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New York gets Super Bowl XLVIII

Discussion in 'Chargers Fan Forum' started by Ride The Lightning, May 25, 2010.

  1. Ride The Lightning

    Ride The Lightning Join the Dark Side, we have cookies.

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    http://sports.espn.go.com/new-york/nfl/news/story?id=5219486

    IMO every warm weather team in the NFL just got raeped by the league. RETARDED idea. I hope it snows so ****ing bad that the league gets embarassed on national tv. Since when is WEATHER supposed to be a factor in the biggest game of the year? What if San Fran has to play New England? Or Green Bay plays the Chargers? Or Arizona plays the Steelers? How the **** is that fair to put a warm weather team up against one that is used to the cold?

    F U C K I N G L A M E

    :tdown:
     
  2. nflhof

    nflhof BoltTalker

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    Put it any way you want this is about NY NJ or the east effing coast. The NFL will do whatever the hell they want to do.
     
  3. HollywoodLeo

    HollywoodLeo Well-Known Member

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    I hope there's blizzard conditions.
     
  4. szarmes

    szarmes I am the Walrus

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    and it gets post-poned
     
  5. Johnny Lightning

    Johnny Lightning Go Bolts

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    Bad idea... :tdown:
     
  6. Savage Lizard

    Savage Lizard Charger fan at 7000'

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    This is a terrible idea. I hope it's a complete debacle. I hope it snows so bad nobody can get to the game. I hope conditions suck so bad that planes have a hard time getting in and out of the area.

    The Super Bowl should not be decided by ****** weather.
     
  7. Savage Lizard

    Savage Lizard Charger fan at 7000'

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    What I really fear is that we FINALLY get in the Super Bowl and are heavy favorites, but we lose to some team we should kill because the weather somehow screws us.

    I still haven't forgotten that loss to Cincy in 59 degree below zero weather. Yeah, that wasn't the Super Bowl, but it still leaves a bad taste in my mouth. I have no doubt we beat the Bengals if the weather doesn't kill our high scoring offense.
     
  8. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    Pfffttt .... I like the idea of the NFL getting back to the basics by playing the game in inclement weather.

    It reminds me of the good old days of head slaps, stick 'em and playing this game in the mud - mano y mano.

    Today's game is too clean and antiseptic. It has pussified the players and the fans. :yes:

    Weather does not decide a game - heart decides the game. :bolt:
     
  9. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    The playoff weather was pretty damn good in San Diego when we thought we would beat the Houston Oilers who were missing their starting QB and RB in Dan Pastorini and Earl Campbell etc etc.

    It was stupid of Coryell to not adapt to the Cincy conditions and not run the effing ball......
     
  10. sdbound

    sdbound Well-Known Member

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    Like everyone else here I'm baised to San Diego as the Superbowl host every five years or so....but, a Superbowl in the snow would make excellent theater. It is all about television money.
     
  11. Scott the Rock

    Scott the Rock BoltTalker

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    :tup:Right
     
  12. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    Lets take a walk down memory lane for those of you hating the idea of seeing a game played on a field which looks like a pigs pen overflowing with pig ****.

    Gale "The Kansas Comet" Sayers had a 14 touch 6 TD game in the mud.

    Mike Ditka who was a tight end said "the weather made a difference......If it would have been dry, Sayers would have had 10 TD's" or something to that effect.

    They play that game on the old time NFL classics and man oh man that was a kick *** game to watch with defenders sprawling all over the place trying to bring down Sayers. :yes:
     
  13. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man Well-Known Member

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    Ok .... I googled (yeah I am working it) Sayers game in the mud and this looked like a good read ....

    Gale Sayers
    14 Touches, 6 Touchdowns
    By Ralph Hickok

    (NOTE: This article originally appeared on about.com Dec. 12, 2000.)
    It was cold and very wet at Wrigley Field as the Bears prepared to play the 49ers on Dec. 12, 1965.

    Players tested the muddy surface as coaches, fans, and sportswriters watched. Then they all agreed that this would be a low scoring game, on the order of 6-3 or 10-9, maybe even one of those scoreless ties that the Bears had specialized in back in the 1930s.

    So much for theories. A rookie named Gale Sayers, a.k.a. the Kansas Comet, defied the mud and blazed for six touchdowns that afternoon, tying the NFL record.

    Mike Ditka was the Bears' tight end that day. "Yeah, the mud affected the kid," Ditka said after the game. "If it had been dry out there, he would've scored 10 touchdowns."

    Sayers' scoring spree began on the second play of the game, with Chicago facing a second-and-10 at its own 20-yard line. Quarterback Rudy Bukich tossed a screen pass to Sayers, who threaded his way through virtually the entire San Francisco defense to turn it into an 80-yard touchdown.

    The Bears soon got the ball back and moved to the 49ers' 21-yard line. Sayers took a pitchout, outran defenders to the corner, evaded a couple of would-be tacklers, and headed for the end zone. Defensive back Jimmy Johnson had a clean shot at Sayers about the 3-yard line, but he never touched him. Sayers simply jumped over Johnson to score.

    He made it three TDs in the first half by scoring on a 7-yard sweep that put the Bears ahead, 27-13.

    In the third quarter, Sayers scored on the pitchout again, this time from 50 yards out, leaving defenders scattered like breadcrumbs in his path. His fifth touchdown, late in the period, was a simple 1-yard dive over the defense.

    Several of his Chicago teammates knew that the NFL record was only one touchdown away, and they told him so between periods.

    Sayers almost tied the record early in the fourth quarter, when he fielded a punt at his own 18, left more defenders grasping air, and approached the 50-yard line with only punter Tommy Davis in his way. But, as he made a cut to elude Davis, Sayers slipped and went down. It was the only time the mud bothered him that afternoon.

    Then came an instant replay with a different ending. Sayers caught another punt, this time at the 15, and this time neither defenders nor the mud could stop him. About 15 seconds and 85 yards later, he had his sixth touchdown of the game.

    That was the end of his day's work. Despite the chant, "We want Sayers!" from the fans at Wrigley Field, Coach George Halas kept the Kansas Comet on the bench while the Bears scored twice more in their 61-20 victory.

    It was a pretty good day's work. Not only six touchdowns, but the incredible total of 336 all-purpose yards on just 14 touches: 113 yards on nine carries, 89 yards on two pass receptions, and 134 yards on three punt returns.

    He also accomplished football's equivalent of hitting for the cycle in baseball by scoring in three different ways. That's been done only six times in NFL history. Sayers did it three of those times, twice in 1965.

    That six-touchdown performance, 35 years ago, was the most brilliant of many brilliant games in Sayers' too-brief career. In his rookie season, he set records with 22 touchdowns and 2,272 all-purpose yards. He also threw a touchdown pass, left-handed, on the halfback option, even though he was a right-handed thrower.

    What makes that season really amazing is that Halas, who didn't like using rookies, kept Sayers on the bench for the first two games of the season, so he played only 12 games that year, averaging 189 yards and nearly two touchdowns a game.

    In 1966, Sayers led the NFL with 1,231 rushing yards, broke his own all-purpose record with 2,440 yards, and returned two kickoffs for touchdowns.

    He was used less often from scrimmage in 1967, but he still accounted for 1,579 yards. He returned only 16 kickoffs, but took three of them back for scores, and one of his three punt returns also went for a touchdown.

    In the ninth game of the 1968 season, Sayers suffered torn cartilage in his right knee. Nowadays, arthroscopic surgery often lets a player return from such an injury within two or three weeks. At that time, though, surgeons had to cut through a lot of muscle and bone to do the patching. Sayers missed the rest of the season and went through an intensive rehabilitation program getting ready for the following season.

    Even though he wasn't quite as quick and his cuts were quite as sharp, Sayers won his second NFL rushing title with 1,032 yards in 1969.

    But his left knee began to bother him in 1970. After two games, he had to undergo an operation on that knee. That was virtually the end of his career. After carrying the ball only 13 times in 1971, he was forced to retire.

    The career of the Kansas Comet was indeed comet-like. It didn't last long, but it burned brightly.

    Sayers played in only 68 games, the equivalent of just over four years by today's standard, the 16-game-season. Yet, in that brief span, he scored 56 touchdowns and accumulated 9,435 all-purpose yards, an average of nearly 140 yards per game.

    In 1977, at the age of 34, Sayers become the youngest person ever inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
     
  14. HollywoodLeo

    HollywoodLeo Well-Known Member

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    I can't speak for anybody else, but I actually don't care if the game is played in inclement weather or if said weather affects the outcome.

    I don't particularly long for the days of football lore where the "best" games are those that are played in horrible conditions, but if it happens then it's just part of the game.

    I just think it would be funny because it would piss a lot of people in the higher up positions off and make them look bad.
     
  15. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    I'd be fine with a mud bowl.

    But football shouldn't be played on a hockey rink.


    Doesn't that new stadium have artificial turf?

    :tdown:
     
  16. Johnny Lightning

    Johnny Lightning Go Bolts

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    Goodell addresses media

    Posted 2 hours ago
    5-26-2010


    NFL commissioner talks about the decision to award Super Bowl XLVII to New York-New Jersey, other topics

    NFL COMMISSIONER ROGER GOODELL
    League Meeting News Conference
    Dallas, TX – May 25, 2010

    Good afternoon. We had a very productive day. I know you want to talk about Super Bowl XLVIII. That obviously was a historic vote for the league and it’s something that took up a fair amount of time this afternoon. We had three great cities and three great communities bidding. But we also got a lot of other things done. It was an incredibly productive day. We spoke a lot about the coming season. There was a big focus on where we are with ticket sales, the challenges that are still out there in the marketplace; what our consumers and business partners are going through, and what we can do to try to make the experience better in our stadiums, which we call the in-stadium experience. This would include bringing new technology, content like the RedZone into our stadiums to make it a better experience for our fans. We also spent a fair amount of time talking about our enhanced season. Along the same lines, what can we do to improve the quality of what we are doing and offering to our fans and to our business partners? We spent a great deal of time talking about our analysis of the enhanced season and discussing all of the issues we need to discuss in that context.
    We also spent a great deal of time on labor and our planning to make sure we are focused on the right priorities with our membership and in our negotiations with the NFLPA. And we’ll continue to do that. We spent time on medical issues, making sure we keep a focus on how do we keep the game as safe as possible. That includes everything from equipment to our medical procedures and even rules to make sure that we are doing everything to make sure our game is safe for our players.
    From a competitive standpoint, we spent a fair amount of time on three or four issues, most specifically the overtime rule. The issue was tabled. We will not be implementing a change to overtime for the 2010 regular season. The membership and Competition Committee felt that we had addressed the issue we wanted to this offseason with respect to postseason. We want to continue to talk to our players, our business partners. We would like to take these steps incrementally and revisit that issue after the conclusion of the 2010 season.
    On the New York-New Jersey Super Bowl and your role in getting it done:
    Far too much is being made of my role. Our job is to make sure we present three terrific bids. Our staff and the Super Bowl Advisory Committee did that. There are three great communities, two of which we’ve had experience with. New York-New Jersey came in as a new bid with a new stadium with two franchises and I think there are some unique aspects to this and I think that appealed to our membership. But it was a tough vote because we had three great bids.

    On the possibility of future cold-weather Super Bowls:
    I think each game will be decided on an individual basis. I do believe that New York is a unique market. I think the membership recognizes that. It is the number-one market in our country and in many cases around the world. From that standpoint it will be a great experience for our fans and for the NFL. I am confident that the bid they put together will turn out to be a great event.
    On impact of SB XLIV:
    Obviously it was one of the greatest games we’ve had in the history of the NFL and certainly in Super Bowl history. Not only was it the play on the field, but the story of the Saints and the role they’ve had in their community in restoring hope and the connection they have with their community that had been through such a difficult period. The role the NFL and in particular the Saints played in that is something that we can all be very proud of. It added to the story of a terrific football game. When we reflect back on that, you can look at the records of the largest audience in the history of television. One of the greatest games, if not the greatest game in the history of the NFL. But it’s really the core of the relationship between that team and the fans and the history of the fans in that region that is something we’ll remember.
    On importance of innovation:
    I feel very strongly that we cannot be complacent in what we do. We have to continue to find ways to grow the game, to reach new fans, to continue to provide quality. That’s what the NFL represents. Innovation is a big part of our initiative. Whether it’s the Super Bowl in New York or the changes we’ve made to the Draft or the changes we’ve made to the Pro Bowl, we’re going to try to find new ways to reach our fans and make sure we’re bringing them the highest quality entertainment and make them feel good about following the NFL.
    On status of labor negotiations:
    I wouldn’t say there are any developments or any specific progress that I would report today. We continue to have dialogue on a variety of different matters. We will be having another formal negotiation in June. We need to focus in on the importance of getting progress in some of these key areas. You know all the issues.
    On enhanced season:
    Our first formal negotiation session was a year ago in June and that first session was entirely focused on the enhanced season. I expect that will be the focus of the next negotiating sessions. What it represents to us is a way to grow the game and grow the opportunities, not only for our fans and our business partners, but for the players as our partners. We have to continually look at ways to improve what we’re doing. It’s been very clear to us from not only our fans but also from our players that the quality of the preseason and the desire to participate in preseason is not at the level it should be. We have to address that issue and I expect we will be doing that at the August meeting.
    On Roethlisberger situation:
    When I return following these meetings, I expect to be sitting down with our staff and reviewing the evaluation and determining the next steps. Sometime in the next week or so I will be issuing a decision.
    On reports on ticket sales and blackouts:
    We’re still in a challenging environment. We obviously see what our fans are going through. There is still a lot of uncertainty out there in our fans’ minds. That’s reflected in their willingness to commit to season tickets. We’re having to work harder and spend more resources to get our fans to engage. Whether it’s on a season ticket basis or smaller game packages or individual game package or group sales. That takes a lot more work and energy. We spend a lot of time talking about best practices, what’s working in certain markets that we can apply to other markets. The clubs are working extra hard to do it. It is clearly a challenging market. I don’t expect to see blackouts beyond what we saw last year. I think we will work hard and be effective again like we were last year.
    On Dr. Galea and possibility of league discipline:
    We are going to pursue all of the information that’s been publicly available. Hopefully we’ll get additional information as the case proceeds. We are very anxious to understand all of the details and pursue it aggressively and we will. We don’t take those issues lightly. It’s important for us to get whatever information is available and we will pursue it in accordance with our policies.
    On Los Angeles stadium and importance of a retractable roof:
    There’s no cookie-cutter approach to this. What works in one community doesn’t necessarily work in another community. In large part, the reason we’ve been successful in getting our stadiums built is we’ve worked in public-private partnerships to find solutions that the community may have to address or those issues that they may have to address and we find reasonable solutions. In the case of the downtown LA stadium, that could potentially be addressing an issue with respect to convention facilities and would it add to the convention facilities they have in that area? That’s how we’ve been successful. We’ve done it in Indianapolis and other communities where we try to identify the issue and see if we can be part of the solution.
    On a public component to a stadium project in Los Angeles:
    I can’t address any of the specifics of it because I think they are at a very early stage of addressing that. I know these things are successful when they are public-private partnerships, when the public and the private sector work together to create these solutions. And that is what we want to do.
    On American Needle ruling:
    This is a case arising from a licensing issue. We make collective decisions that are in the best interest of the 32 teams. The court, and I haven’t read the full decision at this point in time, recognizes that the league should make decisions collectively in its best interest, that we are unique and have special characteristics in that way. That’s positive. As it relates to the specifics, it goes back to the trial court and we’ll work it out. We’ll find a way to go through the legal process and continue to address our licensing process as we have. As you know, no court has said what we have done is illegal.
    On impact on labor situation:
    I’ve never bought that. I’ve said before our labor issues are going to get addressed in collective bargaining and that’s where they should get addressed. I’ve never felt that this had any impact on our collective bargaining process. What we have to do there is sit down at the table, address our issues and get it resolved. We will have a labor agreement and it will be done through collective bargaining and not through the courts.
    On HGH testing:
    We’ve proposed that in our collective bargaining discussions. The only way to reliably do that is through blood testing at this point in time. But we support that because we think it’s important in making sure that we are all playing by the same rules. It is a health and safety issue also. We will continue to press it in negotiations and I’m hopeful we will reach an agreement where our new drug program will make some advancements, including HGH testing.
    Are you confident it will be in the next agreement?
    I know that the NFL is going to continue to push for it aggressively.
    On StarCaps issue:
    The lawyers are probably better at addressing all the decisions. From what I understand, the courts have dismissed all the issues about the fact that our program wasn’t applied properly. They have supported that in every one of their decisions. The latest decision we are going to have to evaluate and see what the impact is. I’ve said repeatedly that we’re going to defend our drug policy. We are going to look to improve it at every opportunity. It’s important that our policy be applied consistently to every player in the NFL. The idea that we and anybody in professional sports can have an effective program having different standards by state, it’s just not realistic. If it takes federal legislation or some other solution, we are going to continue to pursue that and defend our position. I repeat again -- every decision I have seen has supported what the NFL has done.
    On status of Stan Kroenke’s bid:
    I don’t expect another league meeting until August. We did discuss that today and had an update. We spoke to our Finance Committee yesterday and Stan met with the Finance Committee, too. We will continue to work on that over the summer but it would be our hope to address that prior to the start of the regular season.
    On NFL cross-ownership rules and Stan Kroenke meeting them:
    That’s still a little bit of a moving target and that’s something we discussed yesterday. Stan has made it very clear that he wants to be compliant with NFL rules and that he is willing to work towards finding a way to do that. And that is what our committee is willing to do.
    On De Smith’s comments about HGH:
    De will have to respond for himself. I can’t respond to that. I think obviously one of the reasons the NFL has had the most effective drug program is because we’ve made changes to our policy, particularly as technology has advanced. There wasn’t a test for HGH several years ago. That technology has developed. In the best interest of the integrity of our sport, we need to pursue that and pursue it aggressively. That’s why we’ve made the proposal to the Players Association. It’s part of the negotiation. They haven’t agreed to it yet.
    On the June 2 medical conference on concussions:
    It came up in a couple of places. Obviously we briefed the membership on the June 2 conference that we’re having. We think it’s going to be a very productive session. We are going to have all of our medical personnel there on the team level. We are going to continue to work hard and show leadership in this area.
    We also discussed the concussion issue in the context of equipment and the independent testing we’ve been going through with the helmets and making sure that we communicate that properly to the players this summer so they understand the technology and advancements and types of helmets that they should be using.
    We also talked about player equipment in general. In particular, one of the issues we’ve been focused on is padding in general – hips, knee pads, side pads, properly fit shoulder pads. This has been a focus of ours, whether this should be mandatory going forward, whether we should require all of our players to wear these types of pads. We’ve discussed this with our Players Association and we’re going to advance some of the technologies. We think it’s possible and there are some prototypes currently from some of the manufactures of a one-piece unit that would have the hip pads, the thigh pads, and the knee pads all in one. You could have rib pads and additional padding in the shoulder area with performance wear underneath the shoulder pads. We think these are great advances. We want to experiment and will experiment with some of that in training camps. And hopefully, we will implement some of it on a league-wide basis for the 2011 season.


    http://www.chargers.com/news/article-1/Goodell-addresses-media/92580708-b281-48e4-bfb1-843b60f0fa52
     
  17. Lancer 1

    Lancer 1 Eternal Optimist

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    I don’t mind a cold weather Superbowl so much, but I am getting kind of sick of the constant ball washing that the NFL “performs” on the city of New York – first they screw the Saints after Hurricane Katrina by giving the Giants a 9th home game (I know that game could not have been played in New Orleans, but there are other places in Louisiana or closer to it that should’ve hosted that “Saints home game” vice painting the Meadowlands in New Orleans colors, then filling the stands with Giants fans) and there are many other places with a ton of NFL history, like Lambeau or Soldier field that should’ve hosted the first cold weather Superbowl.

    Even if the NFL was bent on holding it in a “new” stadium, both the Steelers & Eagles have built them recently and neither one of those cities were even considered, even thought Pittsburgh is the 1st NFL franchise to win 6 Superbowls.
     
  18. Aggieman

    Aggieman I bleed blue and gold

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    Elements are a part of the game too. I like the prospect of a snow Super Bowl or a mudder. The Bolts can win easily in both conditions and many more anyway.
     

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