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The history of Samhain (Sow-en)

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Concudan, Oct 31, 2008.

  1. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Samhain's History
    Samhain (pronounced Sow-en), dates back to the ancient Celts who lived 2,000 years ago. Contrary to what some believe, is not a celebration of a Celtic god of the dead. Instead, it is a Celtic word meaning "summer's end." The Celts believed that summer came to an end on October 31st and the New Year began on November 1st with the start of winter. But the Celts also followed a lunar calendar and their celebrations began at sunset the night before.

    Many today see Halloween as the pagan holiday. But that's not really accurate. As the pagan holiday of Samhain is on November 1st. But their celebrations did and still do, start at sunset on October 31st, on Samhain Eve. During the day on October 31st, the fires within the home are extinguished. Often families would engage in a good "fall" cleaning to clear out the old and make way for the new. Starting the winter months with fresh and clean household items.

    At sunset on October 31, clans or local villages begin the formal ceremonies of Samhain by lighting a giant bonfire. The people would gather around the fire to burn crops and animals as sacrifices to the Celtic deities. It was a method of giving the Gods and Goddesses their share of the previous years herd or crops. In addition these sacred fires were a big part of the cleansing of the old year and a method to prepare for the coming new year.

    During the celebration, the Celts wore costumes, and danced around the bonfire. Many of these dances told stories or played out the cycles of life and death or commemorated the cycle of Wheel of Life. These costumes were adorned for three primary reasons.

    The first was to honor the dead who were allowed to rise from the Otherworld. The Celts believed that souls were set free from the land of the dead during the eve of Samhain. Those that had been trapped in the bodies of animals were released by the Lord of the Dead and sent to their new incarnations. The wearing of these costumes signified the release of these souls into the physical world.

    Not all of these souls were honored and respected. Some were also feared as they would return to the physical world and destroy crops, hide livestock or 'haunt' the living who may have done them wrong. The second reason for these traditional costumes was to hide from these malevolent spirits to escape their trickery.

    The final representation was a method to honor the Celtic Gods and Goddesses of the harvest, fields and flocks. Giving thanks and homage to those deities who assisted the village or clan through the trials and tribulations of the previous year. And to ask for their favor during the coming year and the harsh winter months that were approaching.

    In addition to celebrations and dance, it was believed that this thin veil between the physical world and the Otherworld provided extra energy for communications between the living and the dead. With these communications, Druid Priests, and Celtic Shamans would attempted to tell the fortunes of individual people through a variety of methods. For a people entirely dependent on the volatile natural world, these prophecies were an important source of comfort and direction during the long, dark winter.

    These psychic readings would be conducted with a variety of divination tools. Such as throwing bones, or casting the Celtic Ogham. There is some historical evidence that additional tools of divination were also used. Most of this comes from writings recorded by Roman invaders, but there are stories of reading tea leaves, rocks and twigs, and even simple spiritual communications that today we'd call Channeling. Some historians have suggested that these early people were the first to use tiles made from wood and painted with various images which were the precursor to Tarot Cards. There's no real evidence to support this, but the 'story' of these tiles has lingered for centuries.

    When the community celebration was over, each family would take a torch or burning ember from the sacred bonfire and return to their own home. The home fires that has been extinguished during the day were re-lit by the flame of the sacred bonfire to help protect the dwelling and it's inhabitants during the coming winter. These fires were kept burning night and day during the next several months. It was believed that if a home lost it's fire, tragedy and troubles would soon follow.

    With the hearth fires lit, the families would place food and drink outside their doors. This was done to appease the roaming spirits who might play tricks on the family.

    The Romans began to conquer the Celtic territories. By A.D. 43 they had succeeded in claiming the majority of the Celtic lands. They ruled for approximately four hundred years combining or influencing many Celtic traditional celebrations with their own. Two Roman holidays were merged with Samhain.

    1. Feralia, a day in late October when the Romans traditionally commemorated the passing of the dead.
    2. Pomona's Day of Honoring, the Roman goddess of fruit and trees. The symbol of Pomona is the apple and the incorporation of this celebration into Samhain probably explains the tradition of "bobbing" for apples that is practiced today on Halloween.
     
  2. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Samhain to Halloween
    With the coming of Christianity in the 800s AD, the early Church in England tried to Christianize the old Celtic festivals. Pope Boniface IV designated the 1st of November as "All Saints Day," honoring saints and martyrs. He also decreed October 31 as "All Hallows Eve", that eventually became Hallow'een.

    Scholars today widely accept that the Pope was attempting to replace the earlier Celtic pagan festival with a church-sanctioned holiday. As this Christian holiday spread, the name evolved as well. Also called All-hallows Eve or All-hallowmas (from Middle English Alholowmesse meaning All Saints' Day). 200 years later, in 1000 AD, the church made November 2 All Souls' Day, a day to honor the dead. It is celebrated similarly to Samhain, with big bonfires, parades, and dressing up in costumes as saints, angels, and devils. Together, the three celebrations, the eve of All Saints', All Saints', and All Souls' day, are called Hallowmas.

    The Evolution Of Halloween
    "Trick-or-treating" is a modern tradition that probably finds it's roots in the early All Souls' Day parades in England. During the festivities, poor citizens would beg for food and families would give them pastries called "soul cakes" in return for their promise to pray for the family's dead relatives. The distribution of soul cakes was encouraged by the church as a way to replace the ancient practice of leaving food and wine for roaming spirits. The practice, which was referred to as "going a-souling" was eventually taken up by children who would visit the houses in their neighborhood and be given ale, food, and money.

    "Dressing up" for Halloween gets it roots from dressing up around the sacred bonfire during the original Celtic festival. Some suggest, this practice originates from England, when it was believed that ghosts came back to the earthly world on Halloween. People thought that they would encounter ghosts if they left their homes, so to avoid being recognized people would wear masks after dark so that the ghosts would mistake them for fellow spirits. In addition, these early English people, would place bowls of food outside their homes to appease the ghosts and prevent them from attempting to enter or cause harm to their homes. A tradition obviously taken from the ancient Celtic pagans.

    As European came to America, they brought their varied Halloween traditions with them. Celebration of Halloween in colonial times was much more common in Maryland and the southern colonies. Primarily because Celtic immigrants settled more in these regions than in the north.

    As the beliefs and customs of different European ethnic groups meshed together a distinctly American version of Halloween began to emerge. The first celebrations included "play parties," public events held to celebrate the harvest, where neighbors would share stories of the dead, tell each other's fortunes, dance, and sing. Colonial Halloween festivities also featured the telling of ghost stories and mischief-making of all kinds. By the middle of the nineteenth century, annual autumn festivities were common, but Halloween was not yet celebrated everywhere in the country.

    In the second half of the nineteenth century, America entered an age of mysticism. What was more often termed spiritualism. Metaphysical groups and clubs began to spring up throughout the Golden Age and the wealthier set of Americans. At the same time, America was welcoming a new group of immigrants, especially the millions of Irish fleeing Ireland's potato famine of 1846. This new cultural influence brought with it a melding of Irish and English traditions, and a new Americans culture was born. People began to dress up in costumes and go house to house asking for food or money, a practice that eventually became today's "trick-or-treat" tradition. Young women believed that, on Halloween, they could divine the name or appearance of their future husband by doing tricks with yarn, apple parings, or mirrors.

    In the late 1800s, there was a move in America to mold Halloween into a holiday more about community and neighborly get-togethers, than about ghosts, pranks, and witchcraft. At the turn of the century, Halloween parties for both children and adults became the most common way to celebrate the day. Parties focused on games, foods of the season, and festive costumes. Parents were encouraged by newspapers and community leaders to take anything "frightening" or "grotesque" out of Halloween celebrations. Because of their efforts, Halloween lost most of its superstitious and religious overtones by the beginning of the twentieth century.

    By the 1920s and 1930s, Halloween had become a secular, but community-centered holiday, with parades and town-wide parties as the featured entertainment. Despite the best efforts of many schools and communities, vandalism began to plague Halloween celebrations in many communities during this time. By the 1950s, town leaders had successfully limited vandalism and Halloween had evolved into a holiday directed mainly at the young. Due to the high numbers of young children during the fifties baby boom, parties moved from town civic centers into the classroom or home, where they could be more easily accommodated.

    Between 1920 and 1950, the centuries-old practice of trick-or-treating was also revived. Trick-or-treating was a relatively inexpensive way for an entire community to share the Halloween celebration. In theory, families could also prevent tricks being played on them by providing the neighborhood children with small treats. A new American tradition was born, and it has continued to grow.

    By the 1990s, Americans have made Halloween one of the largest commercial holidays. Spending an estimated $6.9 billion annually on Halloween costumes, accessories, decorations and pumpkins.

    Samhain Traditions
    To pagans the world over, November 1st, still marks the beginning of the New Year. To Witches and Pagans, Samhain is the Festival of the Dead, and for many, it is the most important Sabbat (Holiday) of the year. Although the Feast of the Dead forms a major part of most Pagan celebrations on this eve, and at Samhain voluntary communications are expected and hoped for. The departed are never harassed, and their presence is never commanded. The spirits of the dead are, however, ritually invited to attend the Sabbat and to be present within the Circle.

    Orange and Black:
    The colors of this Sabbat are black and orange. Black to represent the time of darkness after the death of the God (who is represented by fire and the sun) during an earlier sabbat known as Lughnasadh, and the waning of light during the day. Orange represents the awaiting of the dawn during Yule (Dec. 21st to Jan. 1st) when the God is reborn.

    Jack O'Lanterns:
    There is some debate about the origination of Jack-o-lanterns. One line suggests this custom originated from the lighting of candles for the dead to follow as they walked the earth. These candles were placed in hallowed out gourds and put on the ground to light the way.

    Others suggest the practice originates from a Christianized Irish myth about a man nicknamed "Stingy Jack."

    Stingy Jack and the Devil enter a pub to have a drink. Jack convinces the Devil to turn himself into a coin to pay for the drinks. But instead of using the coin, Jack slipped it into his pocket and next to a silver cross. The cross prevented the Devil from changing back into his original form. But Jack eventually freed the Devil, under the condition that he would not bother Jack for one year. And if Jack should die during that year, the Devil would not claim his soul. And the Devil agreed to these terms.

    Jack again tricked the Devil. This time, the Devil climbed into a tree to pick a piece of fruit. While he was up in the tree, Jack carved a sign of the cross into the tree's bark so that the Devil could not come down. Once again, Jacked struck a bargain with the Devil. He would free the Devil from the tree if he promised not to bother Jack for ten more years. And if Jack died during those years, the Devil would not claim his soul. And the Devil again agreed to these terms.

    Not long after this, Jack did indeed died. But because of his trickery, God would not allow him into heaven. In keeping his word not to take his soul, the Devil also would not allow Jack into hell. Instead, the Devil sent Jack out into the darkness of the world between worlds with nothing but a burning piece of coal. Jack placed the coal into a carved out turnip and has been roaming the Earth ever since. The Irish began to refer to Jack's ghostly figure as "Jack of the Lantern," and then, simply as "Jack O'Lantern."


    The Irish and Scottish people began making lanterns by carving scary faces into turnips or potatoes and placing them into windows or near doors to frighten away the wandering evil spirits. In England, large beets were used. Immigrants from these countries brought the tradition to America where they found the pumpkin, a fruit native to America, that made the perfect jack o'lanterns.

    Tricks & Treats:
    Treats also originated from an old custom of leaving cookies and other foods out for those relatives to enjoy as they shared this one night of feasting. The 'trick' portion of "Trick or Treat" was an invention of the Christians. The tricks were supposedly caused by the dead who didn't receive a treat of food left for them when they arrived at your door.

    The Contraversary of Samhain and Halloween
    Sad to say there have been many fundamentalists who are inciting ignorance and bigotry into the celebrations of Halloween. No longer is Halloween a religious festival here in the US. It has become commercialized as an event for kids to have fun, play dress up and be scared by ghouls and ghosts. It has become nothing more than a secular holiday.

    Those who have tried to link Halloween to Samhain are also missing the boat. As Halloween, All Hallows Eve are Christian created holidays devised by the early Churches of Europe as a means to convert pagans to Christianity. The celebrations were indeed taken from pagan practices, but their purposes have long since been corrupted and are no longer pagan in nature. Right down to being practiced on October 31st.

    Some one asked me if I cared that a nearby town was attempting to change Halloween from October 31st to the last Friday of each October. My response is why should I mind? Halloween is a Christian holiday, do with it what you will.

    The modern celebrations of Halloween do not take away or alter the spiritual significance of Samhain for pagan practitioners. Our Sabbat is still intact and still honored with reverence and in the traditional methods practiced by our ancient pagan ancestors. Though we don't make animal sacrifices any longer, there are some who will toss a steak into a bonfire as a symbolic gesture. The main focus of the holiday for pagans is still to honor our loved ones who have passed on and to share in communication with them during this time when the veil between worlds is narrowed.
     
  3. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Samhain

    * Celebrated on November 1st as the Celtic (pagan) New Year. Festival rituals begin at sunset on October 31st.
    * Celebrated with jack o'lanterns, masks, bale fire and decorations of black and orange.
    * Honoring the Crone Goddess, relatives who live in spirit and and the renewal of the Wheel of Life.

    Samhain History
    Samhain (commonly pronounced as sow-en) is also know as Samanna, or Samhuinn and the Celtic New Year.

    For the Celts, it marks the new year and the renewal of the Wheel of Life. It is the time when the old God dies and returns to Avalon (the land of the dead) and the Old Crone goddess falls into mourning for her consort.

    In the annals of Celtic mythology (The Lebhar Gabhála Éireann), Samhain is a time when people had to pay homage to the Fomorians by giving them two-thirds of their corn, wine and even children. The Fomorians were hideous half human creatures with supernatural powers, who are seen as the "original" invaders of Ireland and it's first inhabitants, the people of Cesair. This was the first of 6 major invasions of the Celts. The first 5 of these were by Gods or supernatural beings like the Fomorians.

    Some Celtic mythological scholars see this invasion as the original inspiration for the Samhain festival. It became a time when the Cesair mourned for their children that were taken by the Fomorians. Samhain became the day when the veil between the living world and the Otherworld all but disappears and parents can communicate with their lost children. As time has passed, this opportunity for communication has grown to include all family members and even one's complete heritage.

    This concept is seen again 290+ years later during the third invasion, led by Nemed mac Agnoman. The Nemedians met no resistance from the first Celts. These mythological Gods were able to clear more plains and create more lakes for them to inhabit. When Nemed died a plague fell upon the land and the remaining Nemedians were forced to pay homage to the Fomorians. And being compelled to hand over two-thirds of their children born that year, two-thirds of their corn, wine and milk. Once again mourning for their children during Samhain .

    The Fomorians were eventually defeated, on what is seen as the second major festival of the year, Bealtaine. But that's a different story.

    You can read more on the article about the History of Samhain and the Evolution of Halloween.

    The Purpose of Samhain
    Even from the earliest of Celtic mythologies, Samhain is seen as the night when the dead come through the veil of the Otherworld and visit their living relatives and friends and join in ritual celebrations. This makes Samhain one of the most perfect times to communicate with spirits. During the early days of Celtic paganism, candles and food were left out for these traveling spirits, to help guide them along their journey. This is often seen as the origin of the jack-o-lantern and practice of trick-or-treat.

    Because Samhain has always coincided with the harvest season, the holiday has also become a celebration of abundance and honoring the God/Goddess for a bountiful crop. Which also marks the renewal of the Celtic year and the onset of winter.

    Samhain Celebration
    There are many ways to give honor during this 3rd and final harvest festival. Honoring the Great Spirits for their help during the growing seasons and giving thanks for a plentiful harvest.

    Setting a special plate for your spirit guests is also a nice way of welcoming them back into your home. But don't forget honoring them with a little symbolic gesture as well. What better way than carving a special pumpkin for your front porch or entryway.

    Preparing and baking corn bread for instance is one way to give honor for the harvest. Like Mabon, this is a day for thanksgiving of the harvest. Celebrating that harvest with a home cooked meal is a nice way to recognize that gift of plenty.

    The evening might begin with a quiet meditation for the purpose of contacting your loved ones in spirit. Or simply welcome your relatives into your home and talk with them about your year, your accomplishments and so on.You can light a candle in the name of each of your friends and relatives who have passed into spirit. Ask the Great Spirits to protect them and watch over them as they move onward with their souls journey.

    During the evening hours you can also continue the festival with a formal holiday ritual. There are as many ways and suggestions for conducting such a ceremony as there are people on this planet. But if you need a detailed example you have two places on our network to look. For a simple Celtic Ritual or Ceremony Outline or I invite you to visit our Wiccan Star site and review the Samhain Sabbat Ritual.

    End your evening in private reflection. It is important for anyone practicing a spiritual life to reflect on his or her actions. Record your thoughts, your emotions and your experiences. This is the true value of your book of shadows. And there is no better time to take stock of yourself and your life than during a High Holy Day.

    Some additional ideas for a Samhain Celebration:

    * Bob for apples. There were many divination practices associated with Samhain, many of which dealt with marriage, health, and the weather. Ducking for apples was a marriage divination based on the belief that the first to bite into an apple would be the first to marry in the coming year. This is similar to the wedding tradition of the throwing of the bride's bouquet for women and her garter for men.
    * Apple peeling was another type of divination to determine how long one's life would be. The longer the unbroken peel, the longer the life of the one peeling the rind
    * Carve jack-o-lanterns to light the way for the spirits who walk during this night.
    * Finish any incomplete projects and pay off lingering bills (if possible) to close out the old year and begin the new year afresh.
    * Set aside some time for scrying or other form of divination. Or if you don't divine yourself, get a reading.
    * Leave food out for the birds and other wild animals.
    * Put pictures of ancestors who have passed on your altar or festival table. Light a special candle for them, to show them the way to return and celebrate with you.
    * Visit the graves of your ancestors or, if this isn't possible, the nearest cemetery. Be still there, and listen for the voices of those who have passed.
    * Leave offerings of food and drink for them, and for the animals.
    * Tell ancestral stories and tales around the fire, or at the dinner table.
    * Have a mask-making ceremony in which you create masks to represent your ancestry.
     
  4. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Loreena McKennett all souls night.
     
  5. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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  6. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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  7. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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  8. VikingBolt

    VikingBolt BoltTalker

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    Where did you find this info?
     
  9. VikingBolt

    VikingBolt BoltTalker

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    Gee, wouldn't an awful lot of people look alike then?
     
  10. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    Gee, Conc - I guess you aren't just another pretty face!! :icon_tease:

    Thanks for the history lesson. :tup:
     
  11. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    You kiddin??

    This is classic Conc post paddin!! :yes: :tup:

    :bow:
     
  12. Ride The Lightning

    Ride The Lightning Join the Dark Side, we have cookies.

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    Samhain was a death rock/horror punk band formed by singer Glenn Danzig in 1983. The group's membership evolved into Danzig by 1987.

    Danzig originally planned Samhain as a side project, but after his earlier group, The Misfits, messily dissolved, it became his full-time band. Samhain is the least-celebrated of Danzig's major musical outlets and catalogs a transitional period in his musical career, bridging the gap between the punk rock of the Misfits and the dark, heavy metal and blues-influenced sound of Danzig. Both Samhain and its successor Danzig use the same horned skull image originally drawn by artist Michael Golden for the cover of the 1984 comic book The Saga of Crystar #8, published by Marvel Comics).

    Danzig took the name of the band from Samhain, the ancient Celtic New Year, which influenced the evolution of the modern Halloween. The band's name is typically pronounced "sam-hane" (i.e. the syllables rhyme with "ham" and "pain", respectively), though when the word occurs in song lyrics, Danzig himself pronounces it "sa-wun", in conformity with the generally accepted pronunciation of the name of the eponymous ancient holiday. This is evident in the song "Samhain" itself, and in "November's Fire" and the Danzig song "Soul on Fire".

    Samhain's lyrics were much darker than those of the Misfits, with themes rooted in the occult and eventually the horrors of reality, as opposed to the sometimes cartoonish ghouls and ghosts of the Misfits. Samhain's musical style was a dark, gritty, and experimental combination of punk, gothic rock, and on the last album, heavy metal.

    Samhain released two full-length albums and one EP during their three year career as an active band. As a footnote, Danzig has said that he wrote the songs "Bloodfeast" and "Death Comes Ripping" with the intention of using them on the first Samhain album, but instead recorded them with the Misfits for the Earth A.D./Wolfs Blood album in order to round out that band's final series of recordings and release a full album.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    The interwebs... But I have followed celtic history for about 12 years now and have seen this many times.
     
  14. sdbound

    sdbound Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  15. VikingBolt

    VikingBolt BoltTalker

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    Speaking of Celtic, have you see/heard Celtic Thunder? I saw them on KPBS and bought the DVD, they're really good. They are to appear in San Diego later this month.
     
  16. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    I believe I have. Celtic Woman is all the craze right now, but they are sooo slow...
     
  17. VikingBolt

    VikingBolt BoltTalker

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    I have a friend who's seen them and thinks they are great.
     
  18. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    They have a great sound for sure. Loreena McKennitt is my fave right now.
     
  19. VikingBolt

    VikingBolt BoltTalker

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    Don't know her.

    Hey, this server didn't change back to standard time.
    Either that or we have all been transported to the future :lol:
     
  20. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    View the three videos above. She has a beautiful voice.

    Time is relative. :icon_rofl:
     
  21. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Really, it is!! :yes:

    Adding the vids was a great touch!! :tup: :bow:
     
  22. VikingBolt

    VikingBolt BoltTalker

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    I'll check them out later, as my alloted time here is running out.
    Um....which relative? :)
     
  23. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Usually Uncle...
     
  24. Buck Melanoma

    Buck Melanoma Guest

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    Speaking of relative .....

    Anyone know the definition of relative humidity? :icon_shrug:

    That's the perspiration that builds up in a WVA girl's navel when she's having sex with her brother.


    :icon_eek:
     
  25. Concudan

    Concudan Caffeinated Commando

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    Yer one sick puppy Buck...

    Wait... I need to get another look at you and your lovely wife! :icon_eek:
     
  26. BFISA

    BFISA Well-Known Member

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    Uh-oh!! :icon_eek:
     

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