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Targets for the Chargers Draft

Discussion in 'Chargers Fan Forum' started by Bolt Bot, Apr 15, 2006.

  1. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    Targets ?

    The targets better be BIG FAT BOYS aka BEEF.

    Is a BOT a poster or an automated thingy ?
     
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  2. Thumper

    Thumper WHS

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    Bolt Bot is a bot poster that just posts articles based on what critiria I set. And I agree with you big time the we need some BEEF on the OL. I'd love to get at least another starter and some serious quality depth.
     
  3. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    I am not sure what a BOT is to be honest but I think I get it. It is not a real person to respond to me or quotes.

    Ideally we need a swing tackle. Someone who can play left or right tackle because if Shane or Oben goes down - sayonara bay-bee.

    Then I would like some guards who can move their junk on the pulling plays or stretch plays. They need to haul buns and block liked raped apes.

    Our O-Line depth is non-existant and this is where the WAR is either WON or LOST.
     
  4. Thumper

    Thumper WHS

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    Exactly, it's not a real person, just an automated program that looks for articles to post.
    This is what I've been saying. We need some big boys that can move. The O-Line is like the foundation of a house. With out a good one, everything crumbles.
     
  5. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    A.J. made a comment to LaDainian that his career would not be wasted. The clock is ticking and we have this and the next season to make an impact or brother - it is going to get ugly.

    This is why we must cherish these next two seasons as though it were the last ones forever here in San Diego.
     
  6. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/16/s...d=1&ei=5087&en=1d1a805676d0f4ff&ex=1145419200

    April 16, 2006
    No Dodging the Hype as Draft Day Nears
    By JOHN BRANCH

    So much happened during the spin cycle from January to April, yet none of it seemed to matter for quarterback Vince Young.

    At the beginning, Young's performance for Texas in the Rose Bowl caused talent scouts to place him immediately at the head of the N.F.L.'s draft class, next to Southern California running back Reggie Bush, though neither had announced plans to leave college after their junior seasons.

    On April 7, Young was paraded around the Texans' gleaming facility in Houston, feted with a news conference and handed fistfuls of team gear as he left.

    But in the days between, his reputation repeatedly dipped and arced: rocked by sudden doubts about everything from his arm motion to his intelligence, then rejuvenated by an impressive throwing exhibition in front of an estimated 130 N.F.L. team officials at the University of Texas.

    Young's turbulent venture is typical of the process for many potential draft picks. The months between the last college football game and the first pick of the draft — April 29 this year — are flooded with the murky waters of hype and spin, which sometimes threaten to drown out talent and ability.

    All it takes to change the perception of a player is a good time in the 40-yard dash or a bad score on an aptitude exam, whispers of a dazzling workout in front of scouts or damaging gossip floated by someone with an agenda. At stake are millions of dollars in contracts and, possibly, the long-range championship aspirations of franchises.

    In the end, the biggest draft question is not just who will be chosen by whom. It is also whether the preceding buzz really matters, or whether the past few months have been little more than an alluring sideshow for the news media and fans.

    "You focus nothing on the media coverage of the ups and downs," Texans General Manager Charley Casserly said in a telephone interview. "You make your own evaluation. It's totally ignored."

    Others are less dismissive. To them, the swings of speculation are something to watch, if not follow.

    "In a perfect world, we would be more even-keeled," Green Bay General Manager Ted Thompson said. "But I will say that we all get carried away with the numbers sometimes and chase the ghosts."

    Teams, of course, direct the draft hype, too. The day before Young visited the Texans, Bush was their guest. Each was marched through the headquarters and trotted before cameras and reporters. The Texans will select only one of them — or, perhaps, neither.

    Asked if teams, in general, use smokescreens to hide their intentions, Casserly said: "There is an element of that in this, no question. There always has been."

    Predicting the draft is a foggy endeavor. It entails trying to assess the strengths and weaknesses of hundreds of college football players, and matching them with the mostly private thoughts and perceived needs of 32 N.F.L. teams in a preordained draft order.

    This exercise befuddles even those paid as draft analysts. Three weeks before last year's draft, Mel Kiper Jr. of ESPN, the most famous of the lot, predicted correctly two of the first 21 actual selections. The player many thought would be chosen first, California quarterback Aaron Rodgers, was selected 24th — and received a contract with a reported $18.6 million less in guaranteed money than that of the top pick.

    But an inability to solve the draft puzzle does not slow — and may inspire — the fascination that manifests itself in everything from talk-radio rants and numbing blogger analysis to draft-specific magazines and hours of scuttlebutt on "SportsCenter."

    Helping whet the appetite for draft news is a cast of agents, general managers, scouts and other so-called experts, each with a motive to draw or to deflect attention, to inform or to confuse. "This is the 'World Series of Poker' meets sports," the agent Don Yee said. "It is reality TV at its finest."

    Players manipulate the system by choosing how and when to perform. The top prospects often skip the N.F.L. scouting combine in February, seeing little advantage in competing against hundreds of others. Instead, they force teams to come to them to witness well-scripted workouts.

    In extreme cases, players warn specific teams that they will not play for them, as Archie Manning did two years ago with the San Diego Chargers in steering his quarterback son Eli to the Giants.

    Teams, while guarding their draft-day intentions, invite players to their headquarters for tours, interviews, testing and hobnobbing. Some invite reporters; others try to keep the visits secret, further muddying their motives.

    Agents, who get a cut of their clients' contracts, try to attract attention for their players — "I'm just a carnival barker," the agent Gary Wichard said — and steer them through the humbling analysis. The search for the perfect draft choice is largely a search for imperfections.

    "Players get destroyed," the agent Ben Dogra said. "You could say you're going to draft the pope, and someone would say he's too old. Draft Santa Claus, and someone would say he wouldn't fit down the chimney."

    Riding shotgun are the news media and the fans, who hyperanalyze and spread every tidbit of information, much of it floated anonymously.

    "There's not much of a governing body here," said U.S.C. Coach Pete Carroll, a former Jets coach. "It's gamesmanship. This is competition for everybody."

    Two years ago, U.S.C. defensive lineman Kenechi Udeze was widely considered a top-10 draft pick. Weeks before the draft, concerns over a past shoulder injury arose quietly after word spread that Udeze had skipped a medical evaluation. Carroll called teams to assure them that Udeze was healthy, but he fell to No. 19.

    That is the way players are categorized in the symmetry of the draft: some rise, others fall. Some bristle at such barometers.

    "Players will ask, 'Am I moving up?' " the agent Ethan Lock said. "And I say: 'From where? Where were you?' Moses hasn't come down and said where they rank. There is not a unified draft board in the sky."

    Most teams do not sit down to rank the players and match them with their needs until April, some not in earnest until two weeks before the draft. Until then, the speculation has little context.

    "Obviously, some of the rumors out there are true and some are not," said James Harris, the Jacksonville Jaguars' vice president for player personnel. "I imagine people hear about some of the workouts, then I imagine that some of the agents put information out there so that their player's stock appears to be on the rise. Then somebody doesn't run well, so his stock supposedly drops. But for us, it's more of a process."

    Teams have armies of scouts; the Giants, for example, list 15 scouts and personnel evaluators working behind General Manager Ernie Accorsi. Gil Brandt, the former vice president for player personnel for Dallas and now an nfl.com contributor, said team analysis is far more comprehensive than anything performed by draftniks. The perceived spikes and dips of players tend to be much smoother arcs in the teams' eyes.

    "By and large, the grade that the full-time scouts give to players, they are pretty on the money," Brandt said.

    Still, there is some truth to the postseason, predraft hype; if the months of analysis meant nothing, the draft could be held in January.

    Last year, DeMarcus Ware, a little-known defensive end from Troy University, was said to have had a strong Senior Bowl and a good performance at the combine. In mock drafts, he climbed steadily from a projected middle-round choice to a possible first-rounder. The gossip underestimated his value; on draft day, the Cowboys chose Ware with the 11th pick.

    This year, LenDale White, the bullish U.S.C. running back, may be caught in a bear market. Widely considered a top-15 choice in January, concerns about his weight and speed — and last week, reports of a hamstring tear — have led most prognosticators to drop him to the second round.

    Rumors further the perception. Most Web sites devoted to the draft base their analysis on anonymous sources. The reports often have a gossipy tone, ranging from speculation about strength of workout performances to strength of character. Several recent reports said Florida's Chad Jackson had passed Ohio State's Santonio Holmes as the top receiver in the draft. They did not say by whose measure. But in the N.F.L draft culture, that type of speculation is common, leaving questions about the impact of such statements.

    "No impact," said Joel Segal, an agent who represents Holmes, Bush and a couple of other potential first-round picks. "Prognosticators don't impact the draft."

    Perhaps not directly, though the Packers' Thompson scans mock drafts, partly for fun, partly for clues.

    Those mock drafts have had the Texans choosing Bush since they lost their last game to San Francisco in a contest deridingly called the Bush Bowl. Only the spiked interest in Young created any second thoughts.

    Yet last Monday, the Texans played host to North Carolina State defensive end Mario Williams. Bob McNair, the team's owner, told The Houston Chronicle that Williams could have as much impact on defense as Bush would on offense; Casserly said, "He's worthy of the first pick in the draft."

    Truth or tease? Either way, it was spin. And the murky cycle continued.
     
  7. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    Find this article at:
    http://www.usatoday.com/sports/football/draft/2006-04-16-draft-science_x.htm


    History shows that high-end drafting still inexact science
    Updated 4/16/2006 10:53 PM ET
    By Paul Kuharsky, The Tennessean

    For the NFL teams that struggled the most in the fall, spring is supposed to be filled with promise.
    A top three pick in the draft can cure a lot of ills, reset a team's course, have an impact for a dozen years or more.

    But drafting is an inexact science, as NFL personnel executives constantly remind the media and fans.

    Looking back 20 years — and not yet passing subjective judgment on players who've been in the league less than four seasons — the top three picks have included at least one certifiable bust in 15 out of 17 drafts since 1986.

    Some players had hard luck with injuries (like Cincinnati Bengals running back Ki-Jana Carter) while others appeared to have been products of their college systems (like Miami running back Alonzo Highsmith with the Houston Oilers) or managed to get themselves into trouble (like Oakland Raiders defensive tackle Darrell Russell).

    Others had work ethic questions.

    Former Dallas Cowboys personnel executive Gil Brandt said he will always remember that Rick Mirer, the Notre Dame quarterback who proved to be a bust as the second pick in 1993, didn't want to serve as a holder at a college all-star game for fear of hurting his hand.

    Then there have been more straightforwardly bad picks:

    The Atlanta Falcons took Auburn linebacker Aundray Bruce first overall in 1988 and Nebraska defensive back Bruce Pickens third in 1991. The Washington Redskins tabbed Tennessee quarterback Heath Shuler third in 1994. The San Diego Chargers grabbed Washington State quarterback Ryan Leaf second in 1998.

    "I probably surprise you with how much I know about those guys just off the top of my head," said Brandt, now an analyst with NFL.com. "And I think teams know a hell of a lot more, yet we make mistakes. I don't know what the answer is.

    "One of the things that comes into the equation is, after they get money, how hard are they going to work to continue to get better? That's one of the key questions."

    It's fair to expect a top-three pick to be a permanent fixture in the lineup and the league, anchoring a position and garnering Pro Bowl invitations.

    Tennessee Titans General Manager Floyd Reese said while he and his scouts look to avoid landmines, sometimes there is simply no way to predict how a player will pan out.

    "When Tony Mandarich was drafted, I don't care what personnel people tell you, 99.9% of the GMs in the league would have drafted him at exactly the same spot," Reese said. "He was that impressive coming out. History will tell you what happened. But for people to say they saw it coming, that's a lie. He was an awesome football player."

    Reese also said he believes the bust label gets passed out too often and too easily.

    "If he doesn't come in and be rookie of the year and if he's not a 10-time Pro Bowler on the way to the Hall of Fame, it's a bust. Because you're drafting in a position where that guy is supposed to be that good. Now, does that happen? Not very often. It's very, very difficult to live up to the expectations," Reese said.

    "If you draft a guard at the third spot and there is a guard drafted at the 23rd spot that is rookie of the year, all the sudden your guard is a bust even though he may be a pretty good player and you're thrilled with him."
     
  8. Thumper

    Thumper WHS

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    AJ also made a call to Brees before he had surgery, telling him not to worry and they'd get a long term deal done. :icon_shrug:
     
  9. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    I suspect this was more a move the Chargers would extend a contract versus saying goodbye. This way Brees could get about his business.

    And indeed A.J. extended a contract. He did not have to do this and some speculate it was only done to appease the fans which is non-sense.
     
  10. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    The Chargers are eyeng this kid as well.

    http://www.registerguard.com/news/2006/04/16/d1.sp.bellamy.0416.p1.php?section=sports

    Ron Bellamy: Duck's stock has made healthy gains
    By Ron Bellamy
    Columnist, The Register-Guard
    Published: Sunday, April 16, 2006

    Since the end of the college football season, the NFL draft stock of Oregon quarterback Kellen Clemens has risen sharply.

    Three or four weeks ago, Clemens noted, most draft projections had him as a sixth-round pick. If that.

    But the latest projection by ESPN draft expert Mel Kiper Jr. has Clemens being selected in the second round, with the 48th pick, by the Minnesota Vikings.

    In Kiper's current mock draft, Clemens would be the fifth college quarterback selected, behind Matt Leinart (third to Tennessee), Vince Young (seventh to Oakland), Jay Cutler (10th to Arizona) and Brodie Croyle (44th to Baltimore).

    (Kiper also projects defensive tackle Haloti Ngata as the No. 13 pick, by Baltimore, and wide receiver Demetrius Williams as the 50th pick overall, midway through the second round, by San Diego.)

    "I look at it every once in a while," Clemens said the other day. "Mel Kiper isn't going to be the one pulling the string, but it's kind of fun to look and see that three or four weeks ago, I was going to be a guy who was hopefully going to squeeze into the sixth round or something.

    "It doesn't mean anything, but it's nice to be getting some attention and having my name mentioned in there. ... It's a heck of a lot better than where I was three weeks ago."

    And better, certainly, than his prognosis after he fractured his left fibula near the ankle, and suffered damage to ankle ligaments, in the Arizona game Oct. 22.

    "I fell off the radar after I got hurt," he said. "Everybody quit looking, quit hearing about me. I wasn't at the Senior Bowl, I wasn't at any of the all-star games."

    But Clemens recovered well enough to participate in some aspects of the NFL Scouting Combine in Indianapolis in February, and since then he's had individual workouts with coaches from more than a half-dozen teams, including the Rams, Eagles, Bengals, Chiefs, Cowboys and Falcons.

    Clemens said his injury has healed well. "I'm running on it, jumping off it, doing all the cuts," he said. "It's pretty much healthy."


    Thursday, he was in San Diego for interviews with Chargers coaches - the quarterbacks coach there is former UO assistant coach John Ramsdell - and Monday he flies to Baltimore for interviews with the Ravens. On Wednesday, he'll work out in Eugene for the Jets, his last scheduled audition before the two-day draft begins April 29.

    "Once I got to the combine and threw a little bit, I think they thought `OK, the kid is kind of healthy, and he can throw a little bit,' '' Clemens said. "But I think the thing that's really helping me right now are the interviews that I've done after the combine with teams that have come in ... and that in all the workouts I've thrown the ball well."

    In film sessions with pro coaches, Clemens has displayed a strong grasp of the position and the game.

    "They're encouraged by the diversity of coaches I've already had" - three offensive coordinators in five years - "and by the systems that I've had to learn, and quickly, in some cases," Clemens said.

    On the Wonderlic test, the 12-minute, 50-question aptitude test taken by potential draftees, Clemens scored a 35, tied with Leinart for one of the top scores in the country among quarterbacks this year.

    "For a guy who took ballroom dancing as a senior," Clemens said wryly of the USC quarterback, "he stayed pretty sharp."

    For perspective, according to Internet lists based on published reports, Eli Manning scored a 39, Tom Brady 33, Joey Harrington 32 and Ben Roethlisberger 25, close to this year's average of 24.5.

    Clemens plans to spend draft weekend with his wife, Nicole, at his parents' ranch in Burns.

    "My wife says she's going to be glued to the TV set," he said. "I won't be. I think we're going to take a (horseback) ride that morning, and then relax a little bit, play some cards and look up every 15 minutes or so and see who gets picked."

    The first three rounds of the NFL draft will be held the 29th. By the end of that day, it seems, Clemens will have looked up to the TV and seen that among those picked was him.
     
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  11. AnteaterCharger

    AnteaterCharger Calibrating Bolttalk, Podcast by Podcast Staff Member Super Moderator Podcaster

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    :tup: hey! that's my article !



    :icon_banana:
     
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  12. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    They had a link a Profootballtalk.com to this article.......:yes:
     
  13. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    Here is an interesting WR ---

    http://www.profootballtalk.com/rumormill.htm

    SAINTS SHOPPING STALLWORTH

    A league source tells us that the New Orleans Saints currently are shopping former first-round receiver Donte' Stallworth.

    Stallworth was the thirteenth overall selection in the 2002 draft. He is under contract through 2007, with base salaries of $1.92 million and $545,000 in the final seasons of his rookie deal. We're told, however, that he has met the trigger for voiding the final year of the deal, making him a free agent after the 2006 season.

    The former Tennessee star quietly had his best season in 2005, with 70 catches for 945 yards and seven touchdowns. But he has still fallen far short of the pre-draft hype that surrounded him four years ago.

    With Stallworth signed through 2006 only, anyone who trades for him will also need to sign him to an extension. Otherwise, the draft pick or player who is sacrificed will result in a one-year rental of Stallworth.

    If the Saints move Stallworth, they'll have a significant hole to fill in the starting lineup. Chris Horn has been signed in the offseason, but the team surely would have to go back to the free-agent pool (possibly in search of some post-June 1 cuts) or draft a guy who can make the kind of impact right out of the gates that most folks expected of Stallworth's NFL career.
     
  14. AnteaterCharger

    AnteaterCharger Calibrating Bolttalk, Podcast by Podcast Staff Member Super Moderator Podcaster

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    :icon_banana: :icon_banana: :icon_banana: :icon_banana: :icon_banana:

    If I could get these bananas to do a hoarah I would :tup:
     
  15. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    Keep up the good work.

    I see sports agent in your future.

    Good luck on law school. I almost enrolled in a MBA/JD program but needed or actually wanted to get to work and settled for the MBA at a ripe young age of 23.

    Talk to Rule12B at SOSD.

    He is an attorney and also a tailgate regular and a cool dude. Way cool.
     
  16. AnteaterCharger

    AnteaterCharger Calibrating Bolttalk, Podcast by Podcast Staff Member Super Moderator Podcaster

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    Thanks for the love man
    Actually law school is driving me :no: 13 applications, 8 no's, 2 waiting list and 0 Yes'es
     
  17. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    Check out National Universities school of Law ...... They have a Jurisdoctoral (J.D.) program
     
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  18. AnteaterCharger

    AnteaterCharger Calibrating Bolttalk, Podcast by Podcast Staff Member Super Moderator Podcaster

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    Waitlisted at American and William and Mary
    I don't overly plan on transfering because, first and foremost, i need to get in SOMEWHERE! :icon_smile:
    Thanks, I do like O'Callahan but yeah its less then 40% that he'll be in the fourth, we could look at him in the third though
     

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