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Polar Bear Thread

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by wrbanwal, Oct 11, 2008.

  1. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    http://www.polarbearsinternational.org/



    Polar Bear Status Report
    Polar bears are a potentially endangered species living in the circumpolar north. They are animals which know no boundaries. They pad across the ice from Russia to Alaska, from Canada to Greenland and onto Norway's Svalbard archipelago. No adequate census exists on which to base a worldwide population estimate, but biologists use a working figure of 20,000 to 25,000 bears with about sixty percent of those living in Canada.

    In areas where long-term studies are available, populations are showing signs of stress due to shrinking sea ice. Canada's Western Hudson Bay population has dropped 22% since the early 1980s. The declines have been directly linked to an earlier ice break-up on Hudson Bay. A long-term study of the Southern Beaufort Sea population, which spans the northern coast of Alaska and western Canada, has revealed a decline in cub survival rates and in the weight and skull size of adult males. Such declines were observed in Western Hudson Bay bears prior to the population drop there. Another population listed as declining is Baffin Bay. According to the most recent report from the Polar Bear Specialist Group, the harvest levels from Nunavut when combined with those from Greenland (which were thought to be much lower than they actually are) has resulted in this shared population being in a non-sustainable harvest situation, meaning the population is at great risk of a serious decline. The harvest is thought to be several times above what is sustainable.

    The IUCN Polar Bear Specialist Group reclassified the polar bear as a vulnerable species on the IUCN's Red List of Endangered Species at their most recent meeting (Seattle, 2005). They reported that of the 19 subpopulations of polar bears, five are declining, five are stable, two are increasing, and seven have insufficient data on which to base a decision. On May 14, 2008, the U.S. Department of the Interior reclassified the polar bear as a Threatened Species under the Endangered Species Act, citing concerns about sea ice loss. Canada and Russia list the polar bear as a "species of concern."

    Some Native communities in Canada have been reporting increasing numbers of polar bears on land. Traditional hunters believe this indicates an increased population, although the increased presence on land may, in fact, be related to shrinking sea ice and changes in the bears' distribution patterns. Data is needed to understand the change. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service states, "In the declining polar bear population of Canada's Western Hudson Bay, extensive scientific studies have indicated that the increased observation of bears on land is a result of changing distribution patterns and a result of changes in the accessibility of sea ice habitat."

    Climate change is the main threat to polar bears today. A diminishing ice pack directly affects polar bears, as sea ice is the platform from which they hunt seals. Although the Arctic has experienced warm periods before, the present shrinking of the Arctic's sea ice is rapid and unprecedented.

    In the 1960s and 1970s, hunting was the major threat to the bears. At the time, polar bears were under such severe survival pressure from hunters that a landmark international accord was reached, despite the tensions and suspicions of the Cold War. The International Agreement on the Conservation of Polar Bears was signed in Oslo, November 15, 1973 by the five nations with polar bear populations: Canada, Denmark (Greenland, Norway, the U.S., and the former U.S.S.R.

    The polar bear nations agreed to prohibit random, unregulated sport hunting of polar bears and to outlaw hunting the bears from aircraft and icebreakers as had been common practice. The agreement also obliged each nation to protect polar bear denning areas and migration patterns and to conduct research relating to the conservation and management of polar bears. Finally, the nations agreed to share their polar bear research findings with each other. Member scientists of the Polar Bear Specialist Group now meet every three to four years under the auspices of the IUCN World Conservation Union to coordinate their research on polar bears throughout the Arctic.

    The Oslo agreement was one of the first and most successful international conservation measures enacted in the 20th century. Its legacy continues today, with member scientists from each nation continuing to work together in face new threats to the bears including climate change, pollution, industrial activities, and poaching.
     
  2. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Shameless bolt bucks post... :lol:
     
  3. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    :lol::lol::lol:


    BUSTED!!


    :lol::lol::lol:
     
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  4. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    I am so proud of you right now.... :icon_rofl:
     
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  5. sdchrger

    sdchrger Well-Known Member

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    Why don't you two get a room? <- Look Leo a question mark.


    :abq1::abq2::abq1:
     
  6. Lightning's Girl

    Lightning's Girl Mod Chick =) Staff Member Moderator

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    Pleeeeeeeeeeease tell me you're not gonna turn into one of those eco-Nazis...........
     
  7. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    :no:

    check out Conc's above post


    :lol::lol::lol:
     
  8. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/08/science/earth/08polar.html


    WASHINGTON, Sept. 7 — Two-thirds of the world’s polar bears will disappear by 2050, even under moderate projections for shrinking summer sea ice caused by greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, government scientists reported on Friday.


    The finding is part of a yearlong review of the effects of climate and ice changes on polar bears to help determine whether they should be protected under the Endangered Species Act. Scientists estimate the current polar bear population at 22,000.

    The report, which the United States Geological Survey released here, offers stark prospects for polar bears as the world grows warmer.

    The scientists concluded that, while the bears were not likely to be driven to extinction, they would be largely relegated to the Arctic archipelago of Canada and spots off the northern Greenland coast, where summer sea ice tends to persist even in warm summers like this one, a shrinking that could be enough to reduce the bear population by two-thirds.

    The bears would disappear entirely from Alaska, the study said.

    “As the sea ice goes, so goes the polar bear,” said Steven Amstrup, lead biologist for the survey team.

    The report was released as President Bush was in Australia meeting with Asian leaders to try to agree on a strategy to address global warming. Mr. Bush will be host to major industrial nations in Washington this month to discuss the framework for a treaty on climate change.

    The United Nations plans to devote its general assembly in the fall to global warming.

    A spokeswoman for the White House declined to comment on the report, saying it was part of decision making at the Interior Department, parent of the survey.

    In the report, the team said, “Sea ice conditions would have to be substantially better than even the most conservative computer simulations of warming and sea ice” to avoid the anticipated drop in bear population.

    In a conference call with reporters, the scientists also said the momentum to a warmer world with less Arctic sea ice — and fewer bears — would be largely unavoidable at least for decades, no matter what happened with emissions of heat-trapping gases like carbon dioxide.

    “Despite any mitigation of greenhouse gases, we’re going to see the same amount of energy in the system for 20, 30 or 40 years,” said Mark Myers, the survey director. “We would not expect to see any significant change in polar conditions regardless of mitigation.”

    In other words, even in the unlikely event that all the major economies were to agree to rapid and drastic reductions in emissions of carbon dioxide and other heat-trapping gases, the floating Arctic ice cap will continue to shrink at a rapid pace for the next 50 years, wiping out much of the bears’ habitat.

    The report makes no recommendation on listing the bears as a threatened species or taking any action to slow ice cap damage. Such decisions are up to another Interior Department agency, the Fish and Wildlife Service, which enforces the Endangered Species Act. That decision is due in January, officials have said. The wildlife agency had to make a determination on the status of a threatened species because of a suit by environmental groups like Greenpeace and the Natural Resources Defense Council.

    In some places, the bears have adapted to eating a wide range of food like snow geese and garbage. But the survey team said their fate was 84 percent linked to the extent of sea ice.

    Separate studies of trends in Arctic sea ice by academic and government teams have solidified a picture of shrinking area in summers for decades to come.

    A fresh analysis by scientists of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, to be published Saturday in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, says sea-ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean will decline by more than 40 percent before the summer of 2050, compared with the average ice extent from 1979 to 1999.

    This summer the ice retreated much farther and faster than in any year since satellite tracking began in 1979, several Arctic research groups said.
     
  9. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    Sarah says this is BS. :icon_banana: :icon_banana:
     
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  10. Game123

    Game123 Well-Known Member

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    Polar bears taste like chicken.
     
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  11. Lightning's Girl

    Lightning's Girl Mod Chick =) Staff Member Moderator

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    *SNORT*

    :icon_rofl::icon_rofl::icon_rofl:
     
  12. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Polar Bear Population Struggles as Sea Ice Melts


    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=18121378






    As global warming shrinks the Arctic sea ice, polar bears' habitat is literally melting. This climate change impact on polar bears — the largest land carnivore — may soon spark the federal government to decide to add them to the endangered species list.

    It would be the first time that a species was listed because of climate change, and polar bear experts say the nature of the threat gives polar bear lovers around the globe a chance to pitch in to help save them.

    In for Some Bad Times

    The only place most people will ever get to see a polar bear is in a zoo. At the Pittsburgh Zoo, you can walk through a glass tunnel to the middle of the bears' swimming pool.

    Some people see polar bears as fluffy friends, others as fierce predators. But there's no disputing that the bears are extremely popular, and when visitors stop by, the zoo has handouts at the ready. They explain how reducing energy use and recycling can cut the greenhouse gas pollution that contributes to global warming and benefit polar bears.

    "While they're here, we're trying to educate people about the bears and what you can do to help these animals," said Henry Kacprzyk, a zoo curator. "A lot of people don't understand. The Arctic's really in for some bad times."

    Scientists predict that two-thirds of the world's polar bears will disappear by the middle of the century. That's because the summertime sea ice is rapidly melting.

    Studies show that bears have drowned because the shrinking ice cover means they have to swim longer distances. Cubs in northern Alaska aren't surviving at nearly the rate of recent decades, and more bears are spending summers on land — even denning there. Land isn't the best place for the bears because they're cut off from their main food source. Their ideal habitat is floating slabs of ice, which teem with fish and the bear's favorite meal — seals — according to Rosa Meehan, who heads the marine mammal program for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Alaska.

    More time on land also increases the chance for polar bears to encounter people.

    "Polar bears are curious. If there's a new smell, new activity, new noise — it might be something to eat — they'll just go over and investigate," Meehan said.

    And that can be deadly for people and bears.

    There's also a risk to polar bears from expanding oil production, Meehan added.

    Next month, the federal government plans to sell off-shore leases for 30 million acres of the Chukchi Sea, where about one-tenth of the world's polar bears live.

    Improving over the Long Term

    But scientists say the biggest threat facing the polar bear is global warming.

    Unfortunately, for the next few decades, no matter what people do to counteract climate change, the summer sea ice will continue to decline dramatically, Meehan said.

    "Even if we all stop driving our cars today, we're not going to have a lot of change in the near term," Meehan said.

    But, she says, cutting greenhouse gas pollution now and in the future will improve the polar bears' long-term outlook.

    "We want to do everything we can to essentially help the polar bears through this very difficult period, so that polar bears persist and that, when things turn around as a result of society making changes, the polar bears will still be in the environment and be able to take advantage of, hopefully, a rebuilding of the sea ice and a rebuilding of the ice ecosystem," Meehan said.

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service had been expected earlier this month to decide whether to list the bears as a threatened species. Now officials say they expect to decide by early February.

    Making Changes

    Back at the Pittsburgh Zoo, some visitors say they've already gotten the message.

    Jim Gessler has been visiting polar bears here since he was a child. Concern about their fate has pushed him to do what he can about climate change.

    "I'm turning off lights when I leave the room. I don't have a car anymore," Gessler said.

    His daughter, Ann Gessler, 22, has given up meat.

    "How much energy it takes to produce a hamburger is really distressing," she said.

    She says many people think you have to buy something expensive, such as a hybrid car, to help the environment.

    "But if you just make small changes in your lifestyle, that's a lot more beneficial," she added.

    But polar bear biologists say that, in addition to individual actions like these, saving the polar bear will require governments around the globe to make major efforts to cut greenhouse gas pollution.


    Shameless, I know

    :lol:
     
  13. in_a_days

    in_a_days dgaf

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    IAD supports Polar Bears and post padding. :tup:
     
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  14. Lightning's Girl

    Lightning's Girl Mod Chick =) Staff Member Moderator

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    I support hamburger!!
     
  15. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    word, where's the beef??
     
  16. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/species/mammals/polar_bear/background.html


    SAVING THE POLAR BEAR: BACKGROUND

    The Center has been working on behalf of polar bears since 2001, when we successfully challenged the Bush administration’s suppression of a report implicating its plans for opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas development for likely violation of an international treaty requiring protection of polar bear habitat. The administration continued to press for oil and gas drilling in increasingly precious polar bear habitat, however, and the Center continued to fight those plans. Most recently, we blocked Bush administration designs on drilling in the Beaufort Sea, which threatened to harm polar bears and other marine animals in coastal waters off the Arctic Refuge.

    We’re at the forefront of the fight to protect polar bears and their habitat from the direst threat to their continued existence: global warming. As greenhouse gas emissions drive global warming at unprecedented rates, Arctic sea ice — critical to nearly every aspect of polar bear survival — melts earlier and more extensively each decade. The rate of summer sea-ice decline is so dramatic that leading researchers believe the Arctic could be completely devoid of ice in the summer as early as 2030. And even without that vanishing act, scientists predict that global warming will result in a shortening of the polar bear’s hunting season and a decrease in the sea-ice platform from which it stalks its primary prey, ringed seals, along with a decrease in winter fat stores and access to maternal denning sites. Recent cases of polar bear starvation and stranding at sea have already been documented and are likely to become more common as Arctic temperatures continue to rise rapidly.

    When the bear was finally listed as threatened, in response to our petition and lawsuits, in March 2008, Bush-appointed Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne announced the listing would not affect climate change policy and assured the public that polar bears did not need the habitat protections of the Endangered Species Act because those afforded the bear by another law, the Marine Mammal Protection Act, would suffice.

    Then, in a bait-and-switch that wouldn’t fool a three-year-old, Interior waived Marine Mammal Protection Act safeguards for polar bears and walruses in the Chukchi Sea — effectively giving oil industries a blank check to harass the area’s wildlife. The Center was already gearing up for a lawsuit to protect polar bears from government-sanctioned oil development in both the Chukchi and Beaufort seas, and has also sought to intervene in a hunting-group lawsuit challenging the bear’s protected status. In October 2008, our lawsuit challenging the weakness of the polar bear’s protections reaped a partial settlement requiring the Interior Secretary to designate critical habitat and issue guidelines on non-lethal strategies to deal with bears that pose a threat to humans.

    The Center’s full-court-press media campaign for the polar bear helped shine an international spotlight on the bear’s plight and galvanize public opinion across the United States in support of its protection. As the administration continued its suppression of climate science, we fought in the courts to ensure that the best science on global warming sees the light of day; we pushed for more responsible national energy policies and drastic reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. We continue to defend the integrity of the Endangered Species Act so that it can fulfill its purpose in protecting all imperiled species, including the polar bear.
     
  17. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    APRIL 30, 2008

    LA TIMES

    Judge says U.S. must decide whether
    polar bears are endangered species
    By Kenneth R. Weiss
    Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
    The polar bear makes its living hunting
    arctic seals when ice covers the polar
    seas. As the ice has retreated for longer
    periods every spring and summer, the
    fasting period for the bears has grown
    longer, weakening them and disrupting
    their reproduction.
    Scientists have documented bears
    that have resorted to cannibalism and
    drowned between large gaps in the
    ice. In addition, reproductive rates for
    females and survival rates for cubs
    have declined, according to studies.
    The U.S. Geological Survey predicts
    that two-thirds of the polar bears may
    vanish with their melting habitat by
    2050.
    The Interior Department today issued a statement, but declined to tip its hand. “We have received the court’s decision
    and are reviewing it,” said Shane Wolfe, the department’s spokesman. “We will evaluate the legal options
    and will decide the appropriate course of action.”
    Regardless of what Interior decides, lawyers for conservation groups said

    APRIL 30, 2008
    A federal judge, in setting a May 15 deadline for a decision, rejects the Bush administration’s plea for additional time. The order is a victory for 3 environmental groups.


    A federal judge in Oakland has ordered
    the Interior Department to decide by
    May 15 if the polar bear should be
    protected as an endangered species
    because of melting sea ice due to global
    warming.
    U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken
    decided, in a ruling released today,
    that government failed to meet the
    deadline of Jan. 9, a legal requirement
    under the Endangered Species Act. She
    dismissed the Bush administration’s
    plea to give it until June 30, saying
    offi cials offered “no specifi c facts that
    would justify the existing delay, much
    less further delay.”
    To give the administration more time,
    the judge wrote, “would violate the
    mandated listing deadlines under
    the [Endangered Species Act] and
    congressional intent that time is of the
    essence in listing threatened species.”
    Wilken’s decision is a victory for three
    conservation groups that petitioned
    the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,
    an agency of the Interior Department,
    to protect the polar bear as a species
    threatened with extinction because of
    receding sea ice.

    The polar bear makes its living hunting
    arctic seals when ice covers the polar
    seas. As the ice has retreated for longer
    periods every spring and summer, the
    fasting period for the bears has grown
    longer, weakening them and disrupting
    their reproduction.
    Scientists have documented bears
    that have resorted to cannibalism and
    drowned between large gaps in the
    ice. In addition, reproductive rates for
    females and survival rates for cubs
    have declined, according to studies.
    The U.S. Geological Survey predicts
    that two-thirds of the polar bears may
    vanish with their melting habitat by
    2050.
    The Interior Department today issued a
    statement, but declined to tip its hand.
    “We have received the court’s decision
    and are reviewing it,” said Shane
    Wolfe, the department’s spokesman.
    “We will evaluate the legal options
    and will decide the appropriate course
    of action.”
    Regardless of what Interior decides,
    lawyers for conservation groups said

    they believe that mounting scientific
    evidence would make it easy to persuade
    a judge that an endangered species
    listing is warranted.
    Kassie Siegel, who wrote the initial
    petition for the Center for Biological
    Diversity, called the upcoming decision
    “the first step toward saving the polar
    bear and the entire Arctic ecosystem
    from global warming.”
    The Center for Biological Diversity,
    Greenpeace and the Natural Resources
    Defense Council said they sought
    he listing in part to force the Bush
    administration to take more serious steps
    toward combating global warming, such
    as imposing federal limits on greenhouse
    gas emissions.
    When the department missed the January
    deadline, these groups sued to force
    action.
    The polar bear listing comes as the
    Bush administration is moving to open
    to new oil and gas drilling prime polar
    bear habitat in the Chukchi Sea off
    Alaska’s north coast. Under questioning

    rom members of Congress, Interior
    Department officials have asserted that
    the delay on the polar bear listing and
    the movement toward new drilling are
    not connected.
    Moreover, the Bush administration and
    global warming skeptics, such as Sen.
    James M. Inhofe (R-Oklahoma) have
    argued that the effort to list the polar
    bear as endangered is part of an agenda
    by environmentalists to thwart new
    coal-fired power plants needed to meet
    America’s growing energy needs.
     
  18. sdchrger

    sdchrger Well-Known Member

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    You know that if you were to be a better bettor, you wouldn't have to go thru all of this.


    I just wanted to write "better bettor" :yes:
     
  19. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    :lol::lol::lol:


    I've given away more vCash than I've lost


    :icon_shrug::icon_shrug::icon_shrug:
     
  20. sdchrger

    sdchrger Well-Known Member

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    I haven't been seeing any come my way. :no:


    Ya know, I could be persuaded into being nice to you for up to an entire week, if the price was right. :yes:
     
  21. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    YOU were one of the first peeps I donated to!!!


    :icon_shrug:

    :icon_tease::icon_tease::icon_tease:


    PS. I might be persuaded to make a bet you CAN'T BE NICE!!!!

    :lol::lol::lol:
     
  22. sdchrger

    sdchrger Well-Known Member

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    Dude that was months ago. Old farts like you aren't supposed to remember what they had for breakfast, let alone altruistic endeavors months in the past.

    As to my ability to be nice, I can be but only when properly motivated. :icon_banana::icon_banana::icon_banana:
     
  23. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    Prolly years!!

    :lol::lol::lol:


    But, facts are facts!!!


    :icon_tease:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  24. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    http://www.polarbearsinternational.org/bear-facts/

    Polar Bear Status Report
    Polar bears are a potentially endangered species living in the circumpolar north. They are animals which know no boundaries. They pad across the ice from Russia to Alaska, from Canada to Greenland and onto Norway's Svalbard archipelago. No adequate census exists on which to base a worldwide population estimate, but biologists use a working figure of 20,000 to 25,000 bears with about sixty percent of those living in Canada.

    In areas where long-term studies are available, populations are showing signs of stress due to shrinking sea ice. Canada's Western Hudson Bay population has dropped 22% since the early 1980s. The declines have been directly linked to an earlier ice break-up on Hudson Bay. A long-term study of the Southern Beaufort Sea population, which spans the northern coast of Alaska and western Canada, has revealed a decline in cub survival rates and in the weight and skull size of adult males. Such declines were observed in Western Hudson Bay bears prior to the population drop there. Another population listed as declining is Baffin Bay. According to the most recent report from the Polar Bear Specialist Group, the harvest levels from Nunavut when combined with those from Greenland (which were thought to be much lower than they actually are) has resulted in this shared population being in a non-sustainable harvest situation, meaning the population is at great risk of a serious decline. The harvest is thought to be several times above what is sustainable.

    The IUCN Polar Bear Specialist Group reclassified the polar bear as a vulnerable species on the IUCN's Red List of Endangered Species at their most recent meeting (Seattle, 2005). They reported that of the 19 subpopulations of polar bears, five are declining, five are stable, two are increasing, and seven have insufficient data on which to base a decision. On May 14, 2008, the U.S. Department of the Interior reclassified the polar bear as a Threatened Species under the Endangered Species Act, citing concerns about sea ice loss. Canada and Russia list the polar bear as a "species of concern."

    Some Native communities in Canada have been reporting increasing numbers of polar bears on land. Traditional hunters believe this indicates an increased population, although the increased presence on land may, in fact, be related to shrinking sea ice and changes in the bears' distribution patterns. Data is needed to understand the change. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service states, "In the declining polar bear population of Canada's Western Hudson Bay, extensive scientific studies have indicated that the increased observation of bears on land is a result of changing distribution patterns and a result of changes in the accessibility of sea ice habitat."

    Climate change is the main threat to polar bears today. A diminishing ice pack directly affects polar bears, as sea ice is the platform from which they hunt seals. Although the Arctic has experienced warm periods before, the present shrinking of the Arctic's sea ice is rapid and unprecedented.

    In the 1960s and 1970s, hunting was the major threat to the bears. At the time, polar bears were under such severe survival pressure from hunters that a landmark international accord was reached, despite the tensions and suspicions of the Cold War. The International Agreement on the Conservation of Polar Bears was signed in Oslo, November 15, 1973 by the five nations with polar bear populations: Canada, Denmark (Greenland, Norway, the U.S., and the former U.S.S.R.

    The polar bear nations agreed to prohibit random, unregulated sport hunting of polar bears and to outlaw hunting the bears from aircraft and icebreakers as had been common practice. The agreement also obliged each nation to protect polar bear denning areas and migration patterns and to conduct research relating to the conservation and management of polar bears. Finally, the nations agreed to share their polar bear research findings with each other. Member scientists of the Polar Bear Specialist Group now meet every three to four years under the auspices of the IUCN World Conservation Union to coordinate their research on polar bears throughout the Arctic.

    The Oslo agreement was one of the first and most successful international conservation measures enacted in the 20th century. Its legacy continues today, with member scientists from each nation continuing to work together in face new threats to the bears including climate change, pollution, industrial activities, and poaching.


    :bolt::bolt::bolt:
     
  25. wrbanwal

    wrbanwal Well-Known Member

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    http://www.nwf.org/polarbearsandglobalwarming/?&s_src=GoogleAdwords

    Polar Bears and Global Warming

    In 2007, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed to list the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. The Endangered Species Act, enacted in 1973, is the nation's primary tool for conserving imperiled plants and animals.

    The Secretary of Interior listed the polar bear as threatened but restricted the Endangered Species Act's protections and thus the polar bear's future is still very much in jeopardy. See the news story from May 14, 2008 about the polar bear listing.

    The Endangered Species Act's ultimate goal is to recover threatened and endangered species to the point where they no longer need the law's protections.

    The chief threat to the polar bear is the loss of its sea ice habitat due to global warming. However, the polar bear is also stressed by other human activity, particularly oil and gas development activities in its habitat.

    According to scientists, saving wildlife from the threat of global warming requires more than reducing global warming pollution. To help wildlife cope with the stress caused by climate change, natural resource managers must take action to reduce non-climatic stressors. In the case of the polar bear, this means that natural resource managers must limit oil and gas development in the polar bear's habitat. The Alaskan polar bear population relies heavily on the Arctic coastal plain for denning. It also relies on the ice on the Beaufort and Chukchi seas for both denning and hunting. Both of these habitat areas are threatened by increasing oil and gas development. Although the polar bear is now listed as a threatened species, the Secretary of Interior limited certain protections for the polar bear and will allow oil and gas development to continue in important polar bear habitat.

    How To Help

    *

    To save the polar bear from extinction, the U.S. must enact strong legislation that reduces the greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming. Individuals can help by reducing their personal energy use and by advocating for legislative action on global warming at the federal, state and local levels. To avoid the worst impacts of global warming, lawmakers must enact policies that reduce U.S. global warming pollution 2% per year, leading to about an 80% reduction by mid-century.
    *

    As Arctic sea ice disappears, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge on the Arctic coastal plain will become increasingly important for the polar bear. The Refuge has the highest concentration of on-shore denning polar bears in the Alaskan Arctic. This area should not be opened to oil and gas or any other development that would degrade essential polar bear habitat. The National Wildlife Federation has worked hard to protect the Refuge. Stand up for the Arctic Refuge today!
    *

    Wildlife species are ill-prepared to meet the threat of global warming’s rapid and disruptive climate changes. Support NWF's conservation efforts by symbolically adopting a Polar Bear today.
    * Take the Good Neighbor pledge today! Do your part to help reduce global warming and help cool the planet one home at a time.




    Polar Bear Threatened Listing Weakened by Contradictions
    Administration Still Running Away from Reality
    Published May 14, 2008

    WASHINGTON, DC (May 14, 2008) – Today the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) issued its decision to list the polar bear as “threatened” under the Endangered Species Act. The decision comes only under court order and more than three years after the FWS was first petitioned to protect polar bears.

    John Kostyack, executive director of wildlife conservation and global warming with the National Wildlife Federation, said today:

    “I’m relieved the Fish and Wildlife Service finally did the right thing in giving the polar bear the protection it deserves, but the contradictions attached to this decision call into question the administration’s intent.

    “Despite the acknowledgement that the polar bear is threatened, the administration disturbingly states that there is insufficient data to establish a causal connection between industrial facilities that release global warming pollution and the disappearance of Arctic sea ice. The administration is missing the bigger picture and avoiding the gravity of the global warming crisis. The contradictions in this listing demonstrate that the administration is running away from the real consequences of its decision. This listing highlights the critical need for U.S. leadership in capping global warming pollution.

    “The administration also signaled that it would take no steps under the Endangered Species Act to protect the polar bear from the massive oil and gas development currently planned in the very heart of its habitat. But the Endangered Species Act provides crucial protections to curtail this kind of activity. Implying that existing laws are sufficient to protect threatened polar bears is simply wrong.

    “This decision should highlight for all of us the larger problem: Global warming threatens increasing numbers of wildlife species, and threatens the natural resources on which people and wildlife depend.

    “The most important next step to save the polar bear and many other wildlife species is to reduce global warming pollution by two percent a year through mid-century. The Climate Security Act expected to come before the Senate next month would put us on that path.”

    Dr. Doug Inkley, senior scientist with the National Wildlife Federation, who testified at a Senate Environment and Public Works Committee hearing on the polar bear in April, said today:

    “The plight of the polar bear is unfortunately the tip of the iceberg, an early sign of the dangers facing America’s wildlife in a warming world. Polar bears, moose, salmon and trout, many of America’s most popular birds, and more – the list of species impacted by global warming is only growing longer. Global warming is already causing problems – stronger hurricanes, rising sea level, more Western wild fires. The time to take action to reduce global warming pollution is long overdue.”

    The National Wildlife Federation is America's conservation organization inspiring Americans to protect wildlife for our children's future.
     
  26. Thumper

    Thumper WHS

    Joined:
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    Actually, they don't. :no:

    They taste similar to moose. :icon_shrug:
     
  27. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

    Ratings:
    +408
    Like other bear, I would imagine. Most I've had is pretty greasy.
     
  28. Lightning's Girl

    Lightning's Girl Mod Chick =) Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
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    Yeah, but the flavor's good:yes:
     
  29. Game123

    Game123 Well-Known Member

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    Hmmmmm...... Bears should taste somewhat like dogs since they are about 92 percent similar on the DNA sequence level.


    Would any dog eaters like to comment on this?:icon_shrug:
     
  30. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

    Ratings:
    +408
    Mmmmmmm,dog ...... you stuff with rice?? :lol:
     

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