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Something to think about!

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Game123, Jun 16, 2008.

  1. Game123

    Game123 Well-Known Member

    Apr 19, 2006

    At Charter School, Higher Teacher Pay

    A New York City charter school set to open in 2009 in Washington Heights will test one of the most fundamental questions in education: Whether significantly higher pay for teachers is the key to improving schools.

    The school, which will run from fifth to eighth grades, is promising to pay teachers $125,000, plus a potential bonus based on school wide performance. That is nearly twice as much as the average New York City public school teacher earns, roughly two and a half times the national average teacher salary and higher than the base salary of all but the most senior teachers in the most generous districts nationwide.

    The school’s creator and first principal, Zeke M. Vanderhoek, contends that high salaries will lure the best teachers. He says he wants to put into practice the conclusion reached by a growing body of research: that teacher quality — not star principals, laptop computers or abundant electives — is the crucial ingredient for success.

    “I would much rather put a phenomenal, great teacher in a field with 30 kids and nothing else than take the mediocre teacher and give them half the number of students and give them all the technology in the world,” said Mr. Vanderhoek, 31, a Yale graduate and former middle school teacher who built a test preparation company that pays its tutors far more than the competition.

    In exchange for their high salaries, teachers at the new school, the Equity Project, will work a longer day and year and assume responsibilities that usually fall to other staff members, like attendance coordinators and discipline deans. To make ends meet, the school, which will use only public money and charter school grants for all but its building, will scrimp elsewhere.

    The school will open with seven teachers and 120 students, most of them from low-income Hispanic families. At full capacity, it will have 28 teachers and 480 students. It will have no assistant principals, and only one or two social workers. Its classes will have 30 students. In an inversion of the traditional school hierarchy that is raising eyebrows among school administrators, the principal will start off earning just $90,000. In place of a menu of electives to round out the core curriculum, all students will take music and Latin. Period.

    [end clipped story... more at the web link]
  2. Thumper

    Thumper WHS

    Aug 24, 2005
    More money should go into schools.

    It'll pay off in so many ways over the long run.
  3. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

    Good teachers, IMO, should be among the highest earners in the country. They have the ability to do much more good than some greedy corporate CEO.

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