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Padre Notes: Headley's far-gone conclusion

Discussion in 'All Other Sports' started by wrbanwal, Mar 2, 2008.

  1. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    :tup:


    Youngster homers 440 feet


    :tup:


    http://sandiego.padres.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20080301&content_id=2399694&vkey=spt2008news&fext=.jsp&c_id=sd




    PEORIA, Ariz. -- Chase Headley isn't one to measure hitting success by length, though even he was a little in awe of his home run Saturday at the Peoria Sports Complex.

    Headley -- the Texas League Player of the Year and the Padres Organizational Player of the Year in 2007 -- jumped on a sinker that didn't sink nearly enough from Seattle relief pitcher Brodie Downs in the fifth inning.

    The result was a home run that traveled an estimated 440 feet and over -- yes, over -- the batter's eye in center field, a place where few balls have gone. It was the big blow during the Padres' 11-10 victory over the Mariners in Cactus League play.

    "I got that one pretty good," Headley said, sheepishly. "That's about as good as I have hit a ball."

    One inning later, Headley -- the converted third baseman who is trying to win a job on the roster as an outfielder -- drove a double to center field that one-hopped the wall, some 410 feet away, and drove in two runs.

    "Our Minor League people tell us he's got a great approach at the plate. I think the power is going to increase as he gets older," Padres manager Bud Black said. "Those two balls really jumped off his bat. The first one would have been out of any ballpark in the big leagues."

    Headley, who appeared as a pinch-hitter in the ninth inning of Friday's 13-9 loss to the Royals, said getting a chance to string together some at-bats in one game -- he had three Saturday -- was important to his success at the plate.

    "I felt good today," he said. "It's nice to get a few at-bats stacked. When you're going and getting one or two it's tough to get in any kind of rhythm especially when you're playing every other day."
     
  2. AnteaterCharger

    AnteaterCharger Calibrating Bolttalk, Podcast by Podcast Staff Member Super Moderator Podcaster

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    Headley still has to just rocket the ball all over the place to be the starting LF, he's going to go to AAA
     
  3. rexy2006

    rexy2006 Well-Known Member

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    He would not smile for me:

    [​IMG]

    He's slated to go to AAA. Same as LeBlanc. I hope if they both continue to impress at ST that they dont hold them down.
     
  4. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    I'd like to see management start to look at these guys a little harder. We need players that hit the ball hard. they don't need to hit home runs, just put some damn fear in the opposing team!!

    :tup:
     
  5. tboltzcali

    tboltzcali Well-Known Member

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    I think you almost have to start Chase this year. We have no other option.
     
  6. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Notes: Headley has eventful day


    http://sandiego.padres.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20080305&content_id=2406583&vkey=spt2008news&fext=.jsp&c_id=sd


    PEORIA, Ariz. -- No one ever said this learning the outfield stuff was going to be easy or mundane.

    Chase Headley, the converted third baseman, had an adventurous day Wednesday against the A's at Phoenix Municipal Stadium.

    Headley was tested several times in left field, including twice in the first inning when he missed a fly ball off the bat of Jack Cust with a diving attempt after getting a late jump. Later in the same inning, Headley made a nice running catch of Jack Hannahan's fly ball in the gap in left-center field.

    Then in the third inning, Headley narrowly missed making a running catch on a ball hit again by Hannahan, which resulted in a double. Headley made up for it later in the inning by making a diving grab in the left-field corner on Travis Buck's fly ball.

    "With the exception of the very first ball, I felt like I did a good job," Headley said. "I think it was a very productive day. It kept me on edge all day. Up to this point, I haven't had, to my estimation, very many difficult balls. Today, I saw some of those balls.

    "Was it perfect? No. But I thought it was pretty good considering the circumstances."
     
  7. HollywoodLeo

    HollywoodLeo Well-Known Member

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    Jody Gerut is having a pretty good spring.

    Just hope he's not another ST wonder ala Termell Sledge.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. EsDee_in_RI

    EsDee_in_RI Well-Known Member

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    I completely agree...they need people that can hit consistently. I know those are hard to come by but Petco is so big that it's hard to try and bring someone that can hit home runs in that park day in and day out.
     
  9. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    I'm on board with this guy!!

    Headley homers, triples, drives in three


    Padres at the plate: Padres outfielder Chase Headley had a big afternoon, going 2-for-3 with a triple, home run and three RBIs. Tony Clark hit his first home run of the spring with a two-run drive in the first inning. Craig Stansberry also homered for the first time this spring in the eighth inning. Outfielder Vince Sinisi fractured a wrist trying to make a diving catch in the outfield.
     
  10. rexy2006

    rexy2006 Well-Known Member

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    Headley, McAnulty boosting bids for roster

    By Tom Krasovic

    UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER

    March 9, 2008
    SURPRISE, Ariz. – The calf strain suffered by center fielder Jim Edmonds has widened the window of opportunity for young left fielders Chase Headley and Paul McAnulty, whose chances for a 25-man roster spot are rising.

    Headley was already making a strong bid for the starting job before Edmonds limped off the field Thursday. The injury transformed the precamp frontrunner in left field, Scott Hairston, into the first candidate for center.

    Yesterday, Headley hit a two-run home run, a triple and a sacrifice fly in a 9-5 win over the Rangers. He is batting .500 in 16 at-bats.

    “Each day, he looks more comfortable in the outfield,” manager Bud Black said. “He's doing fine in the outfield, and at the plate he's showing what our minor league people said about him: good at-bats consistently.”

    The Edmonds injury, according to the club, also is boosting the chances of McAnulty, who doubled yesterday and is batting .400 in 15 at-bats. McAnulty had a down season in 2007, but his .393 career on-base percentage in the minor leagues remains a selling point within the organization. Further, he is out of minor league options, and the club is concerned that if it attempted to send him to Triple-A he would be claimed off waivers.

    Headley's ability to hit right-handed could further help McAnulty, who bats left-handed. A switch-hitter, Headley batted .364 against left-handers in 107 Double-A at-bats, to go with a .454 on-base percentage and .654 slugging percentage. Black batted Headley eighth yesterday, the spot he has targeted for his left fielder, whoever it is, to open the season. Batting right-handed, he tripled in his first at-bat.

    Maddux pleased

    Greg Maddux said his legs feel stronger than last March and his arm is responding well. “I felt good, which I guess is the main thing,” he said after working three walk-free innings against the Rangers.

    Maddux, who allowed one run, was hit in the left shin by a comebacker but remained in the game and said he expects to make his next scheduled start. The right-hander lost control of a pitch, plunking Ian Kinsler in the back. “That was a desert ball, a dry spitball,” he cracked.

    The 41-year-old revealed that his “arches hurt last year,” causing him to reduce his running workouts. “My legs probably feel a little better this spring,” he said.

    Notable

    [​IMG]Black on Edmonds' chances of returning by Opening Day: “I wish I had a crystal ball. I don't know. There is a chance.”

    [​IMG]If the Padres decide they need to trade for a center fielder, the group of candidates likely will include Mariners reserve Jeremy Reed, who can be optioned to Triple-A, and Rangers left fielder Marlon Byrd, a former Phillies center fielder.

    [​IMG]CEO Sandy Alderson said the Padres will open their Dominican facility to minor leaguers April 6, followed by an official ceremony April 30. Alderson said the Padres' final cost for the construction will reach about $8.5 million.

    [​IMG]Batting right-handed, Tony Clark rifled a 430-foot home run off Triple-A pitcher A.J. Murray to left-center for a 2-0 lead.

    [​IMG]Triple-A right fielder Vince Sinisi suffered a fractured right wrist after banging into center fielder Drew Macias in right-center.


    [​IMG]The Rangers' Kevin Mench hit a three-run home run off Heath Bell.
    [​IMG]Former Padres left fielder Milton Bradley, who signed a one-year, $5 million deal with the Rangers this past offseason, has yet to play in a game in spring training as he recovers from reconstructive knee surgery. He might appear in a minor league game next week.




    <HR noShade SIZE=1>
     
  11. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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  12. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Headley's time clock stands still in Portland

    well, this explains some of the FO thinking,

    They know what they're doing

    :tup:

    http://www.signonsandiego.com/sports/sullivan/20080326-9999-1s26sullivan.html


    If it were strictly a matter of merit, Chase Headley would likely be playing left field for the Padres.

    But because baseball decisions are driven by myriad other factors – contractual, financial, control – the young slugger will start the season in Portland.

    And there's nothing necessarily wrong with that. Much as the Padres think of Headley, the potential cost of starting his salary arbitration/free agency clock prematurely could run into the millions of dollars. Much as Headley might be an improvement on Scott Hairston or Paul McAnulty, those guys are out of options.

    Much as fans prefer bold strokes and fresh phenoms to prolonged patchwork, it probably pays to wait.

    One more month of minor league apprenticeship should sharpen Headley's outfield skills and shorten his jump from Double-A San Antonio. It would allow him to adjust to his new position unburdened by big league performance expectations and, perhaps, to demonstrate that he can work more walks than he did in Arizona.

    Yet a stronger argument for demoting Headley in spite of his .349 spring training batting average is that it could mean another year of contractual control for the Home Team and forestall the need to part ways with some other player.

    Big league ballplayers gain the bulk of their bargaining power through seniority. Players become eligible for free agency after six years of credited service and automatically qualify for salary arbitration after three years (in some cases, two-plus years). Since 172 days on in-season active lists constitutes one year of credited service, scheduling the promotions of young players becomes a balancing act between immediate need and long-term asset management.

    Milwaukee's Ryan Braun was the National League's Rookie of the Year last season, but accumulated only 129 days of service time. Thus the Brewers control Braun's rights through 2013 instead of 2012, and may be able to avoid arbitrating his salary until after the 2010 season.

    Whether delaying Braun's debut prevented Milwaukee from making the playoffs last season is conjecture, but the cash benefits are clear.

    Since Headley's background is as a third baseman, and since he is unproven at Triple-A, the Padres can certainly justify sending him out for more seasoning. Yet while General Manager Kevin Towers emphatically denies cost concerns influenced the move, the Padres would have to be short-sighted and sloppy to overlook the payroll implications of their roster decisions.

    “That really had nothing to do with it,” Towers said last night when asked about service time considerations. “If that were the case, we would never have added him to the roster last year and started the clock. . . . This is strictly about getting him more time in the outfield.”

    “Strictly” would seem overstated. Since Headley was still subject to a minor league option, his demotion spares the Padres from exposing another outfielder to waivers and serves the vital interests of flexibility and depth.

    Maybe service time is immaterial, but it's worth noting that Headley logged 19 days with the Padres last year and needs 153 more days to complete his first service year. To do it in 2008, he must be called up before April 29.

    “You would like to think that teams are basing their decisions on merit and based on what's going to make them most successful as a team,” said player agent Barry Axelrod, who does not represent Headley. “But they have a right to make a business decision. Are they making the decision of putting the best nine guys on the field? Maybe not.”

    It's hard to prove motive, but it's harder to discount money in any baseball decision.

    Despite his extraordinary talent and enormous hype, Darryl Strawberry did not break camp with the 1983 New York Mets. He debuted on May 6 of that season, too late to qualify for a full season of service, but in time to become the National League's Rookie of the Year.

    Similarly, the Chicago Cubs kept fading Leon Durham over phenom Mark Grace to open the 1988 season, only to promote Grace on May 2 and trade Durham on May 19. Twenty years later, Axelrod still senses a hidden agenda.

    “Mark had a great spring, Bull (Durham) had a mediocre spring and they sent Mark down,” Axelrod said. “That was enough to keep Mark from arbitration eligibility for a year longer.

    “I still to this day can't say why the Cubs did it, but it sure looked (suspicious).”

    Unlike Headley, however, Grace was not learning a new position. Nor were the '88 Cubs a contending club. Each case has its own context.

    “From a selfish standpoint, we would have put (Headley) on this club,” Towers said. “Does he have a chance to be better than what we're going to break with? He may. But we want him to get more comfortable (in the outfield). He just needs time out there, experience: balls under the lights, different venues, different angles, different caroms off walls.

    “When you've got 64 guys in camp, it's tough to get him out there as much as you'd want. I'd like to see him get out there for full games for six weeks.”

    If Chase Headley is everything the Padres expect, he'll be worth the wait.
     
  13. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Headley's time clock stands still in Portland

    well, this explains some of the FO thinking,

    They know what they're doing

    :tup:

    http://www.signonsandiego.com/sports/sullivan/20080326-9999-1s26sullivan.html


    If it were strictly a matter of merit, Chase Headley would likely be playing left field for the Padres.

    But because baseball decisions are driven by myriad other factors – contractual, financial, control – the young slugger will start the season in Portland.

    And there's nothing necessarily wrong with that. Much as the Padres think of Headley, the potential cost of starting his salary arbitration/free agency clock prematurely could run into the millions of dollars. Much as Headley might be an improvement on Scott Hairston or Paul McAnulty, those guys are out of options.

    Much as fans prefer bold strokes and fresh phenoms to prolonged patchwork, it probably pays to wait.

    One more month of minor league apprenticeship should sharpen Headley's outfield skills and shorten his jump from Double-A San Antonio. It would allow him to adjust to his new position unburdened by big league performance expectations and, perhaps, to demonstrate that he can work more walks than he did in Arizona.

    Yet a stronger argument for demoting Headley in spite of his .349 spring training batting average is that it could mean another year of contractual control for the Home Team and forestall the need to part ways with some other player.

    Big league ballplayers gain the bulk of their bargaining power through seniority. Players become eligible for free agency after six years of credited service and automatically qualify for salary arbitration after three years (in some cases, two-plus years). Since 172 days on in-season active lists constitutes one year of credited service, scheduling the promotions of young players becomes a balancing act between immediate need and long-term asset management.

    Milwaukee's Ryan Braun was the National League's Rookie of the Year last season, but accumulated only 129 days of service time. Thus the Brewers control Braun's rights through 2013 instead of 2012, and may be able to avoid arbitrating his salary until after the 2010 season.

    Whether delaying Braun's debut prevented Milwaukee from making the playoffs last season is conjecture, but the cash benefits are clear.

    Since Headley's background is as a third baseman, and since he is unproven at Triple-A, the Padres can certainly justify sending him out for more seasoning. Yet while General Manager Kevin Towers emphatically denies cost concerns influenced the move, the Padres would have to be short-sighted and sloppy to overlook the payroll implications of their roster decisions.

    “That really had nothing to do with it,” Towers said last night when asked about service time considerations. “If that were the case, we would never have added him to the roster last year and started the clock. . . . This is strictly about getting him more time in the outfield.”

    “Strictly” would seem overstated. Since Headley was still subject to a minor league option, his demotion spares the Padres from exposing another outfielder to waivers and serves the vital interests of flexibility and depth.

    Maybe service time is immaterial, but it's worth noting that Headley logged 19 days with the Padres last year and needs 153 more days to complete his first service year. To do it in 2008, he must be called up before April 29.

    “You would like to think that teams are basing their decisions on merit and based on what's going to make them most successful as a team,” said player agent Barry Axelrod, who does not represent Headley. “But they have a right to make a business decision. Are they making the decision of putting the best nine guys on the field? Maybe not.”

    It's hard to prove motive, but it's harder to discount money in any baseball decision.

    Despite his extraordinary talent and enormous hype, Darryl Strawberry did not break camp with the 1983 New York Mets. He debuted on May 6 of that season, too late to qualify for a full season of service, but in time to become the National League's Rookie of the Year.

    Similarly, the Chicago Cubs kept fading Leon Durham over phenom Mark Grace to open the 1988 season, only to promote Grace on May 2 and trade Durham on May 19. Twenty years later, Axelrod still senses a hidden agenda.

    “Mark had a great spring, Bull (Durham) had a mediocre spring and they sent Mark down,” Axelrod said. “That was enough to keep Mark from arbitration eligibility for a year longer.

    “I still to this day can't say why the Cubs did it, but it sure looked (suspicious).”

    Unlike Headley, however, Grace was not learning a new position. Nor were the '88 Cubs a contending club. Each case has its own context.

    “From a selfish standpoint, we would have put (Headley) on this club,” Towers said. “Does he have a chance to be better than what we're going to break with? He may. But we want him to get more comfortable (in the outfield). He just needs time out there, experience: balls under the lights, different venues, different angles, different caroms off walls.

    “When you've got 64 guys in camp, it's tough to get him out there as much as you'd want. I'd like to see him get out there for full games for six weeks.”

    If Chase Headley is everything the Padres expect, he'll be worth the wait.
     
  14. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Headley's time clock stands still in Portland

    well, this explains some of the FO thinking,

    They know what they're doing

    :tup:

    http://www.signonsandiego.com/sports/sullivan/20080326-9999-1s26sullivan.html


    If it were strictly a matter of merit, Chase Headley would likely be playing left field for the Padres.

    But because baseball decisions are driven by myriad other factors – contractual, financial, control – the young slugger will start the season in Portland.

    And there's nothing necessarily wrong with that. Much as the Padres think of Headley, the potential cost of starting his salary arbitration/free agency clock prematurely could run into the millions of dollars. Much as Headley might be an improvement on Scott Hairston or Paul McAnulty, those guys are out of options.

    Much as fans prefer bold strokes and fresh phenoms to prolonged patchwork, it probably pays to wait.

    One more month of minor league apprenticeship should sharpen Headley's outfield skills and shorten his jump from Double-A San Antonio. It would allow him to adjust to his new position unburdened by big league performance expectations and, perhaps, to demonstrate that he can work more walks than he did in Arizona.

    Yet a stronger argument for demoting Headley in spite of his .349 spring training batting average is that it could mean another year of contractual control for the Home Team and forestall the need to part ways with some other player.

    Big league ballplayers gain the bulk of their bargaining power through seniority. Players become eligible for free agency after six years of credited service and automatically qualify for salary arbitration after three years (in some cases, two-plus years). Since 172 days on in-season active lists constitutes one year of credited service, scheduling the promotions of young players becomes a balancing act between immediate need and long-term asset management.

    Milwaukee's Ryan Braun was the National League's Rookie of the Year last season, but accumulated only 129 days of service time. Thus the Brewers control Braun's rights through 2013 instead of 2012, and may be able to avoid arbitrating his salary until after the 2010 season.

    Whether delaying Braun's debut prevented Milwaukee from making the playoffs last season is conjecture, but the cash benefits are clear.

    Since Headley's background is as a third baseman, and since he is unproven at Triple-A, the Padres can certainly justify sending him out for more seasoning. Yet while General Manager Kevin Towers emphatically denies cost concerns influenced the move, the Padres would have to be short-sighted and sloppy to overlook the payroll implications of their roster decisions.

    “That really had nothing to do with it,” Towers said last night when asked about service time considerations. “If that were the case, we would never have added him to the roster last year and started the clock. . . . This is strictly about getting him more time in the outfield.”

    “Strictly” would seem overstated. Since Headley was still subject to a minor league option, his demotion spares the Padres from exposing another outfielder to waivers and serves the vital interests of flexibility and depth.

    Maybe service time is immaterial, but it's worth noting that Headley logged 19 days with the Padres last year and needs 153 more days to complete his first service year. To do it in 2008, he must be called up before April 29.

    “You would like to think that teams are basing their decisions on merit and based on what's going to make them most successful as a team,” said player agent Barry Axelrod, who does not represent Headley. “But they have a right to make a business decision. Are they making the decision of putting the best nine guys on the field? Maybe not.”

    It's hard to prove motive, but it's harder to discount money in any baseball decision.

    Despite his extraordinary talent and enormous hype, Darryl Strawberry did not break camp with the 1983 New York Mets. He debuted on May 6 of that season, too late to qualify for a full season of service, but in time to become the National League's Rookie of the Year.

    Similarly, the Chicago Cubs kept fading Leon Durham over phenom Mark Grace to open the 1988 season, only to promote Grace on May 2 and trade Durham on May 19. Twenty years later, Axelrod still senses a hidden agenda.

    “Mark had a great spring, Bull (Durham) had a mediocre spring and they sent Mark down,” Axelrod said. “That was enough to keep Mark from arbitration eligibility for a year longer.

    “I still to this day can't say why the Cubs did it, but it sure looked (suspicious).”

    Unlike Headley, however, Grace was not learning a new position. Nor were the '88 Cubs a contending club. Each case has its own context.

    “From a selfish standpoint, we would have put (Headley) on this club,” Towers said. “Does he have a chance to be better than what we're going to break with? He may. But we want him to get more comfortable (in the outfield). He just needs time out there, experience: balls under the lights, different venues, different angles, different caroms off walls.

    “When you've got 64 guys in camp, it's tough to get him out there as much as you'd want. I'd like to see him get out there for full games for six weeks.”

    If Chase Headley is everything the Padres expect, he'll be worth the wait.
     
  15. tboltzcali

    tboltzcali Well-Known Member

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    Bad move, no one else is a better fit. Gotta let the kids grow up and learn.
     

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