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We need Heineken

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by HollywoodLeo, Aug 6, 2007.

  1. turbo_turtle

    turbo_turtle In Disguise

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  2. BOLTS4LIFE

    BOLTS4LIFE Banned Banned

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    I know that Carrie wants Sauza 'Green Lable' Tequila!!!:tup:
     
  3. Kev

    Kev BoltTalker

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    :)

    Heineken? Did you say HEINEKEN????

    [​IMG]
     
  4. BOLTS4LIFE

    BOLTS4LIFE Banned Banned

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    I've acquired a new taste for Pabst Blue Ribbon.

    I don't know if my taste buds have changed or they changed the recipe but that was the first beer I ever had and i remember it being nasty.
    About 26 years later, I decided to try it again since it's becoming popular and it was quite tasty!!
     
  5. Kev

    Kev BoltTalker

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    :)

    I don't understand why some people are so down on some beers that they won't ever drink them. To me you really have to try hard to mess up beer. If someone's offering when I'm at their place, I'll drink just about anything.

    I do indeed love me some beer. ;)
     
  6. turbo_turtle

    turbo_turtle In Disguise

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    They changed the recipe because like you I thought it tasting nasty.

    It now tastes very good.
     
  7. BOLTS4LIFE

    BOLTS4LIFE Banned Banned

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    Sure does. Especially from the tap!!!

    BTW... "LIGHTS OUT ALE" will be served at the Ponies game!!! :bolt:
     
  8. BOLTS4LIFE

    BOLTS4LIFE Banned Banned

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    Ever have "Black Label?"
    It taste horrible and all it does is gives you gas.

    But the worst beer I ever had is "Barnegat Lighthouse Beer."
    You take a sip and you seriously want to spit it out!!!
     
  9. turbo_turtle

    turbo_turtle In Disguise

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    Excellent :tup:

    My stomache will thank you very much. :icon_toast:

    Maybe my drunkeness will as well. :icon_party:
     
  10. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    Heiny....hmmmmm...yeah.. :icon_toast:
     
  11. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    The History of Heineken

    The Heineken family entered the beer business in 1864, when Gerard Adriaan Heineken bought a brewery in the heart of Amsterdam. Over the past 140 years, three generations of the Heineken family have built and expanded the brand and the company in Europe and around the world. It is thanks to the leadership of Gerard, Henry and Alfred Heineken that Heineken is one of the world’s leading brewing groups. Today Charlene de Carvalho-Heineken is delegate member of the Board of directors of Heineken Holding N.V.
    1864 22-year-old businessman Gerard Adriaan Heineken purchases the "The Haystack" brewery, the largest in the region. He demands and receives full control of shares, realising that sweeping and rapid changes are needed.
    1868 To meet increasing consumer demand, a new brewery is built in Amsterdam at the Buitensingel.
    1869 Gerard Heineken decides to switch from traditional top fermentation to the Bavarian method of bottom fermentation, a totally different technique that produces a clearer, purer beer, which keeps longer. The new beer is known for its quality and is called 'Gentleman's Beer' as opposed to 'Workman's Ale'.
    A decade of fierce competition begins, with several new breweries competing for the high-quality beer market. Heineken must again start making cheaper workman's beers and gets into the business of cafes, hotels, and beer houses to secure purchasers. Brewers take on the role of banks, providing credit and extravagant extra benefits to win over clients.
    1870 Due to the Franco-Prussian war, imports of Bavarian beer dry up, causing Heineken's sales to skyrocket.
    1873 Heineken's Bierbrouwerij Maatschappij N.V. (Heineken Breweries or HBM) is incorporated. Gerard Heineken is appointed President and the name 'Haystack' is replaced by Heineken. The brewery stops producing 'workman's beer'.
    1874 After merging the previous year with Oranjeboom breweries, a state-of-the-art brewery is built in Rotterdam. With a work-floor of 3000 square metres, it is one of the most expensive and innovative facilities of its day.
    1875 Heineken beer wins a gold medal at the International Exposition in Paris and regular shipments to the French capital begin. Among others, the Folies Bergere signs up to receive an annual 2000 hectolitres.
    Heineken continues to expand, struggling between concessions to the market and its belief in

    the high quality, and price, standards that put it on the map in the first place. Continuing with Gerard Heineken's philosophy that, "A good product is recommended by its use alone," the company refuses to deploy advertising seriously, seeing it as useless and rather low-class. Technical breakthroughs ultimately provide a critical edge.
    1880 Heineken sales top 64,000 hectolitres. The company is now the biggest exporter to France, and in particular Paris, which is fast becoming 'the capital of the nineteenth-century'.
    1881 Cooling systems are installed in the brewery in Amsterdam, terminating dependence on natural ice. In 1883, cooling systems are installed in the brewery in Rotterdam.
    1886 Doctor Elion, a student of Louis Pasteur, develops the A-yeast strain, still used today to give Heineken its characteristic flavour.
    1889 The innovations begin to pay off: the brewery is awarded the gold medal of honour at the World Exhibition in Paris, where Heineken beer is supplied to the Eiffel tower restaurant. This award crowns the quality-focused policies of Gerard Heineken and director Wilhelm Feltmann.
    It is an age of great innovation, and one improvement quickly follows another. The innovations are not only technical: industrial buildings like breweries are already being recognised as important works of architecture in their own right. The labour movement also begins to make its presence felt on the work floor.
    1890 Electric lighting is installed at the Amsterdam brewery.
    1893 Gerard Adriaan Heineken dies. Under the direction of Gerard Heineken and Wilhelm Feltmann, HBM has grown in its first twenty years from a small company to a large-scale industry. The groundwork has been laid for future expansion.
    1894 The end of an epoch: despite master brewer Feltmann's hopes for his own son to take the position, J.D.A. Petersen becomes the new director. He later marries Gerard's widow Mary Tindal, becoming stepfather of the eight-year-old Henry Pierre Heineken.
    1899 The barrel-makers submit a request for a wage increase, marking the beginning of a long process of workers' rights negotiations.
    As the business consolidates its hold on markets, employers come under increasing pressure from workers demanding explicit agreements and better treatment. Petersen resists pressure from old-style managers and strives for dialogue, which ultimately results in the first collective labour agreements.
    8 / 9
    1900 Heineken beer is honoured with a special Jury Prize in Paris. Sales of beer brewed under Heineken's auspices increase to 200,000 hectolitres.
    1901 The year sees the first major strike and call for a boycott by workers. Negotiations result in a rise in the minimum wage and pay for overtime.
    1904 A day of rest on Sunday is introduced.
    1909 The first collective bargaining agreements are established. In Rotterdam, this means a 54-hour week and four days off a year. As a compromise, workers no longer receive four free litres of beer a week.
    Henry Heineken comes of age and takes over the helm. He and his team represent a new generation of leaders. With both academic credentials and practical experience, they pioneer a new management style: socially aware and outward looking.
    1912 Competition between well-established major breweries again increases to fever pitch. Heineken responds by reducing the price slightly and concentrating on on-premises sales.
    1914 Henry Heineken obtains a seat on the Executive Board. Heineken welcomes its first woman employee, a telephone operator. Sales of beer brewed under the supervision of Heineken have now climbed to 300,000 hectolitres: 30% more than the beginning of the century
    The company begins efforts to expand to Asia. In the United States, alcohol is banned and will remain so throughout the decade. Modern communication and advertising come into its own as Heineken moves into foreign markets. An international springboard is created for future global expansion.
     
  12. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    1923 Heineken is one of the first Dutch companies to establish a non-contributory pension fund for employees.
    1927 H.R.H. Prince Hendrik grants HBM the rights to His Coat of Arms. H.R.H. Queen Wilhelmina grants HBM the rights to the Royal Coat of Arms with the title of Royal Purveyor.
    1928 An aircraft writes a Heineken ad in the sky above the Olympic Games in Amsterdam: one of the first deeds of Peter Feith, new head of exports. Under his leadership, Heineken will take its first steps towards becoming a truly international company.
    1929 Heineken participates for the first time in the construction of a brewery in a tropical region. Building starts in Surabaya in the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia).
    The decade of the first great global economic depression sees significant international expansion and technical achievements for the company. Heineken moves decisively into the US and Asian markets. It also further expands its social policy: during the crisis, no personnel are fired. Rather, an early retirement scheme is applied for staff age 58 and over.
    1931 Heineken and Fraser & Neave in Singapore start Malayan Breweries Limited (MBL), now Asia Pacific Breweries, operating in China, South-East Asia and New Zealand.
    1932 Heineken opens a pilot brewery in Rotterdam, enabling the laboratory to test the results of its own activities. This is almost unique and critically important for trying out new modes of operation and instruction, especially for staff from breweries abroad.
    1933 The M.S. Statendam transports the first Heineken beer consignment to the United States after Prohibition is lifted. This marks the beginning of Heineken's rising popularity in the United States.
    1937 The Heineken Foundation for Personnel is established to provide extra support to employees in the years of the Great Depression.
    1939 Heineken is listed on the stock market. The Foundation of the Central Brewery Organisation is established, initiated by Heineken. Its aim is to ensure a unified response by brewers during the impending war. The Organisation ultimately prevented disbanding of breweries and requisitioning of workers.
    World War II provokes a continuous decline in beer quality and production as breweries in the Netherlands are deprived of raw materials. As the war ends, the first signs of spectacular international expansion set in. Henry's successor, Alfred 'Freddy' Heineken, enters the business as a sales promoter in the US, where he will develop the marketing expertise to later internationalise the company in the 1950s and 60s.
    1940 Henry Heineken resigns from the Executive Board and is appointed Delegate Member of the Supervisory Council (until 1951).
    1942 Alfred Henry Heineken, grandson of the founder Gerard Adriaan Heineken and son of Henry Heineken, officially begins his career with the company.
    1948 Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands grants the rights to his Coat of Arms to HBM.
    4 / 9
    1949 The Netherlands transfers sovereignty to the new Indonesian government. The Surabaya brewery becomes 'Heineken's Indonesian Brewery Company'.
    On the international markets, the reputation of the Heineken brand name gains strength. In 1954, Alfred Heineken acquires the majority of shares in the company and begins a radical modernisation. With an ardent belief in brand and marketing, he sets about proving his conviction that 'beer can travel': it's the beginning of a truly effective global marketing policy.
    1953 The brewery "De Sleutel" (The Key) in Dordrecht is taken over by Heineken. "De Sleutel", established in 1433, is the oldest industrial enterprise in the Netherlands. The brewery continues as a producer of dark beers until its closure in 1969.
    1954 The rapidly growing popularity of beer dramatically influences Heineken's domestic and export sales volumes. The Board decides to build a new brewery in 's Hertogenbosch.
    1957 The Indonesian Government appropriates the Heineken brewery at Surabaya from 1957 until 1967. In 1967 Heineken resumes operations of the brewery, which ultimately takes the name Multi Bintang Indonesia.
    1959 In order to meet the increasing demand for Heineken beer, the company embarks on a substantial extension of the brewery in 's Hertogenbosch.
    Aba, Boma, Kumasi, Kisangani, Moundou... The motto during the 1950s and 60s is: Build and Brew. By 1960, Heineken is the market leader in Africa, and is making giant strides elsewhere. Refinement of the company's visual design and brand identity continue; notable progress includes a clear international logo. 1961 The Kumasi Brewery in Ghana opens. Heineken owns or has an interest in 4 breweries in the Netherlands and 24 abroad, including properties in Egypt, Italy, Venezuela, Angola and the Belgian Congo (today Zaire).
    1963 The Heineken Foundation is established to give a bi-annual award to outstanding scientists in the field of biochemistry, including microbiology and the germinating physiology of seeds.
    1964 A new international logo is introduced, for labels, coasters and other visual designs. Among these are the famous 'Heineken lips', the two red semi-circles enclosing the black stripe and name on the coaster. The style has remained the international icon by which the brand is still known.
    1967 The first fully automated filling line for draught beer is installed in the brewery in Rotterdam.
    Simultaneously, a new keg type with a built-in extractor tube, the Sankey keg, that fits the new filling line, is put into use. It will be introduced gradually in the whole country. Heineken also embarks upon computerised data processing.
    1968 Heineken takes over Amstel Brouwerij N.V. as well as soft drinks producer Vrumona N.V. in Bunnik (the Netherlands), thus securing its share in the Netherlands internal market, which is heavily under threat from foreign competitors. The first Heineken advertisements appear on TV.
    Increasingly at home in the world, Heineken is still a foreign guest in Europe. While it has a top position as an import in the premium segment of the market, it is not dominant in the European market as a whole. Alfred Heineken develops a strategy to change that and begins producing beer within European countries. 1971 Alfred Heineken is appointed Chairman of the Executive Board. A glance at Heineken abroad reveals an expanding roster of interests: Malayan Breweries in Singapore; Perusahaan Bir Indonesia; bottle manufacturers Boukin in Zaire; Bralima, Zaire; Bralirwa, Ruanda; Brarudi, Burundi; Brasserie de Brazzaville in the People's Republic of Congo; Kumasi Brewery in Ghana; Nigerian Breweries; Ibecor in Brussels; Antilliaanse Brouwerij, Curaçao; Brasserie Lorraine, Martinique; Surinaamse Brouwerij in Paramaribo; Athenian Brewery in Athens; and Albert Maltings in Belgium.
    1972 Heineken acquires a majority participating interest in the share capital of Holding Company l'Espérance, which was the French ALBRA group, then the third largest brewing group in France.
    1973 On the occasion of the hundredth anniversary of the company, the Executive Board donates NLG 100,000 to three social-medical organisations located in cities in the Netherlands that have Heineken breweries.
    1979 Official inauguration by Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands of the distillery (with grain-alcohol roasting house) in Zoetermeer. Heineken increases its participation in the Dreher Group (Italy) from 90% to nearly 100%. When Heineken's interest in the French brewing group ALBRA increases to 100%., ALBRA is renamed Heineken France S.A.
    Heineken achieves broad market leadership in Europe through many acquisitions, and fine-tunes its communication and products to appeal to consumers in each local culture. These vary hugely: the English are used to weak dark ales; the Italians still have mainly a wine culture; the three Swiss language regions each have their own different expectations. Heineken becomes a fixture in traditional bars from Dublin to Geneva.
    1980 A first installation based on reversed osmosis (hyper filtration) considerably improves water processing in Europe.
     
  13. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    6 / 9
    1982 The Amstel brewery in Amsterdam closes down. Production is transferred to the Heineken brewery in Zoeterwoude. Heineken takes over Brouwerij de Ridder B.V. in Maastricht (the Netherlands). Heineken doubles its participation in a number of companies in Central Africa by acquiring shares already issued. 1983 The company enters into brewing cooperation in Brazil with Coca-Cola bottlers, producing Kaiser beer. Today Cervejaria Kaiser is the third brewing group of Brazil. Kirin Brewery Company Ltd. starts to brew Heineken under license in Japan.
    1988 This year is marked by a joint venture via Asia Pacific Breweries with third parties in the Mila Brewery in Shanghai (China) and the introduction of Buckler alcohol-free beer in France, Spain, the Netherlands and Ireland.
    1989 Alfred 'Freddy' Heineken retires from the Board, having reached the age limit laid down in the company's Articles of Association. He is appointed Chairman and Delegated Member of the Supervisory Council.
    Heineken has become the second largest brewer in the world with the world's most international brand, selling in over 170 countries. The core values upon which it was built - consistent top quality, engaging people through their own culture, and also its social awareness - have allowed the company to renew itself over and again.
    1991 Heineken takes over Van Munching & Co., its sole importer in the United States. This ends the remarkable lifetime contracts awarded Leo van Munching and his son in 1960 in recognition of their achievement as the first and only US importers of Heineken. Leo sr. was initially appointed in 1945. Through his work, Heineken became a best-loved import in the US, an achievement that remains as unique as his contract.
    1992 Operations in the former Eastern Bloc and other communist countries gather steam. Heineken increases its interest in Komáromi Sörgyár RT in Hungary to 55.3%.
    1994 Heineken acquires a 24.9% participating interest in the Polish brewery, Zywiec S.A. Zywiec has a leading position in the premium segment of the Polish beer market, three breweries with a total production capacity of 1.1 million hectolitres, and a share of 7% of the Polish beer market. An agreement is signed with Hainan Brewery Co. Ltd. (HBCL) for the construction of a brewery on Hainan Island in China.
    1998 The Heineken University is opened. This is a training infrastructure designed for the optimal use and expansion of know-how and experience within the company.
    7 / 9
    1999 In the Netherlands, the Heineken brand is voted 'Brand of the Century' and Alfred Henry Heineken is proclaimed 'Advertiser of the century'.
    2000 Heineken receives the King William I Prize for Dutch Entrepreneurship. This prestigious prize is awarded once every two years to a large Dutch company that has attracted attention due to impressive entrepreneurial activities and important contributions to the economy, employment, prosperity and the entrepreneurial reputation of the Netherlands.
    Heineken expands its operations in China, Nigeria, Sweden, Belgium, Slovakia and Spain.
    2001
    The festive opening of the Heineken Experience in the former brewery on the Stadhouderskade in Amsterdam takes place. To honour this event, Heineken N.V. publishes the book, The Magic of Heineken.
    2002 The Heineken Company respectfully marks the death of its leader Alfred ‘Freddy’ Heineken at the beginning of the year. As a true entrepreneur, Freddy Heineken is credited with making Heineken into the truly international company it is today.
    2003 The acquisition of Brau-Beteiligungs A.G. (BBAG) in Austria, the largest acquisition in the history of Heineken, significantly extends the lead of Heineken in Europe, where Heineken was already the largest brewer. Through this acquisition, Heineken is now also market leader in Austria, Romania, and Hungary and consolidates leading positions and brand portfolios in Poland and the Czech Republic.
    2004 The business is further shaped through acquisitions and joint ventures, ensuring the creation of value. In Russia and China the position of Heineken is strengthened through acquisitions and in the USA an agreement is concluded with FEMSA in Mexico to distribute their strongly growing brands. In South Africa, Brandhouse is launched, a joint venture with Diageo and Namibia Breweries. In Australia Heineken enters in to a joint venture with Lion Nathan.
    The first comprehensive sustainability award is published for the period 2002-2003, presenting a thorough and broad overview of activities worldwide. In recognition of the continuous focus on corporate sustainability, Heineken is awarded the prestigious Dutch ACC Award for best sustainability report.
    2005 Heineken acquires a number of breweries in Germany and Russia.
    Also in 2005, Heineken introduces a new light Heineken beer to the US market. This new beer, Heineken Premium Light Lager, is brewed in the same high quality tradition as the original Heineken, but is lighter in taste and has fewer calories and carbohydrates. The US light market represents half of the total US beer market and is still growing.
    8 / 9
    Heineken also introduces its portable draught beer system, the Heineken DraughtKeg. DraughtKeg allows consumers to experience a premium quality draught beer at virtually any drinking occasion. Heineken launched this innovation in France and in the USA in May 2005, followed by the introduction in the Netherlands.
    The portable DraughtKeg has been developed for consumers who like to share and enjoy a quality draught beer in or outdoors and is relevant to the various beer cultures worldwide.
    In 2005 the Executive Committee is introduced. The two members of the Executive Board, the five Regional Presidents and five Group Directors together form the Executive Committee, which supports the development of policies and ensures the alignment and implementation of key priorities and strategies across the organisation. 9 / 95 / 9
     
  14. Thumper

    Thumper WHS

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    I agree. I've tried all the different beers out there and sometimes might want one of the "better" beers. I've also went though a whole micro brew stage where I tasted hundreds, if not thousands of types of micro brews.

    Where I live now, micro brews are big thing. If someone's offering me a beer, I'll take anything except a Coors product and that's more of a political statement than anything. My beer of choice right now is PBR. It's good and it's cheap.
     
  15. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heineken_Cup
    Heineken Cup
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Jump to: navigation, search
    Heineken Cup
    2007-08 Heineken Cup

    Sport Rugby union
    Founded 1995
    No. of teams 24
    Country England
    France
    Ireland
    Italy
    Scotland
    Wales
    Most recent champion(s) London Wasps
    The Heineken Cup sponsored by Heineken (known as the H Cup in France due to alcohol advertising laws) is an annual rugby union competition involving leading club, regional and provincial teams from England, France, Ireland, Italy, Scotland and Wales. The competition is organised by the European Rugby Cup, who are also responsible for the secondary championship, the European Challenge Cup. It is one of the most prestigious trophies in the sport. The tournament was launched in the European summer of 1995 on the initiative of the then Five Nations committee to provide a new level of professional cross-border competition.

    Each European nation has a different qualifying system, though in total, 24 teams contest the pool stages in six pools of four. According to performances, the number of clubs from each nation changes. The tournament is held from October to May, with various stages held in between respective club competitions. The current champions are London Wasps, who beat Leicester Tigers in the final at Twickenham. French club Toulouse have been the most successful team, winning the championship three times.

    Contents [hide]
    1 Format
    1.1 Qualification
    1.2 Competition
    2 Results
    3 History
    3.1 1995 - 1998
    3.2 1999 - 2004
    3.3 2005 - present
    4 Records and statistics
    4.1 By nation
    4.2 By club
    5 See also
    6 References
    7 External links

    Diagram showing how qualification is obtained for Heineken Cup and European Challenge Cup.The Heineken Cup is open to clubs in the Celtic League, Guinness Premiership, Super 10 and the Top 14. Places in the Heineken Cup are allocated to the six competing nations on the following basis; France (top six in Top 14); England (top five in the Guinness Premiership, plus winner of Anglo-Welsh Cup if English); Ireland (top three Irish sides in the Celtic League); Wales (top three Welsh sides in the Celtic League); Scotland (top two Scottish sides in the Celtic League) and Italy (two finalists in the Super 10).[1]

    The winners of the Heineken Cup and the European Challenge Cup both qualify for the next year's Heineken Cup, and are awarded places from their country's allocation above. The remaining two places in the 24 team tournament are allocated as follows: one team comes from France, England or Italy; this place is allocated to the country whose team progressed further in the previous season's Heineken Cup.[1] For example, London Wasps won the 2006-07 competition, so there will be seven English teams in the 2007-08 competition.

    The other team is the winner of a playoff between the best-placed team in the Celtic League who has not already qualified, and the best-placed semifinalist in the Italian Super 10.[1] The playoff is a single match, which takes place alternately in Italy or the home of the Celtic League side. Each nation sets its own criteria for qualification for the Heineken Cup, but must give places to the Cup winners and the winners of the European Challenge Cup. Clubs that do not qualify for the Heineken Cup can enter the European Challenge Cup. From 2005 one team from each nation will be seeded.


    [edit] Competition

    The 2005-06 final at Millennium Stadium in Cardiff between Munster and Biarritz.Six pools of four teams play both home and away games. Four points are awarded for a win and two points for a draw. A bonus point is awarded for a loss by seven points or fewer, or for scoring four tries or more. The six Pool winners (ranked 1-6 by number of points scored) and two best placed runners-up (ranked seven and eight) qualify for the quarter-finals. Teams ranked one to four have home advantage. The quarter-finals are: team one v team eight; team two v team seven; team three v team six; team four v team five.

    The quarter-finals are played at the home stadiums of the higher-seeded clubs, or sometimes at a larger stadium in or near the host team's city. The semi-finals, on the other hand, are always played at nominally neutral venues. Each of the two semi-final venues are in the country of the first team out of the hat when the draw is made. For example, in 2004, Munster v Wasps was played at Lansdowne Road in Dublin, while Toulouse v Biarritz was played in Bordeaux.[2]

    However, the neutrality requirement is satisfied simply by the designated home team playing outside of its normal stadium. Both 2005 semifinals were held in the host's home city; Leicester Tigers v Toulouse was held at Walkers Stadium in Leicester, not far from Leicester's normal home of Welford Road,[3] while Stade Français v Biarritz was played at Parc des Princes in Paris, across the street from Stade's normal home field. The semifinal venue must also meet the following additional criteria; tt must have a capacity of at least 20,000[4] and it must be in the same country as the designated home team.

    However, the European Rugby Cup, which organises the competition, may allow exceptions, such as with Biarritz, located in a city less than 20km from the Spanish border, being allowed to host their 2006 semi-final across the border at Estadio Anoeta in Donostia-San Sebastián (which is the nearest stadium to Biarritz with a suitable capacity).[5] A similar exception was made for Bourgoin when they hosted Munster in Switzerland at Stade de Genève, Geneva. The final is held at a predetermined site.[6]


    [edit] Results
    Main article: Heineken Cup finals
    Season Winner Score Runner-up Venue
    2007/08
    Details TBC - TBC Millennium Stadium,
    Cardiff
    2006/07
    Details London Wasps 25 - 9 Leicester Tigers Twickenham,
    London
    2005-06
    Details Munster 23 - 19 Biarritz Millennium Stadium,
    Cardiff
    2004-05
    Details Toulouse 18 - 12 Stade Français Murrayfield,
    Edinburgh
    2003-04
    Details London Wasps 27 - 20 Toulouse Twickenham,
    London
    2002-03
    Details Toulouse 22 - 17 Perpignan Lansdowne Road,
    Dublin
    2001-02
    Details Leicester Tigers 15 - 9 Munster Millennium Stadium,
    Cardiff
    2000-01
    Details Leicester Tigers 34 - 30 Stade Français Parc des Princes,
    Paris
    1999-00
    Details Northampton Saints 9 - 8 Munster Twickenham,
    London
    1998-99
    Details Ulster 21 - 6 Colomiers Lansdowne Road,
    Dublin
    1997-98
    Details Bath 19 - 18 Brive Stade Lescure,
    Bordeaux
    1996-97
    Details Brive 28 - 9 Leicester Tigers Cardiff Arms Park,
    Cardiff
    1995-96
    Details Toulouse 21 - 18
    a.e.t. Cardiff Cardiff Arms Park,
    Cardiff


    [edit] History

    [edit] 1995 - 1998
    The Heineken Cup was launched in the summer of 1995 on the initiative of the then Five Nations Committee to provide a new level of professional cross border competition.[7] Twelve sides representing Ireland, Wales, Italy, Romania and France competed in four pools of three with the group winners going directly into the semi-finals.[8] English and Scottish teams did not take part in the inaugural competition.[9] From an inauspicious beginning in Romania, where Toulouse thrashed Farul Constanţa 54-10 in front of a small crowd, the competition gathered momentum and crowds grew. Toulouse went on to become the first European rugby champions, eventually beating Cardiff in extra time in front of a crowd of 21,800 at Cardiff Arms Park.[8]

    England and Scotland joined the competition in 1996/7 but broadcaster ITV pulled the plug on their commitment.[10]. European rugby was further expanded with the advent of the European Challenge Cup for teams that did not qualify for the Heineken Cup. The Heineken Cup now had 20 teams divided into four pools of five.[11] Only Leicester and Brive reached the knock-out stages with 100 per cent records and ultimately made it to the final, Cardiff and Toulouse falling in the semi-finals. After 46 matches, Brive beat Leicester 28-9 in front of a crowd of 41,664 at Cardiff Arms Park, the match watched by an estimated television audience of 35 millions in 86 countries.[11] 1997/8 saw the introduction of teams meeting on a home and away basis in the pool games.[12] The five pools of four guaranteed each team a minimum of six games and the three quarter-final play-off matches all added up to a 70-match tournament. Brive reached the final again but were beaten late in the game by Bath with a penalty kick. However English clubs had decided to withdraw from the competition in dispute of the way it was run.[9]

    Without English clubs the 1998-99 tournament revolved around France, Italy and the Celtic nations. Sixteen teams took part in four pools of four, Ulster were invited in to the competition to even up the numbers. French clubs filled the top spot in three of the groups and for the fourth consecutive year a French club, in the shape of Colomiers from the Toulouse suburbs, reached the final. Despite this it was to be Ulster's year as they beat Toulouse (twice) and reigning French champions Stade Français on their way to the final at Lansdowne Road, Dublin. Ulster carried home the trophy after a 21-6 win in front of a capacity 49,000 crowd.[12] 1997/8 saw the introduction of teams meeting on a home and away basis in the pool games.[12]
     
  16. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    [edit] 1999 - 2004
    English clubs returned in 1999. The pool stages were spread over three months to allow the competition to develop alongside the nations’ own domestic competitions, and the knockout stages were scheduled to take the tournament into the early spring. For the first time four different nations — England, Ireland, France and Wales — made it through to the semi-finals. Munster's defeat of Toulouse in Bordeaux ended France's record of having contested every final and the Northampton Saints' victory over Llanelli made them the third different English club to make it to the final. The competition was decided with a final between Munster and Northampton, with Northampton coming out on top by a single point to claim a first major honour.[10]

    England supplied two of the 2000-01 semi-finalists — the Tigers and Gloucester — with Munster and French champions Stade Francais also reaching the last four. Both semi-finals were close, Munster going down by a point 16-15 to Stade Français in Lille and Leicester beating Gloucester 19-15 at Vicarage Road, Watford. The final, at Parc des Princes, Paris, attracted a crowd of 44,000 and the result was in the balance right up until the final whistle, but the Tigers walked off 34-30 winners.

    Munster got to the 2002 final with quarter-finals and semi-finals victories on French soil against Stade Francais and Castres. Leicester pipped Llanelli in the last four, the Scarlets having already halted their 11-match Heineken Cup winning streak in the pool stages. A record crowd saw the Leicester become the first side to successfully defend their title.[7] Toulouse's victory over French rivals Perpignan in 2003 meant that they joined the Tigers as the only teams to win the title twice.[7] Toulouse saw a 19-point half-time lead whittled away as the Catalans staged a dramatic comeback in a match in which the strong wind and showers played a major role, but survived to win. From 2002, the European Challenge Cup winner now automatically qualified for the Heineken Cup.

    In 2003/4 the Welsh Rugby Union (WRU) voted to create regions to play in the Celtic League and represent Wales in European competition. Henceforce Wales entered regional sides rather than the club sides which had previously competed. English side London Wasps had earned their first final appearance by beating Munster 37-32 in a Dublin semi-final while Toulouse triumphed 19-11 in the all-French contest with Biarritz in a packed Chaban Delmas, Bordeaux. The 2004 final at Twickenham saw Wasps defeat defending champions Toulouse 27-20 at Twickenham to win the Heineken Cup for the first time. The match was widely hailed as the best of the nine finals. With extra time looming at 20-20, an 11th hour opportunist try by scrum half Rob Howley settled the contest. Wasps’ victory denied Toulouse the honour of being the first club to win the Heineken Cup crown three times — albeit only delaying that honour for another 12 months.


    [edit] 2005 - present

    Munster fans watch their team on a jumbo screen on the streets of Limerick. Munster won the 2005-06 Cup and were runners-up twice before.The tenth anniversary Heineken Cup final saw the inaugural champions Toulouse battle with rising stars Stade Français where Murrayfield was the venue for the first Heineken Cup final in Scotland.[13] Fabien Galthié’s Paris side led until two minutes from the end of normal time before Frédéric Michalak levelled the contest for Toulouse with his first penalty strike. He repeated this in the initial stages of extra time and then sealed his side's success with a superb opportunist drop-goal. Toulouse became the first team to win three Heineken Cup titles.[13]

    In 2006, Munster defeated Biarritz in the Millennium Stadium, Cardiff, 23-19.[14] It was third time lucky for the Irish provincial side, who had been denied the ultimate prize twice by Northampton and Leicester in the past. South African import Trevor Halstead and man of the match Peter Stringer scored Munster's two tries, having gone behind early in the first half to a try by Biarritz's Fijian winger, Sireli Bobo. French international Dimitri Yachvili kept the side from the Basque country in contention with a 100% goal kicking record, but it was Irish international Ronan O'Gara who kicked the most important penalty goal to stretch the lead to 4 points with under 10 minutes of the game left. Despite pressure from Biarritz, Munster held on and a penalty awarded by referee Chris White against Yachvili for being offside at the scrum ended the 2005/06 French champions' hopes of a double. Stringer kicked the ball out into touch to spark mass celebrations inside the stadium and in Limerick and Cork. The 2006-07 Heineken Cup will be distributed to over 100 countries following Pitch International's securing of the rights.[15] This season was the first time in the history of the competition that two teams went unbeaten in pool play, with both Llanelli Scarlets and Biarritz doing so. Biarritz went into their final match at Northampton Saints with a chance to become the first team ever to score bonus-point wins in all their pool matches, but were only able to score two of the four tries needed. Leicester defeated Llanelli Scarlets to move into the final at Twickenham, with the possibility of winning a Treble of championships on the cards, having already won the EDF Energy Cup and the Guinness Premiership. Wasps won the final 25 points to 9 n front of a tournament record 81,076 fans.[16]

    During competition there was uncertainty over the future of the tournament after the 2006-07 season as French clubs have announced that they will not take part due to fixture congestion following the Rugby World Cup and an ongoing dispute between English clubs and the RFU over whether English clubs will be stakeholders in the competition.[17][18] The English boycott resulted from the RFU refusing to hand over 50 per cent of their shareholding and votitng rights in the European competitions.[19] The boycott is expected to have major implications for a number of European rugby bodies, with the Scottish Rugby Union (SRU) saying that “The future viability of the professional game in Scotland could be jeopardised if a successful outcome cannot be reached from these negotiations.”[20] The RFU said that they could potentially fill the void in Europe from their Guinness Premiership clubs by entering National Division One (league two) teams. The RFU said "If this situation is not resolved, the RFU owes it to the sport to keep this competition going...We have spoken to our FDR clubs, and if they want to compete we will support them.".[21] The International Rugby Board (IRB) chairman Syd Miller described the boycott as "absolutely disgraceful" and said that the English and French clubs should not be allowed to "dictate the course of world rugby".[19] A subsequent meeting led to the announcement that the tournament will be played in 2007-08, with clubs from all the six nations - though the English and French clubs will be from the second tier, unless the top-level clubs are given more powers. After further showdown talks to try to secure the presence of the Guinness Premiership and French Top 14 clubs in next season's tournament[22], on May 20th it was announced that both French and English top-tier teams would be competing [23].

    [edit] Records and statistics

    [edit] By nation
    Nation Winners Runners-up Winning clubs Runners-up
    England 6 2 Leicester Tigers (2), London Wasps (2), Bath, Northampton Saints Leicester Tigers (2)
    France 4 7 Toulouse (3), Brive Stade Français (2), Biarritz, Brive, Colomiers, Perpignan, Toulouse
    Ireland 2 2 Munster, Ulster Munster (2)
    Wales 0 1 Cardiff
     
  17. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    There is your Heineken ...... :icon_toast:
     
  18. BOLTS4LIFE

    BOLTS4LIFE Banned Banned

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    Could the moderators please make Jack Daniels available in the beverage department?

    That would be great!!
    Thanks.
     
  19. Thumper

    Thumper WHS

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    It's available, plus a few other new selections.
     
  20. BOLTS4LIFE

    BOLTS4LIFE Banned Banned

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    Thanks Thumper.

    I feel honored to have purchased the first one!!!
     
  21. Kwak

    Kwak ....

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  22. MtlBoltsFan

    MtlBoltsFan Jesse Ventura/Howard Stern 2016

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    My friend works at the Molson Brewery which distributes Heineken in Canada and there are a lot of preservatives in Heineken which are really bad for your body. Heineken was one of my favorite beers until I heard about the **** they put into it that you don't know about. Sleeman beer is the best beer. Their honey brown lager tastes like if you took a beehive and threw it into a bucket of maple syrup and then threw the bucket into a gigantic kettle made in the 19th century and added the finest quality hops and freshest ingredients and had it brewed by a guy with a gigantic mustache who drinks 5 gallons of beer a day and has been a master brewer for 5 decades. Who gives a **** if it doesn't stay cold for 10 hours like coors light, only pussies take 10 hours to drink their beer.
     
  23. Carrie1219

    Carrie1219 Banned Banned

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    MTL, is Sleemans sold in the US too? If so, I'll give it a try... :icon_toast:
     
  24. MtlBoltsFan

    MtlBoltsFan Jesse Ventura/Howard Stern 2016

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    Look at these ratings for sleeman honey brown lager

    "This is one of my favorites, not too dark but full and flavorfull. Also try the Sleemans cream ale!"

    "The greatest beer ever brewed.....EVER!"

    "The Best Brewed Beer Since Ever...Created By The Gods Themselves To Perfection!"

    "amazing! sleemans is the best beer ever!"

    "It's the only beer I drink."

    "Sleeman's Honey Brown is the best honey brown I've ever had, Rickard's Honey Brown is second. For something darker try Sleemans Dark, and Sleemans Cream Ale is my favourite beer. Period."

    "It doesn't get any better. Where can I get this in NJ?"

    [​IMG]

    "Sleeman Honey Brown is not only the best honey beer I have tasted, but easily one of my favourite beers. If I was rich, this is probably what I would drink. I had my first taste of Honey Brown when I went to a barbeque at a friend of a friend's. My friend and myself were the first to arrive and were standing in the kitchen as she prepared some chip dip for the barbeque. We talked for a little while until her dad walked in. He looked at her, then he looked at us and said, "I see a woman in the kitchen, and I see two guys watching, but I do not see the guys drinking beer." He then left and returned moments later with a bottle of Sleeman Honey Brown for each of us.

    It is hard to give Sleeman Honey Brown a score of anything less than perfect because even though it is not cheap, its excellent taste justifies the added cost. Therefore I give Honey Brown a perfect 10/10. It has a taste which is hard to beat, with its pleasing flavour and smooth finish. It is slightly thicker than most lagers and the sweet honey blocks out the taste from the bitter hops. Just as the name suggests, it is brown in colour and shows an off-white head which will quickly disappear. The sugar in the honey does add slightly to the fermentation giving it a 5.2% alcoholic content, but since most of it does not ferment it remains sweeter than most lagers."
     
  25. Trumpet_Man

    Trumpet_Man New Member

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    Sleeman sounds like semen.

    I will pass :abq2:
     
  26. MtlBoltsFan

    MtlBoltsFan Jesse Ventura/Howard Stern 2016

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    :lol:

    Heineken sounds like "Rocky Mountain Cowboy Piss"
     
  27. Kev

    Kev BoltTalker

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    :)
    That's funny, I always thought Heineken sounded like "I'm not nearly as cool as I think I am". ;)

    (I actually think Heineken's not bad, so don't hate on me please Heiny-fans!)
     
  28. BOLTS4LIFE

    BOLTS4LIFE Banned Banned

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    :lol: Exactly what I was thinking!!!
     
  29. AnteaterCharger

    AnteaterCharger Calibrating Bolttalk, Podcast by Podcast Staff Member Super Moderator Podcaster

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    that actually sounds good, i think i'll give it a shot
     
  30. MtlBoltsFan

    MtlBoltsFan Jesse Ventura/Howard Stern 2016

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    I don't even know if they sell it down there. You might have to drive up to Oregon or something :lol:
     

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