man could lay down the finest bunts in the history of the game, I saw him lay two in one game against the Phillies when I was young. One down the first base line that was textbook, and the other a misdirection shot with English up the third base line that had the catcher running in circles ( of course in the 50s, that was normal for Philly players.)

    tobin
     
  29. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Mother/Guys,
    According to several local friends of mine who knew the Duke very well (he owned a **** pile of land as well as ranches around the Phoenix area as did Ben Johnson and several others), Wayne kept trying to enlist to do his
    part (as many on the SF List can verify he was very patriotic) but his final deferment came when they determined that he, along with several others, would do far more for the war effort by making patriotic movies and military training films. He accepted that alternative.

    A few other trivia notes from Ben Johnson and Harry Carey Jr. another close friend of Wayne. Yes, John had a bad back and a knee injured playing football during college. His trademark walk, however, was developed with the help of Harry Carey's father who assisted Wayne with developing his walk - to better create more of a "tough guy" image as well as cover his
    actual ungainly gate from the football injuries, his unforgettable drawl, and other on screen characteristics. He would practice for hours in front of a mirror - so much so that these became him - or rather Marion Michael Morrison totally became his on screen image "John Wayne," 24/7. The nick-name "Duke" was the name of John's dog as a kid hanging around the local fire station. Marion Michael Morrison disliked his real name so much the firemen began calling him Big Duke and the dog Little Duke. It stuck for the rest of his life. Actually Marion was named Marion Robert Morrison on his birth certificate, but following the birth of a younger brother named Michael, who died very young, his parents changed his name to Marion Michael Morrison. John Wayne was also an uncle of Pro Heavyweight boxer Tommy Morrison.

    OR - at least say about six of his close pals in the Apache Junction area where John owed a ranch and a passel of land. One of my sources was Wayne's ranch manager who is still out here - now working for some other big
    movie and TV star who visits the place about once ever couple of years.

    That's my story, and.... well, I pretty much believe most of it. I also know some long time movie folks out in CA where I grew up, who's families have been in the movie acting business since before the McCarthy era and they all verified most of it (and knew the other people well and held them in high esteem.

    YMMV,
    Big John
     
  30. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Rond wrote: ...Mitchum was drafted in 1945

    OK... but the point being just how did a healthy male (him), ages 23 to 27 escape service during WWII given that the average age of those serving during the war was age 25-26? He shucked and jived and managed to keep his pretty little hide in Hollywood for almost the entire duration. In April 1945 the war in Europe was a couple weeks away from its end.

    Hence my comment of his compensating behaviors a'la beverage choices. Same with the Duke for that matter. Wayne decided to make up for not going in person by his long string of later (and commendable) actions. Of the two, Wayne did a mite better in that regard, IMHO.

    Tom M
     

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