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Padre Offseason News/Rumors/Rants

Discussion in 'All Other Sports' started by wrbanwal, Nov 7, 2008.

  1. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    I'll start.

    I hate it when Towers uses the $$$ argument for getting rid players.

    Well he wasn't quoted so I'll chalk it up to crappy sports writers

    :tdown:


    :icon_evil:


    http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=3687064


    Padres GM acknowledges ace Peavy likely to be traded within month


    DANA POINT, Calif. -- Jake Peavy probably will be traded by the San Diego Padres before the winter meetings next month.

    After spending four days at the annual general managers' meetings, Padres GM Kevin Towers said it is unlikely the 2007 NL Cy Young Award winner will remain with San Diego, which signed him out of high school in 1999.

    Jake Peavy

    Peavy

    "The train's kind of left the station," Towers said Thursday.

    Guaranteed $63 million under a contract that runs through 2012, Peavy is relatively inexpensive when compared with what CC Sabathia is likely to get on the free-agent market. The right-hander also has a no-trade clause, so he can determine where he winds up.

    "We're not in control of the speed or the train," Peavy's agent, Barry Axelrod, said in a telephone interview. "The only thing we've got is a brake."

    Peavy's initial list of teams San Diego should concentrate on included Atlanta, the Chicago Cubs, Houston, the Los Angeles Dodgers and St. Louis. The Braves, Cubs and Dodgers appear to be the most likely candidates for a trade.

    Towers, cutting payroll following a last-place finish, anticipates a trade before the winter meetings open in Las Vegas on Dec. 8. Given the paucity of pitching, the 27-year-old is highly prized. He was 10-11 with a 2.85 ERA in 27 starts last season.

    "We're not to the point where we've agreed on who the players are coming back. We just have an idea of who's available to us and who's not," Towers said. "Now it's just a matter of looking at three priority teams that are involved and trying to figure out what our optimum deal is. Some of them involve third teams and potentially fourth teams, so it becomes a little more complicated."

    At last year's GM meetings, Philadelphia acquired closer Brad Lidge and infielder Eric Bruntlett from Houston for outfielder Michael Bourn, pitcher Geoff Geary and minor league third baseman Mike Costanzo, a deal that helped the Phillies win the World Series for the first time since 1980. Florida held trade talks on third baseman Miguel Cabrera, who was dealt to Detroit along with Dontrelle Willis at the winter meetings.

    There were no trades at this year's gathering, with talks more cautious. That's because this year's free-agent class includes stars such as Sabathia, Manny Ramirez, Mark Teixeira and Francisco Rodriguez.

    "The premium guys this year seem to be better than last year," said Mets GM Omar Minaya, whose biggest move last offseason was to acquire ace pitcher Johan Santana from Minnesota. "You'd rather do a free-agent deal than a trade, if possible, because with a free agent you don't have to give up prospects. And the way it is now, everybody is trying to keep their prospects."

    Minaya needs a closer because Billy Wagner is expected to miss all of next season following elbow surgery. K-Rod and Brian Fuentes are the top two among free agents, and both will sign eight-figure contracts. Free agents can start negotiating money with all teams starting Nov. 14.

    Dodgers manager Ned Colletti made the biggest news of the meetings when he said Los Angeles offered Ramirez a deal with the second-highest average salary in baseball. That would put the mercurial outfielder between Alex Rodriguez ($27.5 million) and Santana ($22.9 million).

    Ramirez's agent, Scott Boras, is known for protracted negotiations. Colletti wouldn't speculate on whether anything was accomplished at the pricey resort hotel overlooking the Pacific Ocean.

    "Groundwork, to me, means that you're starting to build something that'll work," he said. "I never know that until the thing's built."

    Colorado outfielder Matt Holliday, another Boras client, appeared at the hotel and sparked speculation that the Rockies will try to trade him before he can become a free agent next November.

    Brian Cashman, general manager of the high-spending Yankees, is concentrating on starting pitching after a third-place finish that ended his team's streak of 13 postseason appearances. Sabathia is likely their No. 1 target.

    "We generally expressed our interest in the players that we would love to have join us, and then see where that takes us," Cashman said. "Everybody will express interest back, and some will be more real than others."

    :bolt:
     
  2. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Peavy's agent dealing with seven teams, but only three are considered serious


    http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=3683279

    DANA POINT, Calif. -- The San Diego Padres are focusing on three National League teams as they attempt to trade ace pitcher Jake Peavy.

    Peavy has $63 million in guaranteed money remaining on his deal, which runs through 2012 and contains a club option for 2013. General manager Kevin Towers said that based on conversations with Peavy's agent, Barry Axelrod, he is dealing with seven teams, but only a trio of National League squads is being given intense consideration.

    "Jake and Barry have told me there's really kind of three that they want us to focus on. Those are the three we've been focusing on," Towers said Tuesday at the GM meetings. "I haven't had a lot of dialogue with the other four. Those clubs are still, in his mind, iffy."


    Towers wants two major leaguers plus prospects in return. He doesn't expect a trade to happen quickly but anticipates dealing the 2007 NL Cy Young Award winner.

    "When you start heading down this path, it's probably more likely to happen than not happen. I've got that feel," Towers said.

    Axelrod said the Padres approached him about a possible trade because of the team's financial situation and need to rebuild. Peavy has a no-trade clause, and Axelrod said he gave San Diego a list of five potential candidates the pitcher would approve a deal to.

    "He doesn't want to leave here. It's his home," Axelrod said.

    Peavy's initial list included Atlanta, the Chicago Cubs, Houston, the Los Angeles Dodgers and St. Louis. Towers also has said that Peavy would accept a trade to two American League teams -- the New York Yankees and Los Angeles Angels.

    Towers wouldn't identify the three main teams he is dealing with. He intends to have discussions with one team this week. Talks with the other two "were down the road," he said.

    Peavy, a 27-year-old right-hander, was 10-11 with a 2.85 ERA in 27 starts last season as the Padres finished last in the NL West at 63-99, their worst record in 15 years.

    "He was frustrated with our season last year," Towers said. "I don't think 12 months ago he would have even thought that we'd even be at this point discussing this. I mean, we were coming off four winning seasons -- and almost three of the four playing in the postseason. Jake's all about winning, and he's a fierce competitor."

    Peavy made $6.5 million last season and is due $11 million next year, $15 million in 2010, $16 million in 2011 and $17 million in 2012. The contract includes a $22 million club option for 2013 with a $4 million buyout.

    "He's not too expensive to keep," said Towers, whose opening-day payroll this year was $74 million. "It's just that last year, we lost 99 games with him. So if we're able to add multiple pieces here that we think are going to improve our club, we've got to look at it." :tup::tup::tup:

    "We need to add quite a few pieces," Towers added. "I just don't think we can bring the same ballclub back that we had in 2008 and expect to be a lot better. I like the young players in our system. I saw a few of them in September, and I think they'll be better next year. But we need to make some trades and bring in some good players if we want to get better. I mean, 63 wins -- I'd like to think we're going to get better."

    San Diego also is considering trading shortstop Khalil Greene, who is owed $6.5 million next year.

    "If we end up moving Khalil, I see it in a separate deal," Towers said. "That's not to say it couldn't happen, but less likely."
     
  3. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Peavy throws a curveball into Padres' trade talks with Braves


    http://www3.signonsandiego.com/stories/2008/nov/06/padres-peavy-throws-curveball/?padres


    Politics makes strange bedfellows and so does Jake Peavy's no-trade clause, which is why the Padres ace and his agent Thursday were discussing Braves shortstop Yunel Escobar and their preference that he remain with the Braves if Peavy is sent to Atlanta.

    Escobar is a good ballplayer whom the Padres have gleaned might be theirs as part of a package deal for Peavy.

    The unusual twist is that because of the no-trade powers given him by the Padres last December, Peavy's consent is needed for a trade to any of the other 29 clubs.

    The subject of Escobar came up Thursday morning between Peavy and his agent, Barry Axelrod. Less than 12 hours earlier, Axelrod had met with Padres General Manager Kevin Towers to get an update on trade talks that had taken place the previous three days at the GM meetings in Dana Point.

    “Escobar's a pretty good player,” Axelrod said. “To be honest, Jake and I have said, 'If that kind of trade gets made, who plays short for them?'”

    The Braves aren't among the clubs interested in trading for Padres shortstop Khalil Greene, who has drawn trade inquiries from the Orioles, Reds, Tigers and Blue Jays.

    Towers said he wants pitching for Greene.

    Escobar is a Braves pitcher's best friend. When Red Sox analyst Bill James and friends evaluated major leaguers for The Fielding Bible – a publication devoted to defensive analysis – they determined that Escobar's plus-minus score of plus-21 ranked second among all shortstops last season. Greene, meantime, had a minus-4 score that placed him 24th.

    A 26-year-old from Cuba, Escobar is a low-salary player with a career .373 on-base percentage. The Padres are trying to boost their OBP, which ranked last in the National League last season.

    :icon_shrug::icon_shrug::icon_shrug:

    Axelrod said the Padres haven't asked for approval on a trade. In the event they do, he and Peavy, acting as de facto GMs, are evaluating the capabilities of the Padres' potential trade partners. One information source for them is fellow ballplayers. Peavy's friends on the Braves include regulars Chipper Jones, Brian McCann and Jeff Francouer.

    Peavy doesn't need anyone to tell him the World Series champion Phillies and big-spending Mets are in Atlanta's division.

    “One of the things we will want to look at some point is, 'Who are you giving up? How much are you weakening your team to make this deal?'” Axelrod said. “If Team X trades three starting pitchers and a starting shortstop to get Jake Peavy, that lessens their chance of being a successful team.”

    Towers and his staff, meantime, left Dana Point on Thursday as the GM meetings wrapped up. Exploring deals for Peavy, the Padres focused on three clubs that Axelrod said he might OK – the Braves, Cubs and Dodgers.

    Towers said he also is open to making a trade that would involve an extra club or two.

    “Trade discussions with Jake have been progressing nicely, although no deal is imminent at this time,” Towers said.

    In several interviews during the GM meetings, Towers said it wouldn't surprise him if Peavy chose to stay with the Padres.

    “He came up with the Padres, and I think he has loyalty to the organization,” Towers said Tuesday.

    But if a trade is arranged, Peavy's loyalty could shift to his potential new employer.

    “That's why you can't give a blanket approval to a (potential trade partner) in advance,” said Axelrod, who obtained the no-trade clause as part of a three-year, $52 million extension that both sides said included salary concessions.

    “We know we can't control everything,” Axelrod said. “Let's say it was the Atlanta Braves and the trade didn't include Escobar. That doesn't mean they might not trade Escobar the next week.”


    :icon_huh::icon_huh::icon_huh:
     
  4. AnteaterCharger

    AnteaterCharger Calibrating Bolttalk, Podcast by Podcast Staff Member Super Moderator Podcaster

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    Escobar is considered to be a solid hitter, good defensively as well. More like a steady Khalil Greene

    Still Escobar, Reyes, Morton and one other isn't really intriguing me to trade Peavy. Frankly I would've prefered Brent Lillibridge, their faster younger shortstop
     
  5. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Hot Stove roundup: Peavy field shrinks

    http://sandiego.padres.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20081106&content_id=3667391&vkey=news_sd&fext=.jsp&c_id=sd



    I am still left scratching my head, if they want to cut payroll they can start right there!

    :icon_huh::icon_huh::icon_huh:
     
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  6. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Contract impasse forces Hoffman out of San Diego


    http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=3694923


    Trevor Hoffman, the all-time leaders in saves and the face of the San Diego franchise, will not return to the Padres for 2009. The team has withdrawn its contract offer for 2009 to Hoffman, who is eligible for free agency this fall.

    Hoffman has played the last 16 seasons with the Padres, tenure which ranks behind only John Smoltz's 20 years with the Braves among active players. He also ranks first all-time among active pitchers in career save percentage, at .892.


    Padres general manager Kevin Towers confirmed to The Associated Press in a text message that "our offer was withdrawn."

    The Padres are in the midst of making a dramatic cut to their payroll, at a time when owner John Moores is going through a difficult and costly divorce. The San Diego payroll was about $74 million in 2008, and if they complete a trade of pitcher Jake Peavy, as expected, and eventually swap outfielder Brian Giles, their payroll -- now reduced by the departure of Hoffman -- will be cut by about half.

    :tdown::tdown::tdown:

    Hoffman made $7 million last season, and the Padres' initial offer to him for 2009 was for $4 million, plus some incentive bonuses. Some friends of Hoffman felt San Diego's offer was a polite way to nudge him out the door; sources familiar with the Padres' offer said it reflected, to a degree, Hoffman's diminished performance in 2008.

    But on Monday night, Hoffman was informed, formally, that the team has withdrawn that offer.

    When Hoffman was last a free agent, after the 2006 season, his negotiations were sometimes contentious; in one meeting, he spoke angrily to Padres president Sandy Alderson. Hoffman seriously considered taking an offer from the Cleveland Indians before making a deal with the Padres.

    This time around, the Indians again are in the market for a closer, as are the Cardinals, the Mets and other teams. Working just 45 1/3 innings for a team which rarely had save chances, Hoffman posted a 3.77 ERA, his highest since 1995, and went 3-6; he converted 30 of 34 save opportunities.

    Hoffman was originally drafted as a shortstop by the Cincinnati Reds, but after he struggled to hit, staff members in the Reds organization suggested that he try pitching. Hoffman quickly adapted to the new position, impressing coaches with his ability to repeat his delivery. The Florida Marlins picked Hoffman in the expansion draft in the fall of 1992, and the following year, he was the centerpiece of the package of players shipped to the Padres for Gary Sheffield.

    Hoffman pitched in 39 games for the Padres in the final 15 weeks of 1993, and took over as the closer the following year, replacing Gene Harris and picking up 20 saves before the '94 players' strike.

    On the first day of the strike, Hoffman was playing at a beach in San Diego and dove for a football in the surf, landing on his shoulder; years later, he would describe the sound of the impact as like the air going out of a tire. Hoffman would never again throw the mid-90s fastball that he had shown in his first seasons in the big leagues.

    He already had been tinkering with a changeup, and the following season, he implemented a homemade grip for the pitch shown to him by former Padres pitcher Donnie Elliott. Hoffman pinched a seam of the ball with his index finger and thumb, the ball tucked into the palm of his right hand. Hoffman threw the pitch with the same arm speed as his fastball, but the changeup tended to approach the plate about 10 mph slower than his fastball -- and immediately, the pitch was effective for him, becoming his signature weapon.

    Hoffman registered 31 saves in 1995, and other than in 2003, when he was hurt, Hoffman has posted at least 30 saves every year. He has 554 saves in his career, 72 more than the Yankees' Mariano Rivera, who ranks second all-time in that category. He has twice finished second in the Cy Young Award voting, and has received top 10 MVP votes in five different seasons. He has made six All-Star Game appearances. It is expected that Hoffman will eventually be voted into the Hall of Fame.

    His entrance into games will forever be remembered by Padres' fans, as well as opposing players, because as he made his journey from the bullpen to the mound, the AC/DC song "Hell's Bells" -- which opens with the deeply resonating sound of a church bell -- would play. Now, that song, and Hoffman, will likely be playing elsewhere.
     
  7. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Buster Olney ---

    Dark days ahead for San Diego


    http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/blog/index?entryID=3691653&name=olney_buster



    Fourteen years ago, John Moores arrived in San Diego to restore the Padres, to restore respectability and hope for a competitive future to the franchise that had just pawned off Gary Sheffield, Fred McGriff, Tony Fernandez and others in an embarrassing and dark time that will forever be known as the Fire Sale.

    Moores was not part of Major League Baseball at the time he bought the Padres, and in those days before Google, I recall going upstairs to the library at The San Diego Union-Tribune -- I covered the Padres for the paper back then -- and asking the research staff for help to gather information on a John Moores story. Not John Moore, I said, but John Moores.



    Around the majors with Buster Olney Insider
    His backstory seemed like something out of "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington": computer geek thinks of a way to make computers work faster, makes huge dollars, and he and his wife share the profits with everybody in the company. Big baseball fan -- loves baseball. Co-workers told me then that his intention was to move to San Diego and become part of the community. He was, in many respects, the perfect guy for the team and the town, and the Padres have had many successes under Moores' ownership, including the construction (albeit protracted) of the beautiful Petco Park.

    But now it appears as if Moores will leave the Padres' baseball operations in the same condition it was when he arrived.

    He is going through an ugly divorce, and as a result, the Padres' payroll is being slashed. While some club officials have tried to downplay the notion of a major budget reduction and worked to cast the changes as a shift to a sleeker, necessary business model -- their words sounding much like those of former owner Tom Werner years ago -- the end result is a cost-cutting sequel. Except, in baseball, instead of "Chainsaw Massacre VI," it's "Fire Sale II."

    Jake Peavy, the franchise's best player, will be traded soon. There has been progress between the Padres and Braves in talks in recent days, with Gorkys Hernandez being added to shortstop Yunel Escobar within the proposed package of players that will likely be shipped from Atlanta to San Diego. The Padres will also continue to talk with the Cubs and Dodgers, but the expectation is a deal should go down before Thanksgiving.

    The Padres exercised the $9 million option of right fielder Brian Giles for 2009 on Friday, but doing so is like spending a few extra bucks on a polish job on the fenders and hub caps before selling a used car. San Diego nearly dealt Giles to Boston and later to Oakland during the season, and it stands to reason that this winter the Padres will approach Giles about waiving his no-trade rights to facilitate a trade out of San Diego. (As of Saturday evening, they had not done this.)

    It's very possible that in the days ahead, the face of the franchise, Trevor Hoffman -- who arrived in San Diego 185 months ago, in the midst of the Fire Sale -- will cut ties with the team. The Padres offered Hoffman a $4 million deal last month, which would be a $3 million reduction in salary from what he made in 2008, and friends of the pitcher wonder if San Diego is merely looking to politely nudge him out the door. Hoffman has responded by asking for a meeting with club ownership to discuss the future of the franchise.

    If Hoffman ever gets his sit-down, it would be hard for him to walk away with any conclusion other than this: The Padres are being stripped down and prepared for sale, like an old battleship taken down and sold for parts.

    In early October, San Diego's NBC affiliate reported that Moores would unload his share of the team; the team's response was to call that report "highly speculative." But whether you want to call it a Fire Sale or a business transformation, the fact is that the club's payroll was $74 million in 2008, and if Giles is traded and Hoffman does not return, it could be about half that in 2009.

    If Peavy is traded, the No. 2 starter for the Padres will be Cha Seung Baek, who went 6-10 with a 4.79 ERA in 2008.

    The Padres of next summer may well turn out to be like the Padres of 1993, a team with a couple of stars as baubles (Tony Gwynn and Andy Benes filled this role in '93) surrounded by cheap and young players, some of whom had talent that lasted: Hoffman, Brad Ausmus, Doug Brocail and Tim Worrell. Next summer's headliners will be Adrian Gonzalez and Chris Young, it appears, with Hernandez, Chase Headley and others serving in the supporting actor roles, at union scale.

    The NL West is mediocre and a rebound could come within a couple of years, after Moores' situation is settled. But the Padres of '93 were not competitive -- they went 61-101 -- and by summer's end, the seats of Jack Murphy Stadium were empty; attendance in San Diego went from 21,000-plus in 1992 to last in the majors in 1993, '94 and '95.

    After the ugliness that the casual Padres fan is seeing now, the '09 team may be awful, and another malaise in the fan base may follow. The organization is going back to the dark ages. It's sad, really. Moores' intention was to do great things with the franchise, and along the way, he realized a lot of that hope. The Padres, steered by general manager Kevin Towers, manager Bruce Bochy and president Larry Lucchino for most of the past 14 years, won four division championships and played in the 1998 World Series.

    But the John Moores of 1994 -- bright-eyed, buoyant, radiating hope -- never would have envisioned that it would all splinter apart, and that he would depart in the same manner as Werner, who, for years, was regarded as persona non grata in San Diego. The Padres, once again, find themselves desperately in need of a white knight.
     
  8. AnteaterCharger

    AnteaterCharger Calibrating Bolttalk, Podcast by Podcast Staff Member Super Moderator Podcaster

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    Might be endgame for Peavy as a Padre

    http://www.sportsline.com/mcc/blogs/entry/6270335/11665079

    Under terms of the deal discussed by the Braves and Padres, San Diego would receive shortstop Yunel Escobar, Class A outfielder Gorkys Hernandez, one of two starting pitchers -- Charlie Morton or Jo-Jo Reyes -- and either reliever Blaine Boyer or one of two minor-league left-handers (one of which is believed to be Jeff Locke).

    A shortstop, a speedy centerfielder in AA (this year), a pitcher with mental issues and a reliever (and maybe one more young pitcher)

    Wow, that is so pathetic
     
  9. richpjr

    richpjr BoltTalker

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    If they dump Peavey and don't get Tommy Hanson or Jason Heyward as a part of that package than Towers is an idiot.
     
  10. SDRaiderH8er

    SDRaiderH8er Well-Known Member

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    does that really have to happen, we all ready know that he is one.
     
  11. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Let's give this guy 1mil like we gave Mark Pryor.

    :icon_evil::icon_evil::icon_evil:


    http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=3700730


    Cubs close door on Wood after trading for Gregg from Marlins



    CHICAGO -- The Chicago Cubs acquired right-handed reliever Kevin Gregg from the Florida Marlins on Thursday, a move than means closer Kerry Wood won't return.

    Wood, the 1998 NL Rookie of the Year who saved 34 games this year, had been the longest-tenured player on the Cubs. General manager Jim Hendry said Wood was deserving of a three- or four-year deal and the Cubs are not prepared to offer him one.

    In addition to Gregg, who was the Marlins' closer until the final month last season, Chicago also has a talented setup man in Carlos Marmol.

    "We're just in a situation -- and Kerry fully understands -- that length of deal for the kind of salary that he could command right now is not our first priority," Hendry said during a conference call.

    He said the Cubs need to finish their rotation -- they hope to bring back free agent starter Ryan Dempster -- and add offense.

    "We felt it was time Kerry goes out and does what is best for him and his family and get a huge multiyear deal, if possible," Hendry said. "This is really the right thing to do. We've had some really honest conversations in the last week. We don't have to get into how much I think of him, but at the same time I don't think we could do for him right now what he deserves and what I think he'll get going elsewhere."

    Wood made an immediate impact as a rookie when he struck out 20 Houston Astros in his fifth major league start. He had four double-digit win seasons for the Cubs, but his career has been sidetracked by elbow and shoulder injuries.

    When it appeared his career might near an end because of shoulder problems, Wood returned to the bullpen in 2007 and won the closer's job last spring. He finished with a 3.26 ERA and a 5-4 record in 2008.

    Gregg was acquired for minor league pitcher Jose Ceda.

    Bothered by a sore left knee, Gregg finished 7-8 with a 3.41 ERA and 29 save. His nine blown saves tied for most in the majors.

    Hendry said Gregg had knee surgery, will begin throwing in January and will be ready for spring training.

    Gregg had a 10.13 ERA for August, but it was under 2.00 for every other month, including seven scoreless innings in September after he lost the closer job. He had 72 appearances and held batters to a .203 average.

    The trade was not a surprise because Gregg is eligible for arbitration. He was the Marlins' highest-paid player in 2008 at $2.5 million.

    He is the fourth arbitration-eligible player traded by the Marlins this offseason, joining first baseman Mike Jacobs, who was traded to Kansas City, and outfielder Josh Willingham and starting pitcher Scott Olsen, who were traded to Washington.

    Gregg joined the Marlins before the 2007 season in a trade from the Angels and had 32 saves in 74 relief appearances that year. He has an 18-21 career major league record with 62 saves with a 4.00 ERA in 271 games -- all but eight relief.

    The right-handed Ceda, who is only 21, was 4-3 with nine saves and a 3.83 ERA last season in minor league stints at Class A Daytona and Double-A Tennessee.

    "Jose is a big, strong kid with a real live arm," Marlins GM Larry Beinfest said. "We think he can help us in the back end of our bullpen in the very near future, if not right away."
     
  12. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    http://www3.signonsandiego.com/stories/2008/nov/19/padres-report-mcanulty-red-sox/?padres


    McAnulty is landing in a new spot, but he'll find some familiar faces

    Tom Krasovic (Contact)

    Wednesday, November 19, 2008

    Paul McAnulty's career .400 on-base percentage in the minor leagues never translated into consistent success with the Padres. Next, McAnulty will try to help another team that worships at the altar of OBP: the Boston Red Sox, who have agreed to terms with him on a minor-league contract.

    Red Sox scouting director Jason McLeod was the Padres scout who signed McAnulty out of Long Beach State in 2002, after San Diego drafted him in the 12th round.

    “It's not often that you get to sign a guy as an amateur and a minor-league free agent,” McLeod said Wednesday. “I think he fits a lot of what we look for in the American League. If he comes in and wins a major league job, I think his swing will work for our ballpark. He's going to fight for a spot on our bench – left field and maybe first base. He really wanted to come here.”

    McAnulty, 27, will be reunited with former Padres hitting coach Dave Magadan. In 212 at-bats with the Padres across four seasons, McAnulty batted .208 with five home runs. The left-hander batted .207 for the Padres last season. He also made some critical mistakes in the season's first half, both on the basepaths and in left field. After demoting him in early July, the Padres did not recall him.

    PEAVY UPDATE

    Among some of his ballplayer friends, Padres ace Jake Peavy has created the impression that if he is traded, he would like to pitch for the Cubs.

    Padres General Manager Kevin Towers has said that the Cubs likely will need to bring another team into the mix to put together enough talent in return for Peavy. “We're still talking to the Cubs,” Towers said. “They may have to redo some things.”

    Towers said talks with the Braves have not resumed and that he hasn't heard from the Angels.

    ROSTER MOVES

    Moving to protect minor leaguers from the Rule 5 draft, Towers said the Padres likely will add pitchers Matt Bush, Cesar Carrillo, Cesar Ramos and Jackson Quezada to their 40-man roster Thursday along with catcher Jose Lobaton and outfielder Luis Durango.
     
  13. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Everything went downhill in a hurry in San Diego


    http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/hotstove08/columns/story?columnist=rogers_phil&id=3725229&lpos=spotlight&lid=tab6pos1





    Sometimes, Kevin Towers, the longtime general manager of the San Diego Padres, catches himself thinking about the most recent important game his team played and wondering: What if?

    What if the Padres had been able to close out the Colorado Rockies in the National League wild-card play-in game at the end of the 2007 season? What if the Padres -- and not the streaking Rockies -- had moved on to meet the Philadelphia Phillies in the NL Division Series? What if the Padres had ridden the momentum of that 163rd game deep into the postseason, perhaps all the way to the World Series?

    Would things somehow be different now?

    All Towers knows is this: It's been all downhill for the franchise since then.

    The Padres were so close to a third straight playoff berth in 2007, but fell in the 13th inning to the Rockies. Since then, everything has gotten worse -- in a hurry -- in San Diego.
    "That's when it all started," Towers said. "Nothing really good has happened since then. We might be in a completely different situation now than where we're at. There haven't been many bright spots since."

    Towers is being diplomatic. Like a plummeting stock price, the Padres have been in free fall. The Padres lost 99 games this past season and finished last in arguably the worst division in baseball, the National League West. But it wasn't just about where the Padres finished, it also was about how they got there.

    "I've had less-talented clubs than this," Towers said. "But everything went wrong. We just didn't perform well on the field. I don't think we had more than a week or 10 days where we played well. That [four-game] sweep of the Mets [in June] was probably the highlight of our season."

    The Padres had to contend with injuries. Shortstop Khalil Greene punched out an equipment locker and broke his hand. Second baseman Tadahito Iguchi somehow separated his shoulder while trying to avoid being hit by a ball on the base paths. And pitcher Chris Young and catcher Josh Bard were injured by the same player in the same inning during a game in May. National League MVP Albert Pujols first hit a line drive off Young's face, breaking his nose. Later in the inning, Pujols collided with Bard at the plate, spraining the catcher's ankle.

    It was that kind of season.

    If the Padres had won that play-in game with the Rockies -- and remember, they took the lead after scoring two runs in the top of the 13th, only to have the Rockies rally for three of their own in the bottom of the inning -- they would have made three straight playoff appearances, the best stretch in franchise history.

    They narrowly avoided a 100-loss season, can't afford to re-sign the second-most popular player in franchise history (Trevor Hoffman) and have been forced into shopping staff ace Jake Peavy.

    Is this all a bad dream?

    "It's very, very frustrating," Towers conceded.

    And thanks to matters beyond Towers' control, things could worsen before they improve. The Padres are bracing for a significant drop-off in attendance in 2009, thanks in equal parts to the economic downturn and their dismal performance this past season.



    Padres GM Kevin Towers faces the task of trying to improve a 99-loss club while slashing payroll at the same time.
    In 2007, the Padres drew 2.8 million visitors to Petco Park. Last year, that figure dipped to 2.4 million. It would surprise few if the Padres were to draw less than 2 million in attendance next season.

    Then there is the soap opera surrounding the team's ownership. Owner John Moores, one of baseball commissioner Bud Selig's closest allies, is in the throes of a nasty divorce from his wife, Becky, and custody of the franchise -- like with a child -- is at stake.

    To cut costs, Moores has ordered a slashing of the payroll. Hoffman, baseball's all-time saves leader and the face of the franchise, was angered when the Padres pulled back their $4 million offer for next year. He expects to finish his career elsewhere. Towers has been openly soliciting offers for Peavy.

    The payroll, which was $73 million for the 2008 season, is likely to be sliced nearly in half for the 2009 season, forcing Towers' hand.

    "It's kind of difficult to have one player eat up a quarter of your payroll," Towers said. "We lost 99 games with Jake, and we're not going to get better by keeping him and his salary."

    Although talks with Atlanta and the Cubs have been on-again, off-again, the hope is that Towers can land three or four low-cost, high-ceiling players and begin the team's rebuilding. There's precedent: Before the 2006 season, he swapped pitchers Adam Eaton and Akinori Otsuka to Texas and got Young and first baseman Adrian Gonzalez in return.

    But beyond the payroll limits in place, there are constraints as Towers goes about the task of reshaping the Padres. Special assistant Paul DePodesta, the former Los Angeles Dodgers GM, reports not to Towers but directly to CEO Sandy Alderson and must sign off on player moves.

    "It's a mess," an industry executive said about the situation. "That whole organization is totally dysfunctional."

    It hasn't helped that the Padres haven't drafted well. Matt Bush, the No. 1 overall pick in the 2004 draft, was a bust at shortstop before being converted to pitcher, then underwent Tommy John surgery. Pitching prospect Cesar Carrillo, San Diego's top pick and the No. 18 overall selection in 2005, also has been derailed by arm problems.

    There is some hope that outfielders Chase Headley and Will Venable, as well as other young players, will continue to develop and move the Padres in the direction of respectability.

    It helps that the NL West, the division that the Padres had seemed on the verge of dominating just a few short years ago, is home to a few other teams that must share the Padres' blueprint and develop from within, which is to say, at modest cost.

    "Other than the Dodgers, it's a winnable division," Towers said. "It really boils down to our young players. For us to have consistent success, we need them to come through."

    The rest, Towers understands, is out of his control.

    "It's a daunting task that lies in front of us," he said. "But we welcome the challenge. Hopefully, we'll make some good baseball trades and get back to where we want to be. Is it a tough sell? Definitely. But compared to 1993 and 1994, when we had that fire sale, we're in a much better position."

    But the Padres are a long, long way from that night 13 months ago at Coors Field when they were three outs away from their third straight playoff spot.
     
  14. LV Bolt Fan

    LV Bolt Fan Well-Known Member

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    Fire Towers and Bud Black! :yes:
     
  15. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Organization free of bad contracts and long-term financial obligations


    I think we can safely assume the club is getting it's house in order.

    I hope if they sell it, they clean house and bring in some baseball people that can build a successful organization.

    :tup:

    http://www3.signonsandiego.com/stories/2008/nov/29/padres-s30padnotes-team-free-bad-contract/?padres




    Saturday, November 29, 2008

    A buying opportunity the likes of which has seldom confronted the Padres since John Moores bought the club could loom on the horizon.

    Whether Moores can take advantage is in serious doubt, but a prospective owner might find it enticing that the Padres have no bad contracts on their future player payrolls save perhaps the $6.5 million they owe shortstop Khalil Greene.

    You might argue that Brian Giles is overpaid at $9 million along with his full no-trade rights. The Red Sox would disagree. Just three months ago, they sought Giles for their playoff push, agreed to raise his salary to $11 million and expected he would return further value on the trade market this offseason.

    Jake Peavy's $63 million guarantee over the next four years may seem steep, especially because Peavy also has full no-trade powers. But the annual average of Peavy's deal is near or below the going rate for an ace pitcher.

    Adrian Gonzalez and Chris Young are the only other two Padres players with guaranteed contracts for 2009. Both deals favor the club, based on industry norms. Gonzalez, an All-Star first baseman, is due $3 million next year and $4.75 million in 2010 with a $5.7 million club option for 2011. Young, a No. 2 starting pitcher, is due $4.5 million in 2009 and $6.25 million in 2010 with a club option of $8.5 million for 2011.

    Every other team in the National League West, meantime, is burdened by player contracts that even the U.S. Treasury might not willingly absorb. The Rockies owe Todd Helton $57 million over the next three years; the Dodgers owe $15 million to Jason Schmidt and $20 million to Andruw Jones, each for one season, plus $28.5 million to Juan Pierre for three more seasons. Barry Zito, the Giants' No. 5 starting pitcher, is guaranteed $101 million over the next five years, and the Diamondbacks' Eric Byrnes gets $22 million over the next two years.

    The Padres certainly are familiar with toxic player contracts. From late 1998 to 2003 they larded their payroll with big guarantees to past-their-prime players such as Phil Nevin, Ryan Klesko, Woody Williams (who begot Ray Lankford), Kevin Jarvis (who begot Jeff Cirillo), Al Martin, Bubba Trammell, Chris Gomez and Carlos Hernandez. Worse, Nevin had no-trade powers.

    The low-revenue Marlins and Twins almost never made such mistakes, but the mid-revenue Padres, compromised by an underachieving farm system and ballpark construction delays, made a habit of it.

    In fact, the Padres of late 1998-2003 emphasized an inefficient buy-now, pay-later strategy, which the man who did ownership's bidding, General Manager Kevin Towers, spoke of in March 2004 when explaining why the club often moved a player to the trade block soon after issuing him a backloaded contract.

    “To make budget, we've had to give multiyear contracts and hope that the guy still has some value left to where we can move that contract in the back-loaded years,” Towers said. “Those deals were done by design. We just couldn't afford to pay them what they'd make in arbitration, so we did multiyear deals and back-loaded them.”


    Why didn't he learn from his mistakes!!! :icon_evil::icon_evil::icon_evil:

    The Padres eventually cleared the books. Future payrolls are relatively bloat-free. The current dearth of bad contracts compares to when Moores bought the club in late 1994. Taking advantage, Moores doubled the payroll within a few years. His front office invested wisely, and the club earned playoff berths in 1996 and 1998.

    The dearth of bad contracts represents another opportunity, but can the Padres take advantage? The early indications aren't promising. According to club CEO Sandy Alderson, the Padres have discussed dropping their 2009 payroll to about $40 million, which would be about $30 million less than the club's payroll to open the 2008 season.

    Financially, the Padres apparently will be squeezed to varying degrees by Moores' impending divorce, the country's economic woes and other revenue declines relating to the club's 99-loss season this year.

    Orioles in Peavy mix

    The Baltimore Sun identified the Orioles as a potential third team that could help the Cubs and Padres work a deal for Peavy. According to the report, the Orioles could be interested in Cubs center fielder Felix Pie and in return might send the Cubs a player suitable to the Padres.

    The Padres sought young pitching from the Orioles in return for shortstop Greene and might try to get an Orioles pitcher via the Cubs.

    Peavy, whose consent is needed for a trade, would prefer a trade to the Cubs over one to the Braves, according to multiple sources.


    :bolt::bolt::bolt:
     
  16. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Padres interested in Vizquel


    Great, another 40 year old

    :tup::tup::tup:

    http://sandiego.padres.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20081210&content_id=3712275&vkey=news_sd&fext=.jsp&c_id=sd



    LAS VEGAS -- The Padres' search for a shortstop after the recent trade of Khalil Greene to St. Louis may lead them to veteran Omar Vizquel.

    A baseball source said Wednesday that the Padres have inquired about the 41-year-old Vizquel, who could be looking for work after the Giants signed Edgar Renteria to a two-year, $18.5 million deal last week.

    Vizquel, who will turn 42 on April 24, hit .222 in 92 games last season with the Giants.

    Vizquel is a career .273 hitter who has spent the last four seasons in San Francisco. He started his Major League career with the Mariners in 1989 and has won 11 Gold Glove Awards, the last in 2006.

    The Padres currently plan on using Luis Rodriguez at shortstop, but general manager Kevin Towers has said he would like to add middle-infield depth, possibly in a trade.

    There have been rumors that if the Padres pull off a trade of pitcher Jake Peavy to the Cubs, they would receive shortstop Ronny Cedeno in return.

    No Vizquel deal is expected soon, as the Padres have focused their sole attention on getting a trade done for Peavy at the Winter Meetings, which end Thursday.
     
  17. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    not sure I understand how you take a couple of single-A players knowing they have to stay on the 40 man roster all year.

    :icon_huh:

    Padres add two players in Rule 5 Draft


    LAS VEGAS -- The Padres didn't leave the Winter Meetings completely empty-handed.

    On the same day when the Chicago Cubs declined to make a deal for pitcher Jake Peavy, the Padres selected two players in Thursday's Major League phase of the Rule 5 Draft.

    With the third overall pick in the Major League phase, the Padres addressed one of their roster concerns heading into the season -- middle-infield depth -- by selecting a shortstop, Everth Cabrera, a 22-year-old who played for Ashville of the South Atlantic League last season.

    Cabrera hit .284 with six home runs and 38 RBIs and had 73 stolen bases. He's regarded as a plus-defender who would have likely started the season at Double-A this season in the Rockies' organization.

    "[Losing] Cabrera hurts. He's a good, young player. You can't protect everybody. It's a long way from Asheville to the big leagues. He's got a good arm," Colorado general manager Dan O'Dowd said.

    The Padres needed middle-infield depth after trading shortstop Khalil Greene to the St. Louis Cardinals last week.

    "He's got tremendous speed, a great defender and is a guy who can make things happen on the basepaths," Padres general manager Kevin Towers said. "We'll take a look at him in the spring."

    In the second round of the Major League phase of the Draft, the Padres selected a right-handed pitcher, Ivan Nova, a 21-year-old from the New York Yankees' organization.

    Nova was 8-13 with a 4.36 ERA in 148 2/3 innings for the Tampa Bay Yankees of the Class A Florida State League.

    "He throws up to 95 [mph] and has a big, big arm and high upside," Towers said. "He could potentially develop into a middle-of-the-rotation starter."

    The Padres must keep Cabrera and Nova on their Major League roster the entire season or offer them back to their original clubs for $25,000.

    Last December, the Padres selected three players in the Rule 5 Draft -- infielder Calix Crabbe and pitcher Michael Gardner and Carlos Guevara. Only Crabbe made the big league roster, and he was returned back to the Brewers in May.

    Also Thursday, the Padres lost two players -- pitcher John Madden and outfielder Javis Diaz -- in the Triple-A phase of the Draft.
     
  18. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Padres have work to do after Meetings
    Team needs to rebuild roster, decide Peavy's status

    No Shiit!

    :icon_huh::icon_huh::icon_huh:

    LAS VEGAS -- The Padres tabled their plans this week at the Winter Meetings of filling needs of a team that lost 99 games last season as general manager Kevin Towers and his entire baseball operations staff devoted themselves to getting a deal done for Jake Peavy.

    That meant setting aside areas of concern with their roster -- finding more middle-infield help, a backup catcher and help for their bench, rotation and bullpen -- as they attempted to move Peavy for pieces that would make them better in 2009.

    So now what?

    "Now we need to start moving forward," Towers said.

    Towers plans on talking to Padres CEO Sandy Alderson when he returns to San Diego on Monday as well as talk to Peavy's agent, Barry Axelrod, in the coming days to see what's next.

    That would amount to seeing if Peavy, who has a no-trade clause, would entertain going somewhere other than the National League or pulling him off the trading block altogether and moving forward into the 2009 season with him at the top of the rotation.

    Towers expects to be busy between now and the Christmas holiday looking to fill needs, though he expects to find a few bargains after the first of the year. But if the team opts to retain Peavy and his $11 million salary for 2009, there won't be much money to spend on free agents.

    The Padres are looking at a payroll of $40 million and have already committed $9 million to right fielder Brian Giles. Add in Peavy's $11 million and there's not a lot of money to spend.

    That might mean the Padres will be active on the trade front as they go about addressing their needs, though they're reluctant to move some of their top young talent.

    "We could do some things," Towers said.

    The Padres have already talked to veteran catcher Brad Ausmus, who lives in nearby Del Mar, about signing with the team. The Padres are looking for a backup catcher to mentor and spell rookie Nick Hundley, who impressed over the final two months of the season.

    Two newcomers, shortstop Everth Cabrera and pitcher Ivan Nova, added to the 40-man roster in Thursday's Rule 5 Draft, will lend depth to the roster but certainly will not be counted on for significant contributions, as neither has played above the Class A level.

    Deals done: None. As mentioned above, the Padres tried to get a deal done with Peavy this week, but that fell through Thursday when talks with the Cubs fizzled.

    Rule 5 activity: The Padres selected two players in the Major League phase -- Cabrera from the Rockies and Nova of the Yankees. The Padres like Cabrera's defense and speed. They needed middle-infield depth after trading Khalil Greene to the Cardinals last week.

    Goals accomplished: Again, not a lot, as not being able to move Peavy and his $11 million salary in 2009 -- and $63 million over the next four seasons -- didn't enable the Padres to fill holes with players they would have obtained in the deal.

    Unfinished business: Plenty, as the Padres must now decide to move forward with talks for Peavy or simply pull him off the trading block as Towers has suggested. The team still needs pitching, starters and relievers, a backup catcher and more middle-infield help. These needs might have to be met through trades.

    GM's bottom line: "I would imagine when we get back to San Diego we'll sit down with Sandy and talk to Barry and see how we want to handle it moving forward." -- Towers
     
  19. HollywoodLeo

    HollywoodLeo Well-Known Member

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    Teams across the league do it all the time every year, it's standard business and the reson the Rule V draft even exists.

    And they don't have to stay on the 40 man roster the entire year. They have to stay on the 25 man roster as long as the team wants to keep them.

    They don't have to keep them on the 25 man roster, but if they take them off the 25 man roster they have to give them back to the team they got them from.

    Worst case scenario they prove to be no good and the other team gets their garbage back.

    Best case scenario we find some diamonds hidden in some other team's minor leagues.

    Seems like a low risk/high reward scenario to me.
     
  20. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Even worse, the 25 man roster. I just don't get it. I've never really paid close attention to the Rule 5 but it seems to me that if a team had a player on their single A roster then they probably are not ready for the Show. How many guys make the jump from single A to the Bigs every year.

    :icon_huh:
     
  21. HollywoodLeo

    HollywoodLeo Well-Known Member

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    Not many, but like I said, worst case scenario they suck and the Padres ship them back to where they came and get 50,000 bucks in the process.

    Best case scenario they find some gems buried in other teams' farm systems.

    Worst case scenario they find they suck and/or are (still) not ready for the bigs and give them back to their old team.

    Every team does this every year.

    What do they have to lose, anyways? It's not like they're going anywhere this year.

    Besides, there's still no guarantee they even start the season on the 25 man roster.

    They picked 3 players in last year's rule V draft and only Callixe Crabbe made the 25 man roster after ST. (The other two were sent back from wence they came.)
     
  22. BoltzRule

    BoltzRule Well-Known Member

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    You pick up single A players because that's where the potential is at. Most teams protect their highly regarded or talented prospects that are closer to the majors.

    But all you need to see is how Soria did, he was in our farm system and was picked in the Rule V draft and now he's a great reliever for KC.

    Like Hollywood said it's low risk/high reward type of thing, at worst you return the player back and lose 25 k at best you could find a hidden gem. So why not invest 50k and see if you can get a steal? **** I'd rather give some young kid a shot than signing some washed up 40+ yr old SS.
     
  23. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    I get it, now thinking through the process I would agree it's a low risk chance but...

    what about the fact that you're potentially taking roster spots away from your own young players by requiring that a 19 or 20 year old single A player stay on the 25 man roster for the entire year or risk losing him.

    :icon_shrug:
     
  24. HollywoodLeo

    HollywoodLeo Well-Known Member

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    To reiterate, they're not guaranteed a spot on the 25 man roster.

    It's just that if they don't get one they go back to the team they came from.

    They will get their shot in spring training and if there's no room for them on the 25 man roster because 25 other players prove that they need to be on the big league roster and/or they prove in ST that they're not ready they'll just go back to their old teams.

    The only way the rule V rules will play in the decision is they'll more than likely be favored if they prove to be ready alongside any other AAA players proving to be ready.
     
  25. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    This is what I don't get. There is just no way a young 20 something in single A is going to get the nod over an established player that has been in the system for am extended length of time.


    BUT!!!


    I can't wait for spring training!!!


    I love making the trek to Peoria/Glendale to watch these guys get ready!


    :tup::tup::tup:
     
  26. HollywoodLeo

    HollywoodLeo Well-Known Member

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    If they don't outplay the competition and earn a spot on the 25 man roster then what do they lose? :icon_shrug:
     
  27. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Yup, I'm on board, I hope they do and we turn this thing around.


    :tup:
     
  28. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Padres to play waiting game with roster


    http://sandiego.padres.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20081217&content_id=3720506&vkey=news_sd&fext=.jsp&c_id=sd


    SAN DIEGO -- Now that pitcher Jake Peavy is back in the fold -- well, for now at least -- Padres general manager Kevin Towers has set his sights on improving the roster of a team that lost 99 games last season.

    Just don't look for any middle infielders, starting pitchers or relievers under the tree in time for Christmas.

    Towers has interest in several free agents, particularly veteran middle infielders Omar Vizquel and David Eckstein among others, but likely won't make any moves until late January or early February.

    Why wait?

    "Most of our free-agent shopping is going to be done in late January, early February. ... We just don't have the wherewithal to be aggressive in the free-agent market," Towers said. "And we don't have the trade pieces to make a deal.

    "We'll wait this market out, and hopefully there will be some bargains, especially with middle infielders, that are good financial fits for us. I think there's quite a few teams in the same position we are. We don't have any other choice. We're forced to wait."

    Moving ahead with a payroll that's expected to be around $40 million, and with Peavy ($11 million) and outfielder Brian Giles ($9 million) making half of that, the Padres will have to be resourceful, if not downright thrifty, in filling their needs.

    Eckstein might be a good fit for the Padres, as they currently don't have a true Major League shortstop on their roster, though incumbent Luis Rodriguez did more than a commendable job filling in for since-traded Khalil Greene late last season.

    Eckstein, who turns 34 in January, can play second base or shortstop, and he hit .265 last season with the Blue Jays and Diamondbacks.

    Vizquel, whom the Padres made inquiries about at the Winter Meetings, will be 42 in April. He hit .222 last season with the Giants, but still showed the kind of defense that made him an 11-time Gold Glove Award winner.

    Hot Stove

    Towers is also interested in a handful of players who were non-tendered contracts last week, though those players are free agents, which, again, places the team in a wait-and-see mode moving into January.

    "There are a couple of names out there," Towers said. "But those guys are looking at decent arbitration numbers. The only sell we can make is opportunity. If someone is willing to take less and resurrect their career, to get innings and at-bats, we're the right fit."

    The Padres struck gold last January with such a move when they signed outfielder Jody Gerut -- out of baseball the previous two seasons because of injuries -- to a Minor League contract after watching him tear up winter ball in Venezuela.

    Gerut made the Major League roster, earned $700,000 and proved to be one of San Diego's most productive players -- hitting .296 with 14 home runs and 48 RBIs while covering a lot of ground in center field.












    I would have no problem with David Eckstein at SS. Dude has played on some winning teams



    :bolt::bolt::bolt:
     
  29. HollywoodLeo

    HollywoodLeo Well-Known Member

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    But were they winning teams because he was on them? Or did he just receive the luck of the draw?

    I think Eckstein's overrated.

    People like him because he's "scrappy" and "gutsy" and is a "gamer" and a lot of other meaningless adjectives that people place on someone who isn't that good but has a good character and gives it his all.

    I'd still take him, though, over what's currently on our roster.
     
  30. BoltzRule

    BoltzRule Well-Known Member

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    We're waiting because that's when the FAs are cheaper.
     

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