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News from the rest of the West

Discussion in 'Chargers Fan Forum' started by Buck Melanoma, Aug 2, 2012.

  1. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    Chiefs' defensive injuries pile up

    2:15PM ET
    Kansas City Chiefs
    Earlier this week, we brought to your attention a slew of injuries that had befallen starting defenders on the Kansas City Chiefs. Time to add another to the list, as a date with the Atlanta Falcons looms on Sunday.
    Jovan Belcher is not practicing on Thursday, according to the Kansas City Star, and is being replaced by Brandon Siler, who didn't play at all in 2011 due to an Achilles tendon injury. Bill Williamson of ESPN's AFC West blog writes that another injury on D is the last thing the Chiefs need with Matt Ryan and Co. on the docket in Week 1:
     
  2. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    Chiefs' problems deeper than missing star players



    BY SAM MELLINGER

    The Kansas City Star


    The NFL’s season started in full on Sunday, and maybe next week the Chiefs can start theirs, too.

    [​IMG]
    DAVID EULITT
    Chiefs head coach Romeo Crennel looked at his play sheet during the third quarter.



    One game is not enough to go into full panic mode, but the Chiefs are apparently intent on putting that theory to the test. In the last four seasons, three teams have given up 40 or more points in a season opener at home — and two are the Chiefs.
    Wrap yourself in a blanket of denial if you want, believing that Tamba Hali and Brandon Flowers will be back soon to fix all the Chiefs’ problems, but the coaching staff is one night into watching what amounts to a horror film of a game tape from a 40-24 loss to the Falcons on Sunday that is surely telling them otherwise.
    On paper, the Chiefs have talent. On the field, they followed up a limp preseason in which precious little got accomplished with a clumsy season opener that has fans debating awful and pointless questions like whether this was worse than last year’s flop against Buffalo.
    The answer, as you know: they both (stink). One led to a coach’s firing. Another season like that and the consequences might climb the organization’s ladder.
    “We just gotta get better,” linebacker Derrick Johnson says. “We just gotta get better, somehow. Getting (Hali and Flowers) back is going to make us better, but as a whole, we could’ve done a lot better.”
    Good on Johnson for saying that. He’s right that Hali and Flowers coming back will help, and he’s right that they have plenty of other issues to work on too. Some of his teammates took denial home with them, like defensive back Travis Daniels saying “it’s something that can be fixed overnight.” Stanford Routt—– another defensive back — went a step further and said that when the Chiefs were down 20-17 at halftime “obviously we were doing just fine.”
    These are real problems the Chiefs have, problems that go deeper than two stars being out. If you think Hali and Flowers can make everything better, then maybe you thought Todd Haley being fired would make everything better last year.
    The Chiefs have good players. They are young and they are talented and especially on offense they are explosive. But this makes two consecutive season openers at home where the Chiefs have been inept. Last year, it eventually cost Haley his job.
    This year, the focus is on general manager Scott Pioli and, by association, Crennel. Pioli has the roster reasonably close to what he wants, and even shorthanded Crennel’s defense can’t be excused for going more than three quarters without forcing a punt. Those are the kinds of games that made Greg Robinson a permanent punch line.
    The Chiefs can talk about stopping the run — Michael Turner had 32 yards in 11 carries — but it doesn’t mean much when Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan completed 23 of 31 passes, only one of those incompletions knocked down by a Chief. It doesn’t mean much when the Chiefs managed to sack Ryan once and hit him just three other times.
    “Really, no one cares (about being shorthanded) because all they want to know is did you win or did you lose,” Crennel says. “And we lost today.”
    He’s right, of course. And that’s the way it should be. Crennel is known as an advanced defensive mind for whom players have endless belief, but right now he’s the coach of a team that gave up 6.8 yards per play and folded after a missed field goal.
    The Chiefs will have better days. Embarrassment can be a heck of a motivator in football.
    By both design and circumstance, the Chiefs are working without a metaphorical safety net. This team is built to control the clock on offense and make stops on defense and win in the margins of special teams and turnovers. There is talent, but not enough to make up for mistakes. That’s true now, and it’ll be true when Hali and Flowers return.
    The futures of Pioli and Crennel in Kansas City depend on them being able to manage that a whole lot better than they just showed.
    To reach Sam Mellinger, call 816-234-4365, send e-mail to smellinger@kcstar.com or followtwitter.com/mellinger. For previous columns, go to KansasCity.com.

    Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com/2012/09/09/3806038/chiefs-have-real-problems-that.html#storylink=cpy

     
  3. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    Some things to keep an eye on Monday:

    • Which quarterback makes the big mistake, Carson Palmer of the Raiders or Philip Rivers?

      Palmer had 16 interceptions in 10 games in 2012 and four more this preseason as he adjusted to throwing from a moving pocket. Rivers threw 17 interceptions in a span of 10 games last season, 20 overall, and is comfortable putting the ball up for grabs to give his receivers a chance to make a play.
      Palmer: "I'm not worried about anything other than getting completions and finding a way to win. You can't worry about anything else or have any negative thoughts in your head."
      Rivers: "There's a fine line to being careful and being careless. You don't want to play the game careful because then you don't make the big plays. At the same, you don't want to get carried away with trying to fit every ball in there."
    • Can the Raiders control the line of scrimmage on both sides of the ball?

      Running back Darren McFadden looked explosive and comfortable behind the zone scheme and will be leaned upon heavily. Meanwhile, Chargers running back Ryan Mathews is out while he recovers from a broken collarbone, and undrafted rookie Michael Harris is starting at left tackle.
    • Can the Raiders hold their own on special teams?

      It was a rough go during preseason, although it was rife with experimentation in terms of personnel. It will be Phillip Adams on punt returns and Taiwan Jones returning kickoffs.

      http://www.insidebayarea.com/raider...-will-benefit-from-biggest-makeover-franchise
     
  4. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    Raiders to extend contract of Marcel Reece before kickoff

    Posted by Darin Gantt on September 10, 2012, 12:41 PM EDT
    [​IMG]
    Getty Images
    The Raiders are going to do some business before kickoff against the Chargers tonight, as they’re expected to sign fullback Marcel Reece to a contract extension, according to Jason LaCanfora of CBSSports.com.
    Reece stayed away from some offseason workwhile he waited for a new deal, but as an exclusive rights free agent, he had no leverage. He signed his $540,000 tender in June, and was set to be a restricted free agent next year.
    A versatile player with roles as a runner and receiver, Reece caught 27 passes for 301 yards and was a Pro Bowl alternate last year. A college wideout, the 6-foot-2, 250-pounder is a tough matchup because of his speed and size.
     
  5. Lance19

    Lance19 BoltTalker

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    That's something I'm a lot more willing to do with Vincent Jackson than Robert Meachem :oops:
     
  6. Blue Bolt

    Blue Bolt Persona Non Grata

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    Frankly, that's something I was more comfortable with Floyd doing than Jackson.
     
  7. Lance19

    Lance19 BoltTalker

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    I like Floyd a helluva lot when he's healthy...though I'm not sure I'd prefer him to VJ on a jump ball...
    nevertheless, Floyd is a constant...my point was that the comment is less true with Meachem replacing VJ.
     
  8. Blue Bolt

    Blue Bolt Persona Non Grata

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    Floyd is better on a jump ball catcher than Jackson..... I'm surprised you didn't know that. ;)

    Jackson uses his big body to shield the defender, but he waits for the ball to drop into his body the majority of the time. Floyd attacks the ball at the highest point, where the defender can't reach it. He also has huge hands and snags balls that most can't even reach.
     
  9. Whooki Mane

    Whooki Mane BoltTalker

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    nothing wrong with a jump ball every once ina while but philip throws them WAYYY to much... how many times does he fail to make the correct reads and jus throw it up? if he can learn to check it down and take what the defense gives him he'll easily cut his ints in half
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  10. boltfanatik

    boltfanatik Toxic Minority Member

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    Right now I have more faith in Rivers long ball than I do in his abality to thread the needle in tight situations . He just seemed to lose that last year hoping it comes back this season:)
     
  11. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    Not Acceptable?
    This story originally published on WarpaintIllustrated.com
    [​IMG]
    C.J. Spiller & Ryan Fitzpatrick
    By Nick Athan
    Warpaint Illustrated Publisher
    Posted Sep 16, 2012





    With two games in the books on the 2012 season, the Kansas City Chiefs are showing they’re far from the team many felt defensively they’d be at this stage of the season. So who gets the blame?

    To answer that question off the bat, everyone. With an 0-2 mark heading into New Orleans next weekend, the Kansas City Chiefs defense appears to be sinking fast.

    As preparation began for Sunday’s Bills game this week, all the Chiefs had to contend with this week in order to defeat Buffalo was contend with the enormous talents of running back, C.J. Spiller. The rest of the offense led by Head Coach Chan Gailey doesn’t have that much overall talent. Certainly not more than the Chiefs offense.

    In the first half Spiller torched the Chiefs defense, ran around them for 123 yards and a pair of touchdowns. And if that wasn’t bad enough, he added 47 yards catching three screen passes from quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick. And all the Chiefs defense could do was let him do it until they finally shut him down in the second half.

    So why did it take so long to adjust to Spiller? That’s because, Chiefs Head CoachRomeo Crennel, could not convince his players to stay in their lanes defensively.

    But what is concerning right now after back-to-back blowout losses, his players aren’t adhering to his pleas.

    If this continues, the questions I dismissed so adamantly weeks ago that indicated that maybe the job of head coach and defensive coordinator might be too much for Crennel, could change.

    And based on the blowout loss for the second consecutive week, I’d say for the moment - he’s gets failing grades at both jobs.

    But what can he really do with an average group of defenders who aren’t playing well at any position. In fact, this defensive unit reminds me of the ones that former Head Coach, Dick Vermeil, rolled out during his tenure in Kansas City. Now I won’t go as far as giving this unit that nickname. But when you give up 75 points in two weeks of play, they’re quickly gaining ground.

    But when you have horrific play at Safety, and I’m referring to Eric Berry in that criticism. He’s yet to make a single play in two games that has made an impact for this defense. In front of him, it’s clear Derrick Johnson isn’t 100%, Jovan Belcher is too slow to do anything but gang tackle and it appears to me that - Tamba Hali is not at an ideal playing weight.

    To make things worse, the front three have all but disappeared. With no pressure up the middle, because Crennel continues to tinker with his nose tackles, the line isn’t stable. I know some have criticized the selection of Dontari Poe but he’s the teams best nose tackle and it’s time he plays three downs not one or two here and there. Just start the kid and take your chances.

    If Poe can make the leap to productivity, then maybe the awful play of Tyson Jacksonand Glenn Dorsey, who continue to get blown off the ball on every snap, might be worthy of their perch atop the depth chart.

    To me, and I’m not going to be swayed in my thought process on this debate, Jackson’s not a 3-4 defensive end. He’s an interior defensive lineman better suited for a 4-3 scheme. And Dorsey, who is playing as of he doesn’t deserve a contract extension, has yet to show signs of life in 2012.

    Ok maybe I’m spilling sour milk or grapes. But this kind of defensive football is unacceptable for a coach as respected as Crennel. Let me put it this way. KC’s defense a year ago, decimated by injuries and lack of talent, is better than the group that the head coach has worked with since April of this year.

    I’m really not sure what the answer might be to change the fortunes of this defense because there are no superstars available.

    But that doesn’t mean the team should stand pat on their roster. The refusal, unwillingness or lack of interest with a trunk load of cap space in the bank to add any street guys, like defensive end Shaun Smith or Linebacker Shawne Merriman, needs to be questioned.

    Still before I get on my tangent, it’s unlikely either would have helped the Chiefs win the last two weeks. However, it might have lit a fire under some of the veterans who aren’t living up to their draft accolades or their current performance on the field.

    In reality, there are still two more games to play in September (New Orleans on the road and San Diego at home). And one would appear that next Sunday’s contest against the hapless Saints, might not be as daunting as it once appeared when the schedule came out last April.

    But then again, the Chiefs defense isn’t exactly swimming with confidence nor is it very well coached right now. So it’s easy to assume based on what the Falcons and Bills have done to KC’s defense the last two weekends, the Saints offense may get healthy next weekend in the Big Easy.
     
  12. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    BOOYAHH!!!!!!! :chiefssuck:


    COMMENTARY

    Chiefs will never win big with Pioli in charge



    BY KENT BABB

    The Kansas City Star
    [​IMG]
    SHANE KEYSER
    Chiefs general manager Scott Pioli



    ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. -- Scott Pioli pushed his way through a doorway, into the Ralph Wilson Stadium tunnel and then, alone, disappeared into the Chiefs’ locker room.
    As the team he built was enduring the final minutes of death-by-Ryan Fitzpatrick, an embarrassing 35-17 loss to the Buffalo Bills, the Chiefs’ general manager walked toward a few minutes of solitude. Days like this are lonely when you’re the king, and maybe he embraced what is obvious to so many others who saw Sunday’s loss: that another team he constructed looks lost and unprepared. No injuries and no excuses, no former head coach to blame, and no safety net below the Chiefs’ most powerful football man.
    The Chiefs’ problems are with their coaches and players, but the bigger issue is about the man who brought in those coaches and players. Yes, this game and this season are on Pioli, and there’s no denying that anymore. And there’s no more denying another truth, whether you’re ready to read it or not: The Chiefs will never win big while Pioli is this team’s boss. His priorities are too misguided, his insecurities and denial too immense to allow Kansas City’s favorite team to win the Super Bowl that he was brought here to claim.
    Pioli is now in his fourth year of trying to justify the hype that earned him accolades in New England, respect within the NFL, and a multi-million-dollar job as a GM. Expectations were unreachable, maybe, but Pioli has done himself no favors by obsessing over trivial details, spending too much time trying to feed his addiction to his own reputation, and engineering a team using the “discount football” philosophy that has made the Hunt family richer but has gotten the Chiefs only marginally closer to a Super Bowl.
    Days like Sunday should be behind the Chiefs. This roster is so much better than the one Pioli inherited in January 2009. He’s responsible for that, too. But how much better could it be if Pioli weren’t so consumed by off-the-field nonsense? He arrived here and promised to curb a culture of losing. Instead, Pioli now oversees an organization shadowed in a culture of misplaced priorities and anxiety — and, yes, more losing.
    Now in his fourth season as GM, Pioli has spent too much time trying to justify his decisions, rather than trying to improve them.
    He whines to outsiders that the Chiefs’ salary-cap shortcomings are misunderstood? Well, spend more money, as team chairman Clark Hunt has said Pioli is authorized to do. Pioli excuses himself for his biggest mistakes, such as saying he just didn’t do his homework before hiring former coach Todd Haley? Well, why not? And he says privately that drafting a quarterback in the early rounds isn’t the point; it’s about drafting the right one. Well, Scott, then draft the right one. These things are big parts of Pioli’s job, but instead of acknowledging that, he chooses to tell himself — and, through back channels, you — that things are just fine.
    In Scott We Trust? Not anymore.
    Pioli cares more than you can imagine about what others think; about how his gilded reputation still shines nearly four years after it landed him this job.
    He calls opinion-makers in Kansas City to plead with them to share his side of the story in exchange for a nibble of access, and he spends his own time compiling ultimately meaningless statistics in an attempt to spin unpopular draft choices and questionable spending habits into a more favorable light. He hints to anyone who’ll listen — in exchange for agreeing that you didn’t hear it from him — that the Chiefs’ playoff run in 2010 and a brief winning streak last season weren’t a result of Haley’s coaching. Those, he is convinced, were results of the magic of former offensive coordinator Charlie Weis two seasons ago and, last year, the motivating skills of Romeo Crennel. He obsesses over public relations, attempting to manipulate the message large and small. Pioli is as responsible as anyone for the misconception that Haley ruined the Chiefs and that, by firing him last December, Pioli helped to save it. How does that narrative look after the Chiefs’ second consecutive blowout loss?
    Pioli craves credit and validation on good days, and he wants to hide and blame others after days like Sunday.
    He worries so much about trivial matters that it’s impossible to think that such an emphasis hasn’t been an obstacle to the Chiefs’ success. He was concerned enough about what cornerback Brandon Flowers might’ve thought if Pioli had signed Brandon Carr to a richer contract that this factored into his decision to let Carr leave Kansas City and sign with the Dallas Cowboys.
    Win, and nobody cares about how many dollars the Chiefs are under the salary cap, or which coach was responsible for past success, or why a free agent was allowed to walk. Lose, and all anyone wants to talk about is going to war with your first head coach, a new and considerably less shiny reputation built on micromanagement and insecurity, and stubbornly sticking with quarterback Matt Cassel just because you drafted him in New England, traded for him in Kansas City, and signed him to an extension.
    Pioli has, for years now, learned from far too many mistakes. Haley. Sticking with Cassel. Thinking he can control every ounce of information. A growing number of unimpressive draft classes. The way front-office employees are treated and how bizarrely secretive everyone is expected to be. Pioli wasn’t brought to Kansas City to learn from trial and error; he was hired because he was advertised as being smart enough to avoid learning things the hard way.
    Crennel is now the Chiefs’ head coach, and few people inside or outside the organization after last season would’ve suggested that elevating Crennel would be a mistake. But after an 0-2 start in which the Chiefs’ defense — Crennel’s baby — has allowed 68 points and has no idea why, that hire now looks like another blunder.
    Fair or not, Pioli’s job is to anticipate days like this, put aside emotion and past allegiance in New England and with the New York Giants, and hire a coach who can take on one of the NFL’s most talented rosters and avoid this kind of start. This is the tradeoff of cashing those big paychecks, of sitting in that sprawling office, and taking on the role of one of sports’ most powerful men.
    Pioli is a very bright man. He has made the Hunts a mountain of money and built the Chiefs into a team that should begin each season as a trendy playoff choice, and those things are enough to keep him employed for the foreseeable future. He has a cushion of otherwise undeserved job security because of this and because the Chiefs believe you’ll keep filling Arrowhead Stadium, keep tuning in to disasters like the one broadcast in Kansas City on Sunday, and keep believing that better days are ahead.
    Maybe they are, but assembling a team at a discount and prioritizing things that don’t really matter only builds a team with a limited ceiling. As long as Pioli is in that office, your expectations should have a low ceiling, too.

    To reach Kent Babb, call 816-234-4386, send email to kbabb@kcstar.com or follow him at twitter.com/kentbabb.

    Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com/2012/09/16/3818676/chiefs-will-never-win-big-with.html#storylink=cpy
     
  13. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Booyah? No... no no! It is BOONAH!
     
  14. Dublin Bolt

    Dublin Bolt BoltTalker

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    Wow that was a good read on Pioli, did not know he was such a (what sounds like) egotistical pain in the ***.

    At least AJ keeps his mouth shut and leaves all PR to Bill J.
     
  15. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    All I've ever really heard about Pioli was that he was the architect of the Pats' SB winning teams & how lucky KC was to be getting him.

    As usual, proof's in the pudding.
     
  16. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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  17. FCBolt

    FCBolt Well-Known Member

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    Didn't all the UT writers and Big Billy blogger from ESPN preach Chiefs title this year?
    :)
     
  18. FCBolt

    FCBolt Well-Known Member

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    • Like Like x 1
  19. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    I believe so. Which is a death wish.
     
  20. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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  21. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    Fun stat .... Chiefs haven't beaten NO since Montana was their QB. :chiefssuck:
     
  22. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    Glenn Dorsey pops up on Chiefs injury report


    32
    By Joel Thorman ON SEP 27, 11:25P

    [​IMG]
    Benny Sieu-US PRESSWIRE - Presswire
    Now Dwayne Bowe and Glenn Dorsey are among the 11 players on the KC Chiefs Thursday injury report.
    Earlier on Thursday Kansas City Chiefs head coach Romeo Crennel ran down the list of injured players, which we covered here.
    One name he did not mention was Glenn Dorsey.
    The Chiefs official injury report has been posted and Dorsey was listed as limited with a calf injury. We're not sure what's up with him at this point.
    [​IMG]
    David Skretta​
    @APdaveskretta

    Looks like Glenn Dorsey was out during portion of practice we could see. 150 yards away, but looked like left calf was wrapped. #Chiefs
    27 Sep 12



    If something is wrong with him, Ropati Pitoitua or Allen Bailey would step up in his place. Those are the only two other defensive ends on the roster.
    The Chiefs now have quite the collection of players on the injury report. The final one for Thursday reads:
    Did not practice: Kevin Boss, Peyton Hillis
    LImited practice: Dorsey, Dwayne Bowe, Steve Breaston, Kendrick Lewis, Ryan Lilja, Dexter McCluster, Anthony Toribio and Devon Wylie.
    Full practice: Jake O'Connell
    Here's what Romeo said about the Thursday injury report.
     
  23. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    Broncos lose J.D. Walton for season with broken ankle

    Posted by Darin Gantt on October 1, 2012, 1:28 PM EDT
    [​IMG]
    Getty Images
    The Broncos posted an impressive win yesterday, but they lost center J.D. Waltonfor the season with a broken ankle, according to Mike Klis of the Denver Post.
    The fourth-year center had only missed one snap in his career with the Broncos, prior to getting rolled up from behind in the 37-6 win against the Raiders.
    With the Patriots up next on the schedule, the Broncos will turn to Dan Koppen to replace him in the middle.
    Koppen was released by the Patriots after training camp, after starting 120 games for them over nine seasons.
    Now he’ll go back in his old role, in his old home.
     
  24. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    • Funny Funny x 1
  25. The LBC

    The LBC I'm a Real Prick

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    I read something on my site that made me laugh even more. Multiple Jets fans have written mocks wherein they actually believe they'll be able to offload Sanchez (and his God awful contract they just gave him) to the Chiefs for a 4th round pick and change. I don't know which made me laugh harder - the overvaluation of Sanchez or the Chiefs getting saddled with Sanchez as a "replacement" for Cassel.
     
  26. Ikeman83

    Ikeman83 Werter Pöbel

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    That's pretty funny, they'd probably get better compensation for Tebow right now than Sanchez.
     
  27. AnteaterCharger

    AnteaterCharger Calibrating Bolttalk, Podcast by Podcast Staff Member Super Moderator Podcaster

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    I'm shocked, SHOCKED i tell you to discover New York fans are irrational and detached from reality in this or any other universe.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  28. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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  29. FCBolt

    FCBolt Well-Known Member

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  30. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    I just felt my wife give you a psychic bitch slap for that. :roflmao:
     

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