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Udfa's who do you want

Discussion in 'Chargers Fan Forum' started by charger1993, Jul 23, 2011.

  1. charger1993

    charger1993 bad motherfucker

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    Mark Herzlich,Mlb Boston college
    deandre mcdaniel SS Clemson
    Ian Williams, DT Notre Dame
    DeAndre Brown WR
    Deunta Williams - S

    But i will be completely happy if we only get

    Mark herzlich
    Ian williams
    Deandre brown and or deunta williams
     
  2. RipTheJacker

    RipTheJacker Well-Known Member

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    Anyone who doesnt think he would be an instant upgrade over hester is insane
     
  3. Blue Bolt

    Blue Bolt Persona Non Grata

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    Hester looked pretty good in college too........ how will he does as a rookie, against pros?
     
  4. RipTheJacker

    RipTheJacker Well-Known Member

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    Well unlike Hester, Hynoski is a REAL Fullback and can actually block!
    He has has great size (6'0 260) and can catch just as well as Hester
     
  5. Blue Bolt

    Blue Bolt Persona Non Grata

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    I wonder what Frank Summers' position will be...... they have him listed as a RB, but he was a FB. Of course, so was Tolbert originally.
     
  6. charger1993

    charger1993 bad motherfucker

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    very solid player, only question is his footwork at the next level, but could be a solid pick.. keep em rolling
     
  7. Bergo23

    Bergo23 BoltTalker

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    I would think we would have a good shot at Herzlich, as he can see our depth chart and knows the history of opportunity given to UDFA's here.

    I don't know about specific players, but OLB and a good pass rush "shot in the dark" would be nice. I hope our kid from Troy pans out...but he STRUGGLED on special teams last year.
     
  8. Blue Bolt

    Blue Bolt Persona Non Grata

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    The best undrafted players — Offense
    By Doug Farrar


    Usually, the players who are not selected in the NFL draft are grabbed up by teams a few days after the draft ends and as plans for first minicamps begin. Of course, this year's class of undrafted players have faced several blocks on their way to the pros. Because of the restrictive lockout rules, NFL teams could not contact them, and many UDFAs were left to work out at their college campuses, waiting in purgatory for a shot at the NFL. Now that we're on the precipice of an end to the work stoppage, here are some of the best players on offense that could help NFL teams sooner than later — if they get the chance.

    Adam Froman, QB, Louisville
    An interesting prospect — Froman was virtually unrecruited coming out of a Flintstones offense in high school, went the junior college route, and fought his way up the ladder to the position of starting quarterback for Louisville in the 2009 season. Switching from pro-style to spread for the 2010 season, Froman showed his surprising speed as a runner before losing his last five college games to injury. Underexposed on tape, but has the potential to show a Kevin Kolb(notes) (but faster) upside.

    Pat Devlin, QB, Delaware
    First mistake would be mistaking Devlin for fellow Delaware alum Joe Flacco(notes); Devlin would struggle to make the throws Flacco could zing in his sleep. Playing in a spread offense that was friendly to his relatively weak arm and inability to make strong throws in tight windows, Devlin could succeed in an offense with route complexity and deeper throws requiring more touch than velocity.

    Derrick Locke, RB, Kentucky
    Locke looked very impressive at the Senior Bowl, hitting holes and cutting back with an ability that reminded me of Steve Slaton(notes). The willingness to stand out in the blocking drills was a bonus — more than just about any player there, Locke played as if he had something to prove. At 5-foot-8 and 188 pounds and with an extensive injury history, Locke will have to be used in a rotation.

    Mario Fannin, RB, Auburn
    And just as Locke is the smaller back prospect in a rotation, Fannin might be an ideal short-yardage/fullback option. An excellent blocker without much long speed, Fannin was known more for blocking, and blasting through for yards after contact. A player whose film is more impressive than his stats.

    Dane Sanzenbacher, WR, Ohio State
    Another Senior Bowl standout, Sanzenbacher may have slipped through the cracks due to the fact that while he is an ideal possession receiver, he doesn't show ideal burst off the line and isn't very explosive when he gets in space. But teams looking for a good role-player on underneath stuff could do worse. A very smart player.

    Terrance Toliver, WR, LSU
    Dinged for his sub-par productivity in a very limited passing offense, Toliver does provide an interesting combination of size and speed. He's a project player, though — he's had issues with drops and there are off-field concerns that teams will have to take into account. A tough player in traffic with big-play potential in the right scheme and locker room.

    Ricardo Lockette, WR, Fort Valley State
    Lockette got some late pre-draft buzz for one reason — the sub-4.3 40s he was running at 6-foot-2 and 211 pounds. That speed shows up on his game tape, as well — where he falls short at this point is in route complexity and catch consistency. But he has the potential to flash as a deep threat at the Jacoby Ford(notes) level; it's just a matter of finding the right offense.

    Andre Smith(notes), TE, Virginia Tech
    With all the big receivers masquerading as tight ends these days, here's a guy far more conversant in smashmouth blocking than explosive plays. At 6-foot-4 and 270 pounds, Smith has near-tackle size, and that's most likely where he fits at the next level — teams running a lot of two-TE sets in which one tight end is set up to block in six-man style fronts will be looking hard at Smith when they can.

    Schuylar Oordt, TE, Northern Iowa
    Oordt, on the other hand, is a big receiver with the tight end position. Getting off to a slow start at a smaller school didn't do much for his draft stock, but his game tape should have him at the top of any offensive coordinator's post-lockout list. Oordt stretches the field in a way that could predetermine defensive matchups, and how often opposing defenses take third linebackers off the field.

    Derek Hall, OT, Stanford
    Hall came to Stanford as a defensive lineman and made the switch to the offensive side before the 2010 season, starting all 13 games at right tackle as quarterback Andrew Luck rose to the top of the charts. Inexperience kept Hall undrafted, but he showed enough in that one season to be taken seriously as a developmental prospect who could enjoy longtime success in the NFL.

    David Mims, OT, Virginia Union
    Strength of competition kept Mims off draft boards; even a cursory look at his game tape reveals a huge man who easily abuses the non-NFL prospects he played against. But the potential is certainly there; he spent his pre-draft time getting coached up by Hall-of-Famer Anthony Munoz and dropping 20 pounds off his playing weight. Teams looking for a power blocker and willing to work with a player who basically didn't have any specific positional coaching in college will look Mims' way.

    Ray Dominguez, OG, Arkansas
    Dominguez started for three seasons at tackle for the Razorbacks; though he may project better at guard at the NFL level especially for teams like the Falcons, Titans and Seahawks looking for bigger guards who are still mobile enough to stay with more complex offensive schemes.

    Kris O'Dowd, C, USC
    At a position where undrafted players frequently rack up multiple Pro Bowls, O'Dowd may be one of the better sleepers of this overlooked class of players. Projected by many as a mid-round pick, O'Dowd comes to the NFL with experience in different pro-style offenses. Probably best as a zone-blocking center; his intelligence and experience will set the tone.
     
  9. Blue Bolt

    Blue Bolt Persona Non Grata

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    The best undrafted players — Defense
    By Doug Farrar


    Usually, the players who are not selected in the NFL draft are grabbed up by teams a few days after the draft ends and as plans for first minicamps begin. Of course, this year's class of undrafted players have faced several blocks on their way to the pros. Because of the restrictive lockout rules, NFL teams could not contact them, and many UDFAs were left to work out at their college campuses, waiting in purgatory for a shot at the NFL. Now that we're on the precipice of an end to the work stoppage, here are some of the best players on deffense that could help NFL teams sooner than later — if they get the chance.

    Ian Williams, DT, Notre Dame
    One reason players drop to the realms of the undrafted is that they're "tweeners"—their size and measurables put them betwixt and between certain positions, and this may have been Williams' problem. At 6-foot-1 and 319 pounds, he projects well as a two-gap nose in a 3-4 defense, but some teams may want longer tackles in more hybrid fronts. Williams is a total fireplug, though, and should be a bargain for any team looking for a true nose tackle.

    Martin Parker, DT, Richmond
    The first of many defensive linemen of draftable quality who simply got lost in a numbers game in perhaps the deepest defensive line class of all time, Parker was lightly recruited coming out of high school, rose up through the ranks, and showed that he belonged with the best at the East-West Shrine Game. NFL teams may have wanted to see more pure dominance against lesser competition, but Parker could be a good rotational 3-tech in a four-man front.

    Cedric Thornton, DT, Southern Arkansas
    One of the more underrated defenders in this class -- I had a fifth-round grade on Thornton, and I was very surprised to see him slip through the draft. He fits so many defenses; Thornton can work as a five-tech end or three-tech tackle, and he has the strength and athleticism to flash pass-rush ability that may put people in mind of the Jets' Muhammad Wilkerson(notes). He was 16th in the nation in tackles for loss in 2010, and he'll play that way for whoever's smart enough to take him in the NFL.

    Ugo Chinasa, DE, Oklahoma State
    At 6-foot-5 and 264 pounds, Chinasa is another one of those inter-position "tweeners", and it doesn't help that one of the dings on him is that he doesn't possess a high motor — generally speaking, you don't want that said about an end you're drafting. However, with a team that uses a lot of zone blitzes, his ability to transition into surprisingly good coverage might make him a good fit.

    Brandon Bair, DE, Oregon
    Bair got list in the numbers game in a couple different ways — his age (26; he spent two years on a Mormon mission) and 6-foot-6, 276 pounds (his measurements, which lead some to believe that he doesn't have the speed to play five-tech end, but is too long to play three-tech. Given a serious weight program, he might be able to bulk up to 290 for a team willing to think outside the box.

    Jeff Tarpinian, ILB, Iowa
    It was a weak year for inside linebackers of any stripe, and the guys who did get drafted went very low (Greg Jones in the sixth round? Are you freakin' kidding me?), but I thought Tarpinian might get more of a look after the Colts had success with former Iowa alum Pat Angerer(notes) in their defense. Like Angerer, Tarpinian shows surprising strength for his size (six-foot-2, 235 pounds). Either Tarpinian's injuries got in the way, or "Tarpinian" just isn't as cool a football name as "Angerer" (which it isn't).

    Adrian Moten, OLB, Maryland
    Moten was productive in college, but when projecting to the NFL, it's hard to find a place for a 6-foot-2, 228-pound linebacker who runs a 4.6 40. There are a few WILL linebackers of that size in the league (Keith Ellison(notes), Coy Wire(notes), and rookie Marcus Smith out of USC who was drafted in the seventh round by Seattle), but teams are probably looking for someone more sudden in the open field.

    Mark Herzlich, OLB, Boston College
    Once projected as a first-round pick (or, at the very least, an early second-day guy), Herzlich saw his life and career sidetracked severely by the bone cancer that eventually forced doctors to insert a rod in his left leg. Herzlich underwent treatment, is cancer-free, came back to play in the 2010 season, and looked pretty agile at the Senior Bowl. Herzlich is as determined as any player I've ever seen — we're talking about rare courage here — and if he stays healthy, he could be a good rotation nickel guy and the primary reason that nobody — and I mean NOBODY -- would ever be able to complain about "boo-boos" in his locker room.

    Ryan Jones, CB, Northwest Missouri State
    The first of two corners on our list who probably project best in the shot, Jones didn't get to go up against a lot of elite competition, but he has the base speed — both in short areas and long coverage — to do certain things at the NFL level, Better in man than zone, he needs to be coached up and let loose.

    Kendric Burney, CB, North Carolina
    Perhaps the most surprising stud at the Senior Bowl, Burney locked down on everyone he saw in Mobile, picking off three passes during one South Team practice and giving himself 10 push-ups for barely missing another. The game tape isn't quite as impressive, but if you're looking for a good slot defender who will get beaten once in a while but will generally annoy the heck out of the guys he covers, Burney's worth a look.

    Deunta Williams, FS, North Carolina
    It's hard to assess just why Williams fell out of the draft entirely — there were enough mid-round grades on him, and he started each of the 46 games he played for the Tar Heels. How much the four games he was suspended for his role in the UNC agent scandal factors in is unknown. The other problem was the broken leg he suffered in December — he missed the postseason games and workouts because of it, but he'll get a shot somewhere as a player who can play an interchangeable safety role.

    DeAndre McDaniel, SS, Clemson
    McDaniel overcame a very rough childhood to establish himself as one of the faces of a great Clemson defense. A Thorpe Award finalist in 2009 after an eight-interception season, he followed that up with a senior campaign in which he led the team in tackles. Has grown into a team leader and film junkie, and could project very well into a defense with very distinct free and strong safety designations — he was probably devalued because he's not elite in space and doesn't cover a lot of ground.
     
  10. Joy Division

    Joy Division Slightly-known Member

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    Jeff Maehl WR-Oregon

    Mostly for the cool nicknames....The Maehlman...AirMaehl...plus, the dude is relentless. Remind you of anyone?

     
  11. BoltsFanUK

    BoltsFanUK Well-Known Member

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    especially if we lose either Floyd or Jackson- he'd be a great pick up for this offense especially with PR throwing him the football
     
  12. The LBC

    The LBC I'm a Real Prick

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    Andre Smith is at the top of my list because it softens the blow of losing McMichael if we do and then don't sign an adequate replacement. Wilson and Sperry are passable - if still pretty average - receivers, but both are looking up at being average blockers. Smith is an upgrade in that aspect with a fair amount of upside. Not saying he'll ever be another Gates, but there's no reason he couldn't become another McMichael or Desmond Clark type (reliable #2).

    Tarpinian should be looked at. As a UDFA and a camp body his past injury history is kind of a null factor since he'll be signed uber-cheap and have to earn his way onto the team. Iowa has a great LB pedigree under Kirk Ferentz (Greenway, Angerer, etc.) and a tradition of putting out tough, hard-nosed, take-no-prisoners defenders.

    As an Oregon fan, I think Bair may be a man without a natural position in this league. His timed speed and lack of bulk will probably have some team trying to fit him in at 3-4 OLB, but ultimately he's probably at best a career-backup 4-3 LDE and even then he has to improve against the run. As a 3-4 OLB, he's another Shawn Crable.

    Wouldn't mind us taking a look at Minnesota's Adam Weber either (don't think he was drafted). He's not big, his arm isn't the rocket variety (still strong enough to make pro throws), and he's more of a Brees-type (undersized, but has crafty and has the potential to really hone his accuracy and touch to make it the reason why he succeeds). He's also a guy with an approach to football much like Rivers' so he's someone I could easily see Rivers both getting along with and being open to mentoring.

    Will post more and dig up my notes from back just following the draft once I get back from an errand.
     
  13. The LBC

    The LBC I'm a Real Prick

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    To add on:

    If Smith is snatched up quickly, which I expect him to be (there's always a premium put on blocking TE's in UDFA), Michigan State's Charlie Gantt is another option that's probably a little more natural of a receiver and not quite the physically beast that Smith is, but he's also a bit more technically polished and just a blue-collar type that could go far with us.

    I'm always really iffy on extremely small school and D2 WR's because the success cases are honestly pretty rare. Yes, people will point to Southeast Missouri State and Jerry Rice, but there are a lot of other guys that came out of FCS and never managed to establish themselves in the NFL. There's something to be said for the quality of coaching you get at the FBS level and the top conferences. I stand by my original statement, if Keith Smith's (formerly of Purdue) knee checks out, sign him, and sit back and watch him earn a roster spot (beyond the fact that we're likely shedding 2-3 WR's in free agency if you consider Floyd, Naanee, and Washington all casualties, I can see a healthy Smith pushing guys like Goodman and Jeremy Williams for their spots on the DC). He also has a skill set that pairs extremely well with Vincent Brown moving forward (and looking, if both develop in the best ways possible to their potential, 5+ years down the line).

    I also stand by my hope that (especially with the 90-man camp roster allowance) we get former Sooner Adrian Taylor signed and if nothing us PUP him for the year. This is this year's Arthur Jones (going into his junior year he was considered a fringe-1st round talent, then he started suffering injuries). Give him the opportunity to heal completely and to fully rehab his injuries, and look for him to make most of his initial impact in his 3rd year (which coincidentally would coincide with when Garay's contract runs up and we should have a good idea of what guys like Martin and Baby Zilla are going to amount to as pros).

    Guys I'll pull for if we sign, but if it were up to me I just really don't want:
    Tori Gurley and DeAndre Brown - We have enough of a problem with guys who let their egos get bigger than the team here. I'm not saying we have to only bring in choirboys, but we need to bring in guys that Norv and Co. are actually able to corral in and get to toe the line. Top of the fact that Brown knows a grand total of 2 routes and has some of the worst run-blocking technique I've ever seen from a receiver his size.

    DeAndre McDaniel - I pride myself in my ability to breakdown DB's (having played the position myself; and having done a pretty darn good job identifying boom and bust candidates from previous draft classes thus far, even before they were picked). McDaniel is more another in the ilk of Pat Watkins or Aaron Rouse than anything else. His technique (particularly his tackling) is poor, he's not all that great in space, and his instincts are very average (which is really detrimental for a safety). I'd sooner give the shot at the roster to Deunta Williams who fits what we ask our safeties to do far better than McDaniel does.
     
  14. Joy Division

    Joy Division Slightly-known Member

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    Mississippi Valley State?

    Unless you do mean someone from Southeast Missouri that I'm not aware of...
     
  15. The LBC

    The LBC I'm a Real Prick

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    No, you're right. MVSU... the devils or something. I busted out some old school Madden (like 2004 or 2005, whichever one they actually had the Tony Bruno radio bits worked into... and someone answered the trivia question on there wrong with Southeast Miss State... so it always kidn of stuck in my mind.
     
  16. RipTheJacker

    RipTheJacker Well-Known Member

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    He would have nothing to do with replacing floyd or jackson, he would be practice squad at best. If those guys leave, im sure they would expect Vincent brown or Tutu to fill in, not an UDFA rookie with no camp. Not saying he isnt good, but WR/CB are the 2 hardest positions to transition to the NFL (besides obviously QB), and without camp/OTA and not even getting a playbook til late july, i dont expect any undrafted WR to make a team this year.
     
  17. The LBC

    The LBC I'm a Real Prick

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    Acee's pretty confident that M80 is as good as gone - we won't pay him as much as some other team will offer. Barring acquisitions of other WR's with actual NFL experience or someone like Goodman or Williams (or, God forbid, BusteD!) having some monumental breakout in the preseason, we're likely to see a projected DC of Jackson-Tutu-Crayton (in the slot and probably rotating there with Brown if he catches on quick and with Tutu)-Brown. Considering the #1 receiver on this offense (not WR, but pure receiver) is Gates, that's nothing to turn your nose up at. By virtue of having Gates and VJ on the field at the same time should free up guys like Crayton (who is tricky, a good route-runner, and smart enough to find holes in zones).
     

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